8

Using ONLY:

! ~ & ^ | + << >>

NO LOOPS

I need to determine the sign of a 32 bit integer and I need to return 1 if positive, 0 if 0 and -1 if negative.

Any ideas? I first thought about shifting over 31 bits and then looking at that sign but that obviously wont work and now I am kind of stuck.

14
  • I would only be able to tell if its negative. If its 0 then the number could be all zeros or it could be positive but I shifted those bits away.
    – Peter
    Sep 7, 2011 at 22:57
  • Ah, I missed the requirement to also detect 0. Sep 7, 2011 at 22:59
  • @Oli: it's not portable because the result of right-shifting a negative values is implementation-defined, and there's no requirement that it either 0-fill or sign-fill. That said, in practice it'll work, since all or almost all implementations do one or the other. Sep 7, 2011 at 23:00
  • 4
    Note that neither ! nor + is a bitwise operator. Sep 7, 2011 at 23:00
  • 1
    Are you allowed to do, e.g., if (!x) return 0;?
    – Tom Zych
    Sep 7, 2011 at 23:05

8 Answers 8

6

If conditionals (not if statements) and subtraction are allowed, the simplest & cleaner solution (IMO) is:

int sign = (v > 0) - (v < 0);

Not using subtraction (and assuming int is 32 bits):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>
#include <limits.h>

int process(int v) {
    int is_negative = (unsigned int)v >> 31; // or sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT - 1
    int is_zero = !v;
    int is_positive = !is_negative & !is_zero;
    int sign = (is_positive + ~is_negative) + 1;
    return sign;
}

int main() {
    assert(process(0) == 0);
    printf("passed the zero test\n");
    for (int v = INT_MIN; v < 0; v++) {
        assert(process(v) == -1);
    }
    printf("passed all negative tests\n");
    for (int v = 1; v < INT_MAX; v++) {
        assert(process(v) == +1);
    }
    printf("passed all positive tests\n");
    return 0;
}

Here's are the results:

$ gcc -o test test.c -Wall -Wextra -O3 -std=c99 && ./test && echo $#
passed zero test
passed all negative tests
passed all positive tests
0
6
  • The question specified no loops. IN ALL CAPS. Sep 8, 2011 at 4:53
  • 1
    @Carey: please, understand the code before casting any votes. Note the loop is there just to provide input values (v) for testing the algorithm.
    – jweyrich
    Sep 8, 2011 at 5:27
  • I understand the code. If your solution involved only bitwise operators as the question required I wouldn't have mentioned it. Sep 8, 2011 at 5:35
  • @Carey: I split it into a separate function to make it clear. Hope this helps.
    – jweyrich
    Sep 8, 2011 at 5:37
  • Please, show me that requirement (only bitwise operators). I don't see it in the question. So far you've raised 2 different arguments, and both are invalid.
    – jweyrich
    Sep 8, 2011 at 5:38
5

Try this:

(x >> 31) | (((0 - x) >> 31) & 1)

How about this:

(x >> 31) | (((~x + 1) >> 31) & 1)

EDIT 2:

In response to issues (or rather nit-picking) raised in the comments...

Assumptions for these solutions to be valid:

  1. x is of type 32-bit signed integer.
  2. On this system, signed 32-bit integers are two's complement. (right-shift is arithmetic)
  3. Wrap-around on arithmetic overflow.
  4. For the first solution, the literal 0 is the same type as x.
35
  • 1
    Does this depend on a particular behaviour for >> when the left-hand operand is negative? Sep 7, 2011 at 23:03
  • 7
    - isn't in the list of allowed operators, no? Sep 7, 2011 at 23:06
  • 1
    if we don't have two's complement then it's virtually unsolvable, no? I mean we have to make some assumption about what "negative" is right?
    – Kevin
    Sep 7, 2011 at 23:10
  • 1
    also your tricks wouldn't work if int is wider than 32 bit. then all your expressions would be done in that width and your shift wouldn't be the correct one. Sep 7, 2011 at 23:13
  • 3
    This is wrong. The result of x>>31 is implementation-defined for negative x, there's no guarantee what its value is. It could be 0 for all negative x in a conforming C implementation. But I think this as a defect in the question -- I strongly suspect that (a) the expected answer uses a non-portable >>, and (b) the question as actually asked has no solution. So no downvote. Sep 7, 2011 at 23:22
2

Why do you need to use bitwise operators for that?

int get_sign(int value)
{
    return (value < 0) ? -1 : (int)(value != 0);
}

If you absolutely have to use bitwise operators, then you can use the & operator to check for negative values, no shifting needed:

int get_sign(int value)
{
    return (value & 0x80000000) ? -1 : (int)(value != 0);
}

If you want to shift:

int get_sign(int value)
{
    return ((value >> 31) & 1) ? -1 : (int)(value != 0);
}
0
2

A bit more convoluted, but there is this:

(~((x >> 31) & 1) + 1) | (((~x + 1) >> 31) & 1)

This should take care of the ambiguity of whether the shift will fill in 1's or 0's

For a breakdown, any place we have this construct:

(z >> 31) & 1

Will result in a 1 when negative, and a 0 otherwise.

Any place we have:

(~z + 1)

We get the negated number (-z)

So the first half will produce a result of 0xFFFFFFFF (-1) iff x is negative, and the second half will produce 0x00000001 (1) iff x is positive. Bitwise or'ing them together will then produce a 0x00000000 (0) if neither is true.

1

What about:

int getsign(int n)
{
  return (!!n) + (~((n >> 30) & 2) + 1);
}

..for 32-bit signed int, 2's complement only.

!!n gives 1 if n is nonzero. ((n >> 30) & 2) gives 2 iff the high bit (sign) is set. The bitwise NOT and +1 take the 2's complement of this, giving -2 or 0. Adding gives -1 (1 + -2) for negative values, 0 (0 + 0) for zero, and +1 (1 + 0) for positive values.

1

Assuming the implementation defines arithmetic right shift:

(x>>31) | !!x

Unlike Mystical's answer, there is no UB.

And, if you want to also support systems where right shift is defined to be arithmetic shift:

~!(x>>31)+1 | !!x

Edit: Sorry, I omitted a ! in the second version. It should be:

~!!(x>>31)+1 | !!x

This version is still dependent on the implementation being twos complement and having either arithmetic or logical right-shift, i.e. if the implementation-defined behavior were something else entirely it could break. However, if you change the types to unsigned types, all of the implementation-defined behavior vanishes and the result is -1U, 0U, or 1U depending on the "sign" (high bit and zero/nonzero status) of x.

5
  • +1 for the most elegant solution so far, although it is not a real one, since it still depending on the type of right shift that the architecture provides. Wouldn't it be able to combine the two to a unique solution? Sep 8, 2011 at 6:22
  • Correct, right-shift in signed integers with negative values has unspecified behavior in C99. Btw, your second example lacks some parenthesis?
    – jweyrich
    Sep 8, 2011 at 6:31
  • 1
    @jweyrich: it's not unspecified, it's implementation-defined. In practice, we know that all implementations we care about are either arithmetic or logical right shift (if it was unspecified, they wouldn't even have to be consistent, but they have to define the result and understandably they seem always choose one or the other). In principle, an implementation can define that -1 >> 1 == 0, which is why I don't think it's possible to solve the problem without some additional assumptions. Perhaps stating those assumptions is part of the homework, of course. Sep 8, 2011 at 9:18
  • The second expression doesn't seem to give the right answer for 0. Sep 8, 2011 at 9:23
  • Typo, or at least I'll use that as my excuse for a logic error. :-) It's fixed now. Sep 8, 2011 at 12:37
1

I'm not sure this is the absolute ideal way to do things, but I think it's reasonably portable and at least somewhat simpler than what you had:

#define INT_BITS 32

int sign(int v) { 
    return (!!v) | -(int)((unsigned int)v >> (INT_BITS-1));
}
1
  • @Mysticial: There is a minor problem: - isn't actually allowed on this question, so technically it's not really allowed as an answer to this question. Sep 20, 2012 at 3:50
0

Dimitri's idea could be simplified to (!!x) - ((x >> 30) & 2)

And just to give one more cryptic solution:

~!x & ((-((unsigned) x >> 31)) | !!x)

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