23

We can access session data in controllers and views like this:

Session["SessionKey1"]

How do you access Session values from a class other than a controller or view?

5 Answers 5

35

I'd use dependency injection and pass the instance of the HttpContext (or just the session) to the class that needs access to the Session. The other alternative is to reference HttpContext.Current, but that will make it harder to test since it's a static object.

   public ActionResult MyAction()
   {

       var foo = new Foo( this.HttpContext );
       ...
   }


   public class Foo
   {
        private HttpContextBase Context { get; set; }

        public Foo( HttpContextBase context )
        {
            this.Context = context;
        }

        public void Bar()
        {
            var value = this.Context.Session["barKey"];
            ...
        }
   }
6
  • 1
    Thank you for responding. Looks like there are a few Dependency Injection frameworks. Which DI framework do you suggest? Is there a must read articles on DI? :)
    – xraminx
    Apr 9, 2009 at 17:30
  • 1
    this seems overly complicated for what the original poster was asking for. Apr 9, 2009 at 17:38
  • 1
    @xraminx -- don't confuse what I'm suggesting with a DI framework. I'm talking about using DI, the pattern, not a framework. The idea is that you pass an instance of the dependency to the class rather than have it create one or use a static instance. Much easier to unit test via mocking.
    – tvanfosson
    Apr 9, 2009 at 17:45
  • 5
    Heh heh, I've never quite 'got' the term dependency injection until I read that answer, +1 Jun 7, 2010 at 23:09
  • 2
    I believe Nick's answer (below) has to be the right answer. It is straight forward and didn't require me to inject some more dependencies ...
    – a.boussema
    Oct 25, 2014 at 19:10
25

You just need to call it through the HttpContext like so:

HttpContext.Current.Session["MyValue"] = "Something";
4
  • 1
    @Nick -- try unit testing by mocking up the static HttpContext and see how easy that is. I've done it -- no thanks.
    – tvanfosson
    Apr 9, 2009 at 17:46
  • 2
    FYI -- there's a reason why the framework designers introduced HttpSessionStateBase and HttpContextBase into the newer versions of the framework and why you can change the HttpContext in a controller by modifying the controller context. It makes it much easier to unit test your actions.
    – tvanfosson
    Apr 9, 2009 at 17:48
  • 18
    Original poster never asked about testing. He asked how he could access the session. Apr 10, 2009 at 16:09
  • here you are setting the value right? I want to access the same value. How to do that Jan 24, 2017 at 21:12
1

Here is my version of a solution for this problem. Notice that I also use a dependency injection as well, the only major difference is that the "session" object is accessed through a Singleton

private iSession _Session;

private iSession InternalSession
{
    get
    {

        if (_Session == null)
        {                
           _Session = new SessionDecorator(this.Session);
        }
        return _Session;
    }
}

Here is the SessionDecorator class, which uses a Decorator pattern to wrap the session around an interface :

public class SessionDecorator : iSession
{
    private HttpSessionStateBase _Session;
    private const string SESSIONKEY1= "SESSIONKEY1";
    private const string SESSIONKEY2= "SESSIONKEY2";

    public SessionDecorator(HttpSessionStateBase session)
    {
        _Session = session;
    }

    int iSession.AValue
    {
           get
        {
            return _Session[SESSIONKEY1] == null ? 1 : Convert.ToInt32(_Session[SESSIONKEY1]);
        }
        set
        {
            _Session[SESSIONKEY1] = value;
        }
    }

    int iSession.AnotherValue
    {
        get
        {
            return _Session[SESSIONKEY2] == null ? 0 : Convert.ToInt32(_Session[SESSIONKEY2]);
        }
        set
        {
            _Session[SESSIONKEY2] = value;
        }
    }
}`

Hope this helps :)

0

Haven't done it myself, but this sample from Chad Meyer's blog might help (from this post: http://www.chadmyers.com/Blog/archive/2007/11/30/asp.net-webforms-and-mvc-in-the-same-project.aspx)

[ControllerAction]
public void Edit(int id)
{
    IHttpSessionState session = HttpContext.Session;

    if (session["LoggedIn"] == null || ((bool)session["LoggedIn"] != true))
        RenderView("NotLoggedIn");

    Product p = SomeFancyDataAccess.GetProductByID(id);

    RenderView("Edit", p);
}
0

I would also wrap all session variables into a single class file. That way you can use intelliSense to select them. This cuts down on the number of paces in code where you need to specify the "strings" for the session.

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