252

I am attempting to check if my Jquery Library is loaded onto my HTML page. I am checking to see if it works, but something is not right. Here is what I have:

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="/query-1.6.3.min.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript">
          $(document).ready(function(){
             if (jQuery) {  
               // jQuery is loaded  
               alert("Yeah!");
             } else {
               // jQuery is not loaded
               alert("Doesn't Work");
             }
          });
        </script>
6
  • 3
    Don't use a capital R in "$(document).Ready"
    – Serigan
    Sep 29, 2012 at 13:24
  • 12
    alert(window.$?1:0) Jul 5, 2017 at 13:01
  • 1
    Why are you still using the old xhtml standard? just use <!doctype html> instead
    – Luke
    Feb 28, 2019 at 5:38
  • If the $(document) ready function runs at all, then jquery is loaded. So you could simply do $(document).ready(function(){ alert("Ready!"); }); Granted, this won't show an alert if jquery fails to run. But it is enough, if you simply need to verify that you have correctly referred to jquery library. Jul 15, 2020 at 20:25
  • try { $.fn.jquery;alert(1); } catch(err) { alert(0) }
    – user815693
    Apr 17, 2022 at 14:27

12 Answers 12

467

something is not right

Well, you are using jQuery to check for the presence of jQuery. If jQuery isn't loaded then $() won't even run at all and your callback won't execute, unless you're using another library and that library happens to share the same $() syntax.

Remove your $(document).ready() (use something like window.onload instead):

window.onload = function() {
    if (window.jQuery) {  
        // jQuery is loaded  
        alert("Yeah!");
    } else {
        // jQuery is not loaded
        alert("Doesn't Work");
    }
}
11
  • 2
    This will still throw an error as is when jQuery is undefined. You need check for window.jQuery.
    – gilly3
    Sep 8, 2011 at 0:23
  • 1
    @gilly3: Yeah, pesky scoping issues. Fixed.
    – BoltClock
    Sep 8, 2011 at 0:24
  • I have the jquery-1.6.3.min.js file in the same directory as the html file. Not sure why it doesn't load. Sep 8, 2011 at 0:28
  • 3
    @DmainEvent: Are they both in the root directory? Your src has a leading /, that means it's looking in the root.
    – BoltClock
    Sep 8, 2011 at 0:30
  • Actually no. Let me change that and give it a shot. Sep 8, 2011 at 0:31
55

As per this link:

if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') {
    // jQuery IS NOT loaded, do stuff here.
}

there are a few more in comments of the link as well like,
if (typeof jQuery == 'function') {...}

//or

if (typeof $ == 'function') {...}

// or

if (jQuery) {
    console.log("jquery is loaded");
} else {
    console.log("Not loaded");
}

Hope this covers most of the good ways to get this thing done!!
3
  • 2
    @JakeN After a certain amount of time, downvotes can't be undone unless the post is edited. There is one issue with this post, though: if (jQuery) { will throw an error in strict mode if jQuery is not loaded, so that last code snippet is a bad suggestion.
    – JLRishe
    Nov 24, 2017 at 5:37
  • @TusharShukla for if (typeof $== 'function') {...} why there is no space between dollar sign & 2 equal signs ?
    – Grace
    Sep 9, 2022 at 2:45
  • @Grace That was an indentation issue, fixed it. Sep 9, 2022 at 9:52
28
if ('undefined' == typeof window.jQuery) {
    // jQuery not present
} else {
    // jQuery present
}
0
27

You can do this fast on the console-tab when inspecting your webpage.

E.g:

$ === jQuery

If it returns true it means it's loaded.

3
  • This will raise an exception if jQuery is not loaded, though: Uncaught ReferenceError: jQuery is not defined
    – Batkins
    Oct 4, 2018 at 18:05
  • 1
    jQuery might not be loaded as "jQuery" but only as $. May 2, 2022 at 9:26
  • @TomAnderson that would be rather unnecessary since jQuery is so popular and specific it would be very hard for someone to accidentally create a variable with that name, do people do that (importing jQuery as $ only)? Jan 24, 2023 at 20:18
11

Just a small modification that might actually solve the problem:

window.onload = function() {
   if (window.jQuery) {  
       // jQuery is loaded  
       alert("Yeah!");
   } else {
    location.reload();
   }
}

Instead of $(document).Ready(function() use window.onload = function().

9

Do not use jQuery to test your jQuery (Isn't that obvious)

Using jQuery ✘

if ('undefined' == typeof window.jQuery) {
    $('#selector').appendTo('jQuery is NOT working');
} else {
    $('#selector').appendTo('jQuery is working');
}

Using javaScript ✔

if ('undefined' == typeof window.jQuery) {
    document.getElementById('selector').innerHTML = "jQuery is NOT working";
} else {
    document.getElementById('selector').innerHTML = "jQuery is working";
}
4

If jQuery is loading asynchronously, you can wait till it is defined, checking for it every period of time:

(function() {
    var a = setInterval( function() {
        if ( typeof window.jQuery === 'undefined' ) {
            return;
        }
        clearInterval( a );

        console.log( 'jQuery is loaded' ); // call your function with jQuery instead of this
    }, 500 );
})();

This method can be used for any variable, you are waiting to appear.

4

Update:

Nowadays I use this in production and it works like a charm.

Make sure that you are indeed loading jQuery though, otherwise it can cause an infinite loop. I'd recommend adding a counter & breaking it if you need:

(async() => {
    console.log("waiting for jQuery");

    while(!window.hasOwnProperty("jQuery")) {
        await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, 100));
    }
       
    console.log("jQuery is loaded.");
})();

Old answer: You can check whether it exists and, if it does not exist, load it dynamically.

function loadScript(src) {
    return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
        var s;
        s = document.createElement('script');
        s.src = src;
        s.onload = resolve;
        s.onerror = reject;
        document.head.appendChild(s);
    });
}



async function load(){
if (!window.jQuery){
    await loadScript(`https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.5.1/jquery.min.js`);
}

console.log(jQuery);

}

load();

1

Below is a Universal Cross-Browser JQuery Loader. This one checks if the document's DOM, HTML, CSS, files and resources are fully loaded, and if the JQuery file itself was parsed and running. This checker works in older browsers and supports old Internet Explorer (v. 4-11) as well as various user agents going back to 2001. It is limited only by various versions of JQuery itself that happen to be bug free in those browsers. Sadly, many are not.

Keep in mind, you cannot run scripts that rely on JQuery till the JQuery files and any resources used are downloaded, parsed, and JIT compiled. You can also use the code below to test if DOM is processed early in the browser before other resources are downloaded, and run non-JQuery early scripts to work with the DOM. The first function below demonstrates that feature. This assumes only the DOM is built and many CSS, images, and JavaScript files are still not downloaded. This is useful if you need deferred scripts to download early before JQuery and other libraries and manipulate the DOM for some reason.

    // EARLY JAVASCRIPT DOM PROCESSING (non-JQuery)
    // Function to run as soon as the HTML is parsed and DOM rendered.
    function DOMStart(state) {
        if (state == null) {
            state = "Unknown";
        }
        alert('DOM State: ' + state);
    };

    // FULLY LOADED WINDOW/DOCUMENT JAVASCRIPT PROCESSING, plus JQUERY CHECK
    // TEST IF JQUERY IS LOADED (without using JQuery)
    // Function to run as soon as all resources associated with the document are ready and JQuery script files are loaded.

    function JQueryStart(state) {
        if (state == null) {
            state = "Unknown";
        }
        alert('JQuery State: ' + state);

        //if (typeof window.jQuery !== 'undefined') { // Alt. Version #2 check
        if (window.jQuery) {
            // jquery is loaded...
            alert("JQuery is loaded.");

            // JQuery is downloaded. Now use JQuery to test if
            // the document object model is fully
            // loaded again from the point of view of JQuery.
            // In most cases it is based on logic below.
            // It is possible to load this function only when the
            // DOM is ready instead of the whole document and all
            // its files are ready and run a timer to detect when 
            // "window.jQuery" above is true. That would allow you
            // to know JQuery is downloaded prior to the DOM and 
            // utilize it earlier.

            $(document).ready(function () {

                // ======== Begin JQuery Scripts ======== 


            });
        } else {
            // JQuery did not load...
            console.log("JQuery failed to load!");
            alert("JQuery failed to load!");
        }
    };


    // OLD BROWSER PAGE LOADER: This document loading check 
    // supports older browsers, including IE4+ and many older 
    // browsers like Firefox (2006), early Chrome (2010), etc.
    // Note: "interactive" is when the document has finished
    // loading and the document has been parsed and DOM is complete,
    // but sub-resources such as scripts, images, style sheets and
    // frames are still loading. "complete" is when all resources
    // are loaded and right before the "Window.load event fires.
    // Note: "document.onreadystatechange" has support in very old
    // browsers amd may have support from IE4+, It fires as each
    // state of the docuent load process changes below. IE 4-9 only
    // supported "readyState" of "complete".

    // If the document is already loaded and those events fired, run the JQuery function above.

    if (document.readyState) {
        if (document.readyState === "complete" // IE 4-9 only knows "complete"
            || document.readyState === "loaded") {
            JQueryStart("Document fully loaded (early)");
        } else {
            // New browsers should run scripts when the HTML is
            // parsed and the DOM built. Older IE browsers will
            // not support the "DOMContentLoaded" event and instead
            // fire when complete below. This allows newer browsers
            // to fire only when the HTML DOM is ready, which happens
            // right after the readyState=interactive fires.

            if (window.addEventListener) {
                // Listen for the "DOMContentLoaded" event, which occurs
                // after "interactive" but when the HTML DOM is complete.
                // This means the DOM is ready but other resources style 
                // sheets, other scripts, images, etc. may not be.

                window.addEventListener('load', function () {
                    JQueryStart("Window fully loaded (2)");
                }, false);
                window.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', function () {
                    DOMStart("DOM complete (early)");
                }, false);
            } else {

                // Run the older page "onreadystatechange" for older
                // browsers. Below, runs when page resources are not
                // yet fully loaded, so set up event listeners based
                // on needs of old/new web browsers script support.
                // This fires each time the document readyState changes,
                // except in IE 4-9 that only supports "complete". Below,
                // the DOM is loaded and parsed, but adding "interactive"
                // to the condition below means other resources like CSS, 
                // images, etc may not have completed yet.
                // Note: Add "interactive" below if needing to run early 
                // scripts as soon as the DOM is complete, and do not require 
                // styles sheets, script files, images, other resources, etc.
                // Note: "interactive" fires before "DOMContentLoaded", but in 
                // IE 9 - 11 fires too early before parsing.

                var isDone = false;
                document.onreadystatechange = function () {
                    if (document.readyState === "complete" // IE 4-9 only knows "complete"
                        || document.readyState === "loaded") {
                        if (!isDone) {
                            isDone = true;
                            JQueryStart("Document fully loaded");
                        }
                    }
                    else if (document.readyState === "interactive") {
                        DOMStart("Document interactive (early)");
                    }
                };
            }
        }
    } else {
        // This is a fallback event format that works well in many older browsers.
        window.onload = function () {
            JQueryStart("Window fully loaded (1)");
        };
    };
0

This worked for me when the script would sometimes get run mid page(.net partial) or after the page has been completely loaded (jquery.load() call)

window.onload = function(){
   ... jQuery Statements ...
}
if (window.jQuery!==undefined)
    window.onload();
-1

You can just type window.jQuery in Console . If it return a function(e,n) ... Then it is confirmed that the jquery is loaded and working successfully.

1
  • While this works and has some utility (eg if you just want to check that your CDN is working when you first include jQuery) it's not useful for testing programmatically. Eg my code checks for jQuery's presence in case the CDN is down (to fallback on a local copy of jQuery), and to differentiate how/whether to assign events (eg on click) when loading HTML via AJAX etc
    – Jon Story
    Oct 19, 2020 at 15:06
-3

A quick way is to run a jQuery command in the developer console. On any browser hit F12 and try to access any of the element .

 $("#sideTab2").css("background-color", "yellow");

enter image description here

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