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What is best practice for handling the dropping of a temp table. I have read that you should explicitly handle the drop and also that sql server should handle the drop....what is the correct method? I was always under the impression that you should do your own clean up of the temp tables you create in a sproc, etc. But, then I found other bits that suggest otherwise.

Any insight would be greatly appreciated. I am just concerned I am not following best practice with the temp tables I create.

Thanks,

S

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    SQL Server will automatically drop local #temp tables when they go out of scope so it doesn't really matter AFAIK. Not sure whether this auto dropping happens synchronously before the scope exits or not though so that could perhaps make a slight difference compared to an explicit drop but for large tables I think the drop is deferred anyway. – Martin Smith Sep 8 '11 at 13:08
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    Any example of an argument in favour of one or the other method (especially in favour of explicit deleting) would be appreciated as well. I, for one, cannot really justify explicit deleting as the 'best practice', nor can I state that it is always redundant. On the other hand, those with a higher level of expertise in the area might give you a really good answer if you indeed told us why exactly you (or someone else whose opinion on the matter has at some point seemed sensible to you) regard one method better than the other. – Andriy M Sep 8 '11 at 13:39
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My view is, first see if you really need a temp table - or - can you make do with a Common Table Expression (CTE). Second, I would always drop my temp tables. Sometimes you need to have a temp table scoped to the connection (e.g. ##temp), so if you run the query a second time, and you have explicit code to create the temp table, you'll get an error that says the table already exists. Cleaning up after yourself is ALWAYS a good software practice.

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    Beware that ##temp is visible to everyone (i.e. other connections), but will be dropped when the original session ends. – Vedran Jan 25 '17 at 8:34
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    Having to maintain a catalog at the bottom of a stored proc of all the temp tables that were ever used in it so that they can be dropped is extra boilerplate and will be prone to error. Cleaning up after yourself is only a good software practice when it's necessary and you aren't making the whole process less efficient by doing so. Always doing something without understanding the purpose and context and knowing if there are better ways is how we get bloated hard to maintain code. Cleaning up, as a resource consuming task, is no different. – Jeffrey Vest Apr 30 '18 at 16:16
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    Or just use @table_variables and get them cleaned up properly with no boilerplate. – underscore_d Jan 10 '19 at 20:07
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CREATE TABLE (Transact-SQL)

Temporary tables are automatically dropped when they go out of scope, unless explicitly dropped by using DROP TABLE:

  • A local temporary table created in a stored procedure is dropped automatically when the stored procedure is finished. The table can be referenced by any nested stored procedures executed by the stored procedure that created the table. The table cannot be referenced by the process that called the stored procedure that created the table.
  • All other local temporary tables are dropped automatically at the end of the current session.
  • Global temporary tables are automatically dropped when the session that created the table ends and all other tasks have stopped referencing them. The association between a task and a table is maintained only for the life of a single Transact-SQL statement. This means that a global temporary table is dropped at the completion of the last Transact-SQL statement that was actively referencing the table when the creating session ended.
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  • sometimes you have little control over scope (connection pooling) – Alex Gordon Jan 26 '17 at 21:44
  • @MeggieLuski that is a misconception as temp tables will be dropped due to calling of sp_reset_connection when a connection from a pool is reused. – Vedran Jan 30 '17 at 9:14
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    yes but sometimes you dont have control over when sp reset connection is run, especially if you have multiple layers in yoru architecture – Alex Gordon Jan 30 '17 at 15:33
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    Reference: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/statements/… -- "Temporary tables are automatically dropped when they go out of scope, unless explicitly dropped by using DROP TABLE" -- "A local temporary table created in a stored procedure is dropped automatically when the stored procedure is finished. The table can be referenced by any nested stored procedures executed by the stored procedure that created the table." – kol Apr 12 at 14:30
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    will be automatically dropped when out of scope - is this accurate enough? going "out of scope" can also mean "a script has finished execution after hitting F5 in the query editor window", in which case the temp table will still be there. The linked article by @kol specifically says: "All other local temporary tables are dropped automatically at the end of the current session", which is much more specific than simply "going out of scope". – OfirD May 27 at 20:59
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I used to fall into the crowd of letting the objects get cleaned up by background server processes, however, recently having issues with extreme TempDB log file growth has changed my opinion. I'm not sure if this has always been the case with every version of SQL Server, but since moving to SQL 2016 and putting the drives on a PureStorage SSD array, things run a bit differently. Processes are typically CPU bound rather than I/O bound, and explicitly dropping the temp objects results in no issues with log growth. While I haven't dug in too deeply as to why, I suspect it's not unlike garbage collection in the .NET world where it's synchronous when called explicitly and asynchronous when left to the system. This would matter because the explicit drop would release the storage in the log file, and make it available at the next log backup, whereas this appears to not be the case when not explicitly dropping the object. On most systems this is likely not a big issue, but on a system supporting a high volume ERP and web storefront with many concurrent transactions, and heavy TempDB use, it has had a big impact. As for why to create the TempDB objects in the first place, with the amount of data in most of the queries, it would spill over into TempDB storage anyway, so it's usually more efficient to create the object with the necessary indexes rather than let the system handle it automatically.

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In a multi-threaded scenario where each thread creates its own set of tables and the number of threads is throttled, not dropping your own tables means that the governor will consider your thread done and spawn more threads... however the temp tables are still around (and thus the connections to the server) thus you'll exceed the limits of your governor. if you manually drop the temp tables then the thread doesn't finish until they've been dropped and no new threads are spawned, thus maintaining the governor's ability to keep from overwhelming the SQL engine

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    i found this hard to follow. – FistOfFury Nov 20 '12 at 18:55
  • @FistOfFury, a governor is a device that throttles the creation of threads. one use case where it's advantageous is where you may have a bunch of tasks to perform in a database but you don't want to overwhelm the server... in that case you have some kind of CPU utilisation detection scheme (or a simple thread limit) and spawn new threads only according to it – ekkis Nov 21 '12 at 23:28
  • i think i get it. so this is a particular use case when you have a process creating temp tables repeatedly in parallel, which ultimately overwhelms the database. That makes sense. – FistOfFury Nov 28 '12 at 15:22
  • I'm missing two things here: (1) How does the governor have knowledge of whether some thread hasn't dropped its temp tables? Isn't the governor just a thread spawner\killer? (2) Even if the governor has such knowledge, what makes it consider as done a thread that hasn't dropped its the temp tables? Shouldn't it be the other way around? – OfirD May 25 at 20:13
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As per my view. No need to drop temp tables explicitly. SQL server will handle to drop temp tables stored in temp db in case of shorage of space to process query.

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