1

I want to shorten the conditions of a javascript if but I don't know how I can achieve it

code:

    if ((!emailValidation() || (!nameValidation()) || (!surnameValidation()) || (!addressValidation()) || (!cityValidation()) || (!postalCodeValidation()))) {        
}

I have the conditions defined in this way:

let surnameValidation = () => {
    if (apellidoUsuario.value.length == 0) {
        surnameError();
        return false;
    }

    else if (apellidoUsuario.value.length == 1) {
        surnameError();
        return false;
    }

    else {
        apellidoUsuario.focus;
        apellidoUsuario.style.border = '0';
        apellidoUsuario.style.backgroundColor = 'transparent';
        apellidoUsuario.style.outline = '1px solid #00ffb1'
        apellidoUsuario.style.transitionDuration = '0.4s'
        return true;
    }

I appreciate any help! :)

3
  • btw, after return in condition, you need no else part. Commented Aug 31, 2022 at 14:39
  • firstly you don't need to wrap all the function calls in (, ) Commented Aug 31, 2022 at 14:40
  • Perhaps deMorgan's Law could help?
    – mykaf
    Commented Aug 31, 2022 at 14:50

2 Answers 2

1

You can remove all unnecessary parenthesis in your if condition:

if (
    !emailValidation() ||
    !nameValidation() ||
    !surnameValidation() ||
    !addressValidation() ||
    !cityValidation() ||
    !postalCodeValidation()
) {
}

Other than that, there's not really a clean, readable way to shorten your code.

0

Proposition #1:

I would probably get those validations into a variable or function:

validations() {
   return [
     emailValidation(),
     nameValidation(),
     surnameValidation(),
     addressValidation(),
     cityValidation(),
     postalCodeValidation()];
}

and then I would:

if(validations().some(x=> !x)){
 ...
}

since validations return an array you can just use the some operator to find any invalid value.

Proposition #2:

I particularly would:

valid() {
   return [
     emailValidation(),
     nameValidation(),
     surnameValidation(),
     addressValidation(),
     cityValidation(),
     postalCodeValidation()].every(x => x === true);
}

and then I would:

if(!valid()){
 ...
}

It is always cleaner to use true conditions on if statements instead of false ones.

References: Clean Code - Uncle Bob.

7
  • By shortening that if condition, you just increased the length of the file, and made it more difficult to see what is being checked in the if :D
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Aug 31, 2022 at 14:46
  • yes, I have them inside an onclick function. it is simply to check a form, thank you very much for the help! Commented Aug 31, 2022 at 14:49
  • [...].every(); -> "Uncaught TypeError: undefined is not a function"
    – Thomas
    Commented Aug 31, 2022 at 14:50
  • @Cerbrus I have to agree to disagree. Good programers write code to people understand, not to computers. That extra increase will all be dismissed on bundling and even would make easier other programers to read it in source control. Also compilers would probably make the same output of both codes. Commented Aug 31, 2022 at 14:50
  • @Thomas sorry about that. It should be "valid().every(x=> x)". I have just edited the answer. Commented Aug 31, 2022 at 14:52

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