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Using java.sql and official oracle documentation does not state this explicitly but I feel like successive update queries do not update db automatically after using a method that performs a transaction using setAutoCommit(false), commit() and rollback(), do I have to call setAutoCommit(true) after calling either commit() or rollback()?

EDIT: can confirm that calling setAutoCommit(true) after performing the transaction produces the correct and expected behaviour

generic code that worked for me:

setAutoCommit(false);
try {
    //do transaction stuff
    commit();
} catch (SQLException e) {
    rollback();
} finally {
    setAutoCommit(true);
}
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  • Nowadays most people use transaction demarcation in the form of annotations, rather than using the plain JDBC mechanichs. It can be interesing to learn how this works in the basic form, but this is not a common concern anymore. Commented Aug 28, 2022 at 15:09
  • If you disable auto-commit you tell the connection "I'm managing the transactions, don't do it for me". So if you want the connection to start managing transaction again, you need to tell it so explicitly by enabling auto-commit again. Commented Aug 28, 2022 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

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Changing the auto commit, will effect the active session, it will not revert to true after any command besides setAutoCommit(true).

So in short, no, you have to set it manually or reconnect, as it is set to true by default with every connection.

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It's quite the opposite, if you think about it. If you call setAutoCommit(false), it means that commit is not called after you post the result of the query, and you need to call commit() or rollback() manually.

If there's not update in your database it means exatly that autoCommit is set to false!

If you feel that there's no update the meaning is that you started a transaction somewhere and forgot to call either commit or rollback, meaning that the transaction is still locking the records and the database cannot accept other modifications.

A session is a lock mechanism that prevents you to modify the database (or part of it, depending on how it was implemented) until the previous session hansn't ended!

My suggestion is to look for the place where you started a session but didn't end it either with commit() or rollback(). That's probably what is preventing furhter updates to be posted.

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