53

I am getting some errors thrown in my code when I open a Windows Forms form in Visual Studio's designer. I would like to branch in my code and perform a different initialization if the form is being opened by designer than if it is being run for real.

How can I determine at run-time if the code is being executed as part of designer opening the form?

24 Answers 24

49

To find out if you're in "design mode":

  • Windows Forms components (and controls) have a DesignMode property.
  • Windows Presentation Foundation controls should use the IsInDesignMode attached property.
  • +1 for noting it to be different in WPF. I didn't knew. – Camilo Martin Oct 27 '10 at 13:46
  • 37
    DesignMode is not 100% reliable. – dwidel Jan 5 '11 at 17:27
  • 1
    ...see JohnV's answer for discussion of (and solutions to) the DesignMode problems. – Roger Lipscombe Jan 6 '11 at 10:16
  • 2
    See NET3's answer for a working solution. No disrespect to JohnV intended. – JMD Oct 8 '14 at 2:47
43
if (System.ComponentModel.LicenseManager.UsageMode == System.ComponentModel.LicenseUsageMode.Designtime)
{
  // Design time logic
}
  • 2
    +1. Alternately, LicenseUsageMode.Runtime, for anything that should run only at runtime. – JMD Oct 8 '14 at 2:45
  • +1 This worked a treat for me. Had been using DesignMode which it turns out is completely undependable. Switched all usages to this "UsageMode" alternative. – Tomás May 7 '15 at 8:57
  • The LicenseManager solution has worked for me in suppressing code that is executed during .cctor module loading and was causing bad behavior in the WPF designer. – Aaron Hudon Oct 8 '15 at 17:07
  • This one worked for me, .DesignMode property didn't work for me. – Patrick from NDepend team Jan 11 '16 at 11:13
19

The Control.DesignMode property is probably what you're looking for. It tells you if the control's parent is open in the designer.

In most cases it works great, but there are instances where it doesn't work as expected. First, it doesn't work in the controls constructor. Second, DesignMode is false for "grandchild" controls. For example, DesignMode on controls hosted in a UserControl will return false when the UserControl is hosted in a parent.

There is a pretty easy workaround. It goes something like this:

public bool HostedDesignMode
{
  get 
  {
     Control parent = Parent;
     while (parent!=null)
     {
        if(parent.DesignMode) return true;
        parent = parent.Parent;
     }
     return DesignMode;
  }
}

I haven't tested that code, but it should work.

  • 5
    it doesnt work DesignMode is protected. But the problem you mention is exactly what i am getting. But I also get it if put code in OnLoad() instead of .cor() – particle Apr 20 '10 at 13:38
15

The most reliable approach is:

public bool isInDesignMode
{
    get
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Process process = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess();
        bool res = process.ProcessName == "devenv";
        process.Dispose();
        return res;
    }
}
  • 1
    This can also be used to determine whether you are running within IDE debugger, if you use 'process.ProcessName.Contains("vshost")' as criteria. – zmilojko Sep 7 '12 at 14:08
  • 2
    Amendment für VS2013: As XAML editor finally got its own process, you need to check for "XDesProc" – Seven May 13 '15 at 14:53
  • 4
    While this is a perfectly reasonable solution and likely very reliable, there's something about this answer that sends shivers down my spine. – Neil Oct 1 '15 at 15:10
13

The most reliable way to do this is to ignore the DesignMode property and use your own flag that gets set on application startup.

Class:

public static class Foo
{
    public static bool IsApplicationRunning { get; set; }
}

Program.cs:

[STAThread]
static void Main()
{
     Foo.IsApplicationRunning = true;
     // ... code goes here ...
}

Then just check the flag whever you need it.

if(Foo.IsApplicationRunning)
{
    // Do runtime stuff
}
else
{
    // Do design time stuff
}
  • 1
    I spent a lot of time on trying different solutions, but eventually I also came up with the idea of just setting a flag. It's the only way that works 100%. – dwidel Dec 30 '11 at 21:30
  • 2
    This doesn't work for code libraries though, and this would then have to be included in the call to all methods that would need it. – Johny Skovdal Sep 27 '12 at 9:04
  • 1
    Use a global variable and set it once. – dwidel Nov 6 '12 at 16:11
  • 1
    I don't really see the point of this one. Unless I'm missing something, it doesn't answer the question of how to tell if running in the debugger - it requires you to manually sets a flag to indicate that. – WiredEarp Jan 18 '17 at 0:21
5

The devenv approach stopped working in VS2012 as the designer now has its own process. Here is the solution I am currently using (the 'devenv' part is left there for legacy, but without VS2010 I am not able to test that though).

private static readonly string[] _designerProcessNames = new[] { "xdesproc", "devenv" };

private static bool? _runningFromVisualStudioDesigner = null;
public static bool RunningFromVisualStudioDesigner
{
  get
  {
    if (!_runningFromVisualStudioDesigner.HasValue)
    {
      using (System.Diagnostics.Process currentProcess = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess())
      {
        _runningFromVisualStudioDesigner = _designerProcessNames.Contains(currentProcess.ProcessName.ToLower().Trim());
      }
    }

    return _runningFromVisualStudioDesigner.Value;
  }
}
  • How did you find this out? – Sebastian Nov 24 '13 at 12:12
  • 1
    Too long ago for me to remember that I'm afraid. I think I just noticed the odd processes in Task Manager and looked them up, but I can't say for sure though. – Johny Skovdal Nov 24 '13 at 12:52
  • Because I'm really grateful for this remark, I was already wondering why some of my Components where causing crashes in the new Visual Studio, sadly uncaught Exceptions can cause a crash of the whole Visual Studio (i.e. an error in an unmanaged Dispose method) – Sebastian Nov 24 '13 at 12:56
  • 1
    Glad you found it useful. :) Sorry I can't be of more help as to how I found the error in the first place. – Johny Skovdal Nov 24 '13 at 13:15
4

I had the same problem in Visual Studio Express 2013. I tried many of the solutions suggested here but the one that worked for me was an answer to a different thread, which I will repeat here in case the link is ever broken:

protected static bool IsInDesigner
{
    get { return (Assembly.GetEntryAssembly() == null); }
}
3
using (System.Diagnostics.Process process = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess())
{
    bool inDesigner = process.ProcessName.ToLower().Trim() == "devenv";
    return inDesigner;
}

I tried the above code (added a using statement) and this would fail on some occasions for me. Testing in the constructor of a usercontrol placed directly in a form with the designer loading at startup. But would work in other places.

What worked for me, in all locations is:

private bool isDesignMode()
{
    bool bProcCheck = false;
    using (System.Diagnostics.Process process = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess())
    {
        bProcCheck = process.ProcessName.ToLower().Trim() == "devenv";
    }

    bool bModeCheck = (System.ComponentModel.LicenseManager.UsageMode == System.ComponentModel.LicenseUsageMode.Designtime);

    return bProcCheck || DesignMode || bModeCheck;
}

Maybe a bit overkill, but it works, so is good enough for me.

The success in the example noted above is the bModeCheck, so probably the DesignMode is surplus.

  • I think this is the best solution as it covers all situations. Worked perfectly for me. – Caesar Apr 8 '13 at 18:51
3
/// <summary>
/// Are we in design mode?
/// </summary>
/// <returns>True if in design mode</returns>
private bool IsDesignMode() {
    // Ugly hack, but it works in every version
    return 0 == String.CompareOrdinal(
        "devenv.exe", 0,
        Application.ExecutablePath, Application.ExecutablePath.Length - 10, 10);
}
2

It's hack-ish, but if you're using VB.NET and when you're running from within Visual Studio My.Application.Deployment.CurrentDeployment will be Nothing, because you haven't deployed it yet. I'm not sure how to check the equivalent value in C#.

1

We use the following code in UserControls and it does the work. Using only DesignMode will not work in your app that uses your custom user controls as pointed out by other members.

    public bool IsDesignerHosted
    {
        get { return IsControlDesignerHosted(this); }
    }

    public bool IsControlDesignerHosted(System.Windows.Forms.Control ctrl)
    {
        if (ctrl != null)
        {
            if (ctrl.Site != null)
            {
                if (ctrl.Site.DesignMode == true)
                    return true;
                else
                {
                    if (IsControlDesignerHosted(ctrl.Parent))
                        return true;
                    else
                        return false;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                if (IsControlDesignerHosted(ctrl.Parent))
                    return true;
                else
                    return false;
            }
        }
        else
            return false;
    }
  • Did not work with VS 2010 and grandchild control – dcompiled Jun 18 '15 at 22:22
1

You check the DesignMode property of your control:

if (!DesignMode)
{
//Do production runtime stuff
}

Note that this won't work in your constructor because the components haven't been initialized yet.

  • 1
    This doesn't work on VS2010 :( – Uri May Nov 8 '13 at 9:53
1
System.ComponentModel.Component.DesignMode == true
  • 3
    It says it's not accessible because it's Protected – Scott Whitlock Feb 22 '13 at 13:31
1
System.Diagnostics.Debugger.IsAttached
1

When running a project, its name is appended with ".vshost".

So, I use this:

    public bool IsInDesignMode
    {
        get
        {
            Process p = Process.GetCurrentProcess();
            bool result = false;

            if (p.ProcessName.ToLower().Trim().IndexOf("vshost") != -1)
                result = true;
            p.Dispose();

            return result;
        }
    }

It works for me.

  • 3
    This lets you know if a program is being run from VS, not if methods are invoked form the VS designer, which is what Zvi is trying to achieve. – Johny Skovdal Sep 27 '12 at 9:36
1

I'm not sure if running in debug mode counts as real, but an easy way is to include an if statement in your code that checkes for System.Diagnostics.Debugger.IsAttached.

  • 6
    The relation to the visual studio designer is at most indirect... – Román Jan 6 '11 at 19:50
1

If you created a property that you don't need at all at design time, you can use the DesignerSerializationVisibility attribute and set it to Hidden. For example:

protected virtual DataGridView GetGrid()
{
    throw new NotImplementedException("frmBase.GetGrid()");
}

[DesignerSerializationVisibility(DesignerSerializationVisibility.Hidden)]
public int ColumnCount { get { return GetGrid().Columns.Count; } set { /*Some code*/ } }

It stopped my Visual Studio crashing every time I made a change to the form with NotImplementedException() and tried to save. Instead, Visual Studio knows that I don't want to serialize this property, so it can skip it. It only displays some weird string in the properties box of the form, but it seems to be safe to ignore.

Please note that this change does not take effect until you rebuild.

0

If you are in a form or control you can use the DesignMode property:

if (DesignMode)
{
        DesignMode Only stuff
}
  • This doesn't seem to work in controls - always returns false :( – Danny Tuppeny Jul 16 '11 at 12:32
0

I found the DesignMode property to be buggy, at least in previous versions of Visual Studio. Hence, I made my own using the following logic:

Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName.ToLower().Trim() == "devenv";

Kind of a hack, I know, but it works well.

  • That won't work if the designer is hosted somewhere other than Visual Studio. For instance, the web page designer is also used in SharePoint Designer and Expression Web. The workflow designer can be hosted anywhere. – John Saunders Jul 16 '09 at 11:46
  • Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName.ToLower().Trim() == "devenv"; causes a memory leak. You must dispose the process object. – Matthew Dec 17 '09 at 11:03
  • 2
    This is the single cause of a MASSIVE memory leak on my application. – xster Apr 4 '10 at 7:33
  • 1
    This is KEY! This line does cause a massive memory leak. Use dispose! – xster Apr 4 '10 at 7:34
  • 2
    @xster remember to dispose -- using (var p = Process.GetCurrentProcess()) { ... } – Keith Apr 19 '12 at 21:52
0

To solve the problem, you can also code as below:

private bool IsUnderDevelopment
{
    get
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Process process = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess();
        if (process.ProcessName.EndsWith(".vshost")) return true;
        else return false;
    }

}
  • 2
    that checks if run in the debugger, but we talk about the VS Designer – Sebastian Nov 30 '13 at 13:01
0

Here's another one:

        //Caters only to thing done while only in design mode
        if (App.Current.MainWindow == null){ // in design mode  }

        //Avoids design mode problems
        if (App.Current.MainWindow != null) { //applicaiton is running }
0

After testing most of the answers here, unfortunately nothing worked for me (VS2015). So I added a little twist to JohnV's answer, which didn't work out of the box, since DesignMode is a protected Property in the Control class.

First I made an extension method which returns the DesignMode's Property value via Reflection:

public static Boolean GetDesignMode(this Control control)
{
    BindingFlags bindFlags = BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Static;
    PropertyInfo prop = control.GetType().GetProperty("DesignMode", bindFlags);
    return (Boolean)prop.GetValue(control, null);
}

and then I made a function like JohnV:

public bool HostedDesignMode
{
    get
    {
        Control parent = Parent;
        while (parent != null)
        {
            if (parent.GetDesignMode()) return true;
            parent = parent.Parent;
        }
        return DesignMode;
    }
}

This is the only method that worked for me, avoiding all the ProcessName mess, and while reflection should not be used lightly, in this case it did all the difference! ;)

EDIT:

You can also make the second function an extension method like this:

public static Boolean IsInDesignMode(this Control control)
{
    Control parent = control.Parent;
    while (parent != null)
    {
        if (parent.GetDesignMode())
        {
            return true;
        }
        parent = parent.Parent;
    }
    return control.GetDesignMode();
}
  • How slow is calling that function at runtime? – rolls Jul 28 '17 at 5:11
  • From experience, the performance impact is insignificant. ;) – Gpower2 Jul 29 '17 at 8:54
-2
    /// <summary>
    ///  Whether or not we are being run from the Visual Studio IDE
    /// </summary>
    public bool InIDE
    {
        get
        {
            return Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName.ToLower().Trim().EndsWith("vshost");
        }
    }
-2

Here's a flexible way that is adaptable to where you compile from as well as whether or not you care which mode you're in.

string testString1 = "\\bin\\";
//string testString = "\\bin\\Debug\\";
//string testString = "\\bin\\Release\\";

if (AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory.Contains(testString))
{
    //Your code here
}
  • 1
    This does not seem to be anywhat near reliable? What if the user changes the directory where he runs from? – Petr May 12 '15 at 17:08

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