4
  public class PingPong implements Runnable {
      synchronized void hit(long n) {
          for (int i = 1; i < 3; i++)
              System.out.print(n + "-" + i + " ");
      }
      public static void main(String[] args) {
          new Thread(new PingPong()).start();
          new Thread(new PingPong()).start();
      }
      public void run() {
          hit(Thread.currentThread().getId());
      }
  }

The above code gives me output 8-1 9-1 8-2 9-2
But as the function is synchronized it should give output 8-1 8-2 9-1 9-2 or 9-1 9-2 8-1 8-2
Can anyone explain please?

0

6 Answers 6

7

'synchronized' on a method synchronizes all accesses of that method on a particular object.

So if you have 1 PingPong object no 2 threads will simultaneously enter its hit method, but with 2 objects one thread can enter the hit method of one of the objects while another thread runs the hit object of the other.

This makes sense because you usually use synchronized to ensure undisturbed access to stuff local to the current object. If your object represents some external entity to which threads sometimes need undisturbed access, make your object a singleton.

2
  • @Android Or you could fix it by making hit a static method. In that case synchronize synchronizes on PingPong.class instead of on the 2 different instances.
    – toto2
    Sep 7, 2011 at 19:21
  • @tota Well you could, but that sounds like extremely bad design. You need some object to represent the current game state anyhow so synchronizing on that seems much nicer
    – Voo
    Sep 7, 2011 at 20:15
4

To get the behaviour you want, try making the following change:

 public class PingPong implements Runnable {
      synchronized void hit(long n) {
          for (int i = 1; i < 3; i++)
              System.out.print(n + "-" + i + " ");
      }
      public static void main(String[] args) {
          PingPong p = new PingPong();
          new Thread(p).start();
          new Thread(p).start();
      }
      public void run() {
          hit(Thread.currentThread().getId());
      }
  }

With only a single instance of PingPong, the synchronized modifier on hit() will prevent one thread from interrupting the other, and your output will be either X-1 X-2 Y-1 Y-2 or visa-versa.

0
1

As per http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/syncmeth.html

First, it is not possible for two invocations of synchronized methods on the same object to interleave.

So since you have two PingPong objects the synchronized keyword does not work as you expected.

1

Nope .. synchronized simply mean that a specific method will not be executed by two threads at the same time, but if you have two threads working they can call that method in any order anyway. Simply, they will not access at the same time.

Moreover, it synchronizes on the object instances. Being two instances, there is no synchronization at all.

0
0

You have no lock or unlock flags. so they will both run at the same time.

T1->run()->hit(); forloop
T2->run()->hit(); forloop

2
  • @Mark -- something to block the 2nd thread from running until the 1st thread is finished
    – Naftali
    Sep 7, 2011 at 18:27
  • 1
    @Neal That's what the OP wants to happen with synchronized. And it would work if he had only one instance of PingPong.
    – dlev
    Sep 7, 2011 at 18:28
0

Change your code to

public class PingPong2 implements Runnable {

private static Object obj = new Object();
    void hit(long n) {
     synchronized(obj)
     {
    for (int i = 1; i < 3; i++)
        System.out.print(n + "-" + i + " ");
     }
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    new Thread(new PingPong2()).start();
    new Thread(new PingPong2()).start();
}
public void run() {
    hit(Thread.currentThread().getId());
  }   }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.