35

What I'm trying to do is to update a simple div to say "Processing..." before executing a CPU-intensive script (it takes 3-12 seconds to run, no AJAX) then update the div to say "Finished!" when done.

What I'm seeing is the div never gets updated with "Processing...". If I set a breakpoint immediately after that command, then the div text does get updated, so I know the syntax is correct. Same behavior in IE9, FF6, Chrome13.

Even when bypassing jQuery and using basic raw Javascript, I see the same issue.

You'd think this would have an easy answer. However, since the jQuery .html() and .text() don't have a callback hook, that's not an option. It's also not animated, so there is no .queue to manipulate.

You can test this yourselves using the sample code I prepared below that shows both the jQuery and Javascript implementations with a 5 second high-CPU function. The code is easy to follow. When you click either the button or the link, you never see "Processing..."

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6.1/jquery.min.js" ></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
function addSecs(d, s) {return new Date(d.valueOf()+s*1000);}
function doRun() {
    document.getElementById('msg').innerHTML = 'Processing JS...';
    start = new Date();
    end = addSecs(start,5);
    do {start = new Date();} while (end-start > 0);
    document.getElementById('msg').innerHTML = 'Finished JS';   
}
$(function() {
    $('button').click(function(){
        $('div').text('Processing JQ...');  
        start = new Date();
        end = addSecs(start,5);
        do {start = new Date();} while (end-start > 0);
        $('div').text('Finished JQ');   
    });
});
</script>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="msg">Not Started</div>
    <button>jQuery</button>
    <a href="#" onclick="doRun()">javascript</a>
</body>
</html>
3
  • Could one query the ready flags that one checks to see whether a page has finished loading? It seems that if the DOM is recalculating, it is in the same state as when it is initially laying out the page, and should mark itself as such. But I don't know where to look for the rules about that. Aug 20, 2014 at 13:25
  • @Jon, this is not an issue related to page loading. The page is already loaded, and the user requests a CPU-intensive task to be performed. Kevin's answer below is a workable solution.
    – pcormier
    Jan 10, 2015 at 16:29
  • "You'd think this would have an easy answer." No kidding. This problem has been driving me crazy.
    – Mars
    Jul 16, 2016 at 18:01

4 Answers 4

19

set it to processing, then do a setTimeout to prevent the cpu intensive task from running until after the div has been updated.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6.1/jquery.min.js" ></script>
<script>
function addSecs(d, s) {return new Date(d.valueOf()+s*1000);}
function doRun() {
    document.getElementById('msg').innerHTML = 'Processing JS...';
    setTimeout(function(){
         start = new Date();
         end = addSecs(start,5);
         do {start = new Date();} while (end-start > 0);
         document.getElementById('msg').innerHTML = 'Finished Processing';   
    },10);
}
$(function() {
    $('button').click(doRun);
});    
</script>
    </head>
<body>
    <div id="msg">Not Started</div>
    <button>jQuery</button>
    <a href="#" onclick="doRun()">javascript</a>
</body>
</html>

you can modify the setTimeout delay as needed, it may need to be larger for slower machines/browsers.

Edit:

You could also use an alert or a confirm dialog to allow the page time to update.

document.getElementById('msg').innerHTML = 'Processing JS...';
if ( confirm( "This task may take several seconds. Do you wish to continue?" ) ) {
     // run code here
}
14
  • 1
    Great! The setTimeout permits the rendering to complete. Hopefully there won't be a case where it takes longer than 10ms to do so. (I suppose extending to 100ms wouldn't hurt.) Though the dialog solution fixes the problem as well, it adds an unnecessary and annoying extra click.
    – pcormier
    Sep 8, 2011 at 22:22
  • 4
    -1 because this is effectively a race condition. There's no guarantee the elapsed time will be lower than 10ms even on fast machines here... Aug 3, 2015 at 14:44
  • 7
    @yerforkferchips Yes, it does guarentee it due to how the event loop works. All we have to do is push the callback into the callback queue so that it won't run until the next time the event loop runs. It could even have been as small as 0ms and still work everywhere because the renderer (which also gets put into the callback queue) has priority.
    – Kevin B
    Aug 3, 2015 at 14:46
  • 1
    @Brett84c the fact that it is synchronous doesn't change anything. It will in change the dom immediately, but until the callstack is clear the UI won't update. The ui won't update until after the long cpu intensive task.
    – Kevin B
    Jun 23, 2017 at 16:26
  • 2
    Right. It's the same thing you can observe when you perform a dom update followed by an alert('foo'). The alert will pop up, then after you close the alert the dom update will render. This happens because the alert is synchronous, much like the cpu intensive task above.
    – Kevin B
    Jun 23, 2017 at 16:34
3

You have a loop that runs for 5 seconds and freezes the web browser during that time. Since the web browser is frozen it can't do any rendering. You should be using setTimeout() instead of a loop, but I'm assuming that loop is just a replacement for a CPU intensive function that takes a while? You can use setTimeout to give the browser a chance to render before executing your function:

jQuery:

$(function() {
    $('button').click(function(){
        (function(cont){
            $('div').text('Processing JQ...');  
            start = new Date();
            end = addSecs(start,5);
            setTimeout(cont, 1);
        })(function(){
            do {start = new Date();} while (end-start > 0);
            $('div').text('Finished JQ');   
        })
    });
});

Vanilla JS:

document.getElementsByTagName('a')[0].onclick = function(){
    doRun(function(){
         do {start = new Date();} while (end-start > 0);
         document.getElementById('msg').innerHTML = 'Finished JS';   
    });
    return false;
};

function doRun(cont){
    document.getElementById('msg').innerHTML = 'Processing JS...';
    start = new Date();
    end = addSecs(start,5);
    setTimeout(cont, 1);
}

You should also remember to always declare all variables using the var keyword, and avoid exposing them to the global scope. Here is a JSFiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/Paulpro/ypQ6m/

1
  • 3
    Yes, the loop was simply meant to represent the CPU-intensive function. This was not intended to be a representation of production code, just a quick snippet to demonstrate the problem.
    – pcormier
    Sep 8, 2011 at 22:20
3

I had to wait for jQuery to manipulate the DOM and then grap the changes (load form fields multiple times into a form, then to submit it). The DOM grew and the insertion took longer and longer. I saved the changes using ajax to have to user to be able to continue where he left off.

This did NOT WORK as intended:

jQuery('.parentEl').prepend('<p>newContent</p>');
doSave(); // wrapping it into timeout was to short as well sometimes

Since jQuery functions like .prepend() do continue the chain only when done, the following seemed to do the trick:

jQuery('.parentEl').prepend('<p>newContent</p>').queue(function() {
  doSave();
});
2

As of 2019 one uses double requesAnimationFrame to skip a frame instead of creating a race condition using setTimeout.

....
function doRun() {
    document.getElementById('msg').innerHTML = 'Processing JS...';
    requestAnimationFrame(() =>
    requestAnimationFrame(function(){
         start = new Date();
         end = addSecs(start,5);
         do {start = new Date();} while (end-start > 0);
         document.getElementById('msg').innerHTML = 'Finished Processing';   
    }))
}
...
2
  • This made me confused
    – TangMonk
    Oct 24, 2019 at 6:38
  • @TangMonk can you say what is missing so i can update this- e.g. what confuses you?
    – Estradiaz
    Oct 24, 2019 at 7:56

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