133

How would I determine whether a given number is even or odd? I've been wanting to figure this out for a long time now and haven't gotten anywhere.

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17 Answers 17

204

You can use the modulus operator, but that can be slow. If it's an integer, you can do:

if ( (x & 1) == 0 ) { even... } else { odd... }

This is because the low bit will always be set on an odd number.

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  • 23
    It still amazes me that people prefer modulus over simply checking the first bit of the number. Obviously if the first bit is set, then the number must be odd. It's usually faster, and it reads just as well in my opinion. I think the reason others don't prefer it over modulus comes down to a lack of understanding of binary. – crush Feb 13 '14 at 21:47
  • 5
    @dtech I think you misunderstand the meaning of premature optimization. If you know beforehand that one method is more performant than another, then it's not premature optimization to use the more performant method. It's intelligent. That said, my comment was more about how checking the first bit is more logical than using modulus when simply checking for even/odd. The problem is that many programmers don't understand what either method does, and just follow tutorials. – crush May 5 '14 at 11:27
  • 54
    @crush n % 2 == 0 semantically means Divide by 2 and check if the remainder is 0, which is much clearer than n & 1 == 0 which means Zero all the bits but leave the least significant bit unchanged and check if the result is 0. The improved clarity of the first is worth the (probably non-existant) overhead. That is what I meant with premature optimization. If something is slow and you profile it in that part changing n % 2 to n & 1 is certainly justified, but doing it beforehand isn't. In general working with the bit operators is a bad idea before profiling. – dtech May 5 '14 at 12:36
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    @dtech First of all, your opinion is completely subjective. Second of all, you still don't understand what "premature optimization" means. It is a micro optimization, sure. It's not a premature optimization. Premature optimization is revising existing code with "optimizations" without first profiling the existing code to see that it is inefficient. However, knowing beforehand that writing code one way vs. another way is more efficient, and choosing to use the more efficient code, is NOT premature optimization. It is your subjective opinion that n % 2 == 0 is cleaner than n & 1 == 0. – crush May 5 '14 at 13:49
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    I'd just like to point out for people coming here that using the modulo operator is fine, but if you're using it to test oddness, write n % 2 != 0, not n % 2 == 1, because the latter doesn't work for negative numbers in Java. – Jxek Jan 8 '15 at 9:38
99
if((x%2)==0)
   // even
else
   // odd
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30

If the remainder when you divide by 2 is 0, it's even. % is the operator to get a remainder.

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24

The remainder operator, %, will give you the remainder after dividing by a number.

So n % 2 == 0 will be true if n is even and false if n is odd.

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22

Every even number is divisible by two, regardless of if it's a decimal (but the decimal, if present, must also be even). So you can use the % (modulo) operator, which divides the number on the left by the number on the right and returns the remainder...

boolean isEven(double num) { return ((num % 2) == 0); }
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  • 1
    'Regardless of if it's a decimal' is meaningless. Decimal is a radix. Do you mean 'contains a fractional part'? – Marquis of Lorne Apr 12 '17 at 0:07
4

I would recommend

Java Puzzlers: Traps, Pitfalls, and Corner Cases Book by Joshua Bloch and Neal Gafter

There is a briefly explanation how to check if number is odd. First try is something similar what @AseemYadav tried:

public static boolean isOdd(int i) {
     return i % 2 == 1;
}

but as was mentioned in book:

when the remainder operation returns a nonzero result, it has the same sign as its left operand

so generally when we have negative odd number then instead of 1 we'll get -1 as result of i%2. So we can use @Camilo solution or just do:

public static boolean isOdd(int i) {
     return i % 2 != 0;
}

but generally the fastest solution is using AND operator like @lucasmo write above:

public static boolean isOdd(int i) {
     return (i & 1) != 0;
}

@Edit It also worth to point Math.floorMod(int x, int y); which deals good with negative the dividend but also can return -1 if the divisor is negative

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2

Works for positive or negative numbers

int start = -3;
int end = 6;

for (int val = start; val < end; val++)
{
    // Condition to Check Even, Not condition (!) will give Odd number
    if (val % 2 == 0) 
    {
        System.out.println("Even" + val);
    }
    else
    {
        System.out.println("Odd" + val);
    }
}
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2

Least significant bit (rightmost) can be used to check if the number is even or odd. For all Odd numbers, rightmost bit is always 1 in binary representation.

public static boolean checkOdd(long number){
   return ((number & 0x1) == 1);
}
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2

If the modulus of the given number is equal to zero, the number is even else odd number. Below is the method that does that:

public void evenOrOddNumber(int number) {
  if (number % 2 == 0) {
    System.out.println("Number is Even");
   } else {
    System.out.println("Number is odd");
  }
 }
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2

This following program can handle large numbers ( number of digits greater than 20 )

package com.isEven.java;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class isEvenValuate{

public static void main(String[] args) {            

        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        String digit = in.next();

        int y = Character.getNumericValue(digit.charAt(digit.length()-1));

        boolean isEven = (y&1)==0;

        if(isEven)
            System.out.println("Even");
        else
            System.out.println("Odd");

    }
}

Here is the output ::

  122873215981652362153862153872138721637272
  Even
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1

You can use the modulus operator, but that can be slow. A more efficient way would be to check the lowest bit because that determines whether a number is even or odd. The code would look something like this:

public static void main(String[] args) {        
    System.out.println("Enter a number to check if it is even or odd");        
    System.out.println("Your number is " + (((new Scanner(System.in).nextInt() & 1) == 0) ? "even" : "odd"));        
}
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1

You can do like this:

boolean is_odd(int n) {
    return n % 2 == 1 || n % 2 == -1;
}

This is because Java has in its modulo operation the sign of the dividend, the left side: n. So for negatives and positives dividends, the modulo has the sign of them.

Of course, the bitwise operation is faster and optimized, simply document the line of code with two or three short words, which does it for readability.

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1

Another easy way to do it without using if/else condition (works for both positive and negative numbers):

int n = 8;
List<String> messages = Arrays.asList("even", "odd");

System.out.println(messages.get(Math.abs(n%2)));

For an Odd no., the expression will return '1' as remainder, giving

messages.get(1) = 'odd' and hence printing 'odd'

else, 'even' is printed when the expression comes up with result '0'

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  • 1
    This question was tagged as JAVA. You posted an answer in Python. Not that useful really. – Mark Dec 4 '17 at 16:49
  • Hey @Mark ! Thanks for pointing that out, edited the answer. Hope, it can still be of any help to someone this time. – Aseem Yadav Dec 11 '17 at 14:30
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    It can be easily crashed for example by: int n = -3;. As @Camilo mentioned below - when the remainder operation return a nonzero result, it has the same sign as its left operand so generelly we have System.out.println(messages.get(-1)); what gives us java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException – Michu93 Aug 23 '18 at 11:30
0
package isevenodd;
import java.util.Scanner;
public class IsEvenOdd {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter number: ");
        int y = scan.nextInt();       
        boolean isEven = (y % 2 == 0) ? true : false;
        String x = (isEven) ? "even" : "odd";  
        System.out.println("Your number is " + x);
    }
}
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0

Here's an example to determine whether a given number is even or odd,

import java.util.Scanner;

public class EvenOdd
{
   public static void main(String[] args)
   {
      int a;
      System.out.println("Please enter a number to check even or odd:");
      Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
      a = sc.nextInt();

      if(a % 2 == 0)
      {
         System.out.println("Entered number is an even number");
      }
      else
      {
         System.out.println("Entered number is an odd number");
      }
   }
}

Well, there are many ways to determine the same. Refer this resource for more examples to find the given number is even or odd.

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0

Here is full example:-

import java.text.ParseException;

public class TestOddEvenExample {
    public static void main(String args[]) throws ParseException {

        int x = 24;
        oddEvenChecker(x);

        int xx = 3;
        oddEvenChecker(xx);
    }

    static void oddEvenChecker(int x) {
        if (x % 2 == 0)
            System.out.println("You entered an even number." + x);
        else
            System.out.println("You entered an odd number." + x);
    }
}

enter image description here

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0
    /**
     * Check if a number is even or not using modulus operator.
     *
     * @param number the number to be checked.
     * @return {@code true} if the given number is even, otherwise {@code false}.
     */
    public static boolean isEven(int number) {
        return number % 2 == 0;
    }

    /**
     * Check if a number is even or not using & operator.
     *
     * @param number the number to be checked.
     * @return {@code true} if the given number is even, otherwise {@code false}.
     */
    public static boolean isEvenFaster(int number) {
        return (number & 1) == 0;
    }

source

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