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I want to change certain css in admin django like base.css. Is it better to change directly in the django library? How can I override it in the best way?

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9 Answers 9

134

It depends a lot of what you want to do. Though first of all: do not overwrite it in the Django admin directly. You got two options I think are reasonable:

  1. If you want to change the appearance of the admin in general you should override admin templates. This is covered in details here: Overriding admin templates. Sometimes you can just extend the original admin file and then overwrite a block like {% block extrastyle %}{% endblock %} in django/contrib/admin/templates/admin/base.html as an example.
  2. If your style is model specific you can add additional styles via the Media meta class in your admin.py. See an example here:
class MyModelAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    class Media:
        js = ('js/admin/my_own_admin.js',)    
        css = {
             'all': ('css/admin/my_own_admin.css',)
        }
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  • 1
    Actually, it's not model level but the whole site itself. To be specific changes in base.css,ie.css etc. One option is to include the admin/base.html in my application itself and use my custom base.css in the admin/base.html file. That way I will have to include some template files from the django admin to my own site. Is there any better solution than this ? Sep 9, 2011 at 5:35
  • 1
    None I am aware of. The django admin is in the end nothing else than a django reusable app. That's the way to go with any other reusable app as well. Sep 9, 2011 at 6:54
  • I notice there's a .css file listed within the js here... does that actually work? I can't get it to. Jul 18, 2012 at 9:03
  • Yes, you are right. I made a mistake and edited my answer with an example from the django docs. Jul 20, 2012 at 17:01
  • In the words of Eli Porter, "You grilled the best cat". Nov 14, 2019 at 14:45
59
  • In settings.py, make sure your app is listed before admin in the INSTALLED_APPS.
  • Create (your-app)/templates/admin/base_site.html and put the <style> block into the {% block extrahead %}

Example:

{% extends "admin/base_site.html" %}
{% block extrahead %}
    <style>
        .field-__str__ {
            font-family: Consolas, monospace;
        }
    </style>
{% endblock %}
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  • 10
    Best answer. If you want you can also avoid to list your app before admin in INSTALLED_APPS by putting a "template" directory in base project and referencing it in settings.py: TEMPLATES = [ ...other stuffs..., 'DIRS': [os.path.join(BASE_DIR, 'templates')], ]
    – RedPelle
    Mar 11, 2018 at 23:34
  • Great idea! Works smoothly like a charm!
    – ozw1z5rd
    Apr 2, 2020 at 15:52
  • If you use a custom authentication user model and want to unregister the authentication group model in admin.py, make sure to list django.contrib.auth before your app.
    – Chris Fowl
    Aug 11, 2021 at 21:21
35

This solution will work for the admin site, I think it's the cleanest way because it overrides base_site.html which doesn't change when upgrading django.

Create in your templates directory a folder called admin in it create a file named base_site.html.

Create in your static directory under css a file called admin-extra.css .

Write in it all the custom css you want for your forms like: body{background: #000;}.

Paste this in the base_site.html:

{% extends "admin/base.html" %}
{% load static from staticfiles %} # This might be just {% load static %} in your ENV

{% block title %}{{ title }} | {{ site_title|default:_('Django site admin') }}{% endblock %}

{% block extrastyle %}{{ block.super }}<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="{% static "css/admin-extra.css" %}" />{% endblock %}

{% block branding %}
<h1 id="site-name"><a href="{% url 'admin:index' %}">{{ site_header|default:_('Django administration') }}</a></h1>
{% endblock %}

{% block nav-global %}{% endblock %}

As mentioned in the comments: make sure your app is before the admin app in INSTALLED_APPS, otherwise your template doesn't override django's

That's It! you're done

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  • 6
    Thanks, works great! If it doesn't work, make sure your app is before the admin app in INSTALLED_APPS, otherwise your template doesn't override django's.
    – Dirbaio
    Oct 12, 2016 at 20:21
  • 2
    Best answer and comment. It is surprisingly difficult to change the coloring on the admin page. Going through this answer and comment did solidify how it works. Sep 30, 2019 at 20:12
  • 2
    How do you know that base_site.html will never change when upgrading django? (I mean yes this answer is 3 years old and still works but that's no garantuee)
    – Marv
    Mar 17, 2020 at 7:18
  • @marv if you look under the hood in the source code you can see very easily the admin architecture is built around these specific names especially in the urls and the template rendering. classes that inherit classes that inherit classes rely on these names staying the same unless there will be a major redesign of the Django framework (and even then I wouldn't bet on this changing) the overall basic convention of overriding admin views and admin urls as well as overriding the base template will stay the same for the next 3 years at the least according to django roadmap. Mar 24, 2020 at 18:42
  • 2
    So this is just general knowledge about django and there is no concrete source confirming this? It's not that i doubt you, I just wonder how one is supposed to find out that this is the case.
    – Marv
    Mar 25, 2020 at 12:37
29

I just extended admin/base.html to include a reference to my own css file - at the end. The beauty of css is that you don't have to touch existing definitions, just re-define.

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19

In your static directory, create a static/admin/css/base.css file.

Paste in Django's default Admin CSS first, then add your customizations at the bottom.

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  • 10
    If you do this, be sure to put your app BEFORE django.contrib.admin in the list of INSTALLED_APPS. If you don't, collectstatic will find the admin base.css first and your customized version won't overwrite it.
    – Dave
    Jul 31, 2015 at 22:40
  • 3
    This isn't a good long term solution. It copy/pastes a bunch of code and it won't be maintained as Django upgrades.
    – mlissner
    Jul 26, 2017 at 16:24
  • Any styling to the Django admin is basically a fork of the code. An update to Django could in effect break your customizations. My recommendation is to keep customizations to a minimum and add them at the bottom of Django's default styling. Then you can manually update the default styling if and when you want to.
    – Ryan Allen
    Jul 27, 2017 at 20:04
  • @danny-w-adair's answer above is better; keeps things "DRY", but it's still a fork of Django's code that could lead to minor upgrade pains.
    – Ryan Allen
    Jul 27, 2017 at 20:12
14

If you want a global scope and you don't want to think about overriding templates a mixin works really well for this. Put this code wherever you want:

class CSSAdminMixin(object):
    class Media:
        css = {
            'all': ('css/admin.css',),
        }

Then, make a CSS file called admin.css with your overrides, for example:

select[multiple] {
    resize: vertical;
}

Then, in whatever models you want, do:

class MyModelAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin, CSSAdminMixin):

And you'll be all set.

2
  • I like your answer, but why not to add directly to MyModelAdmin
    – Goran
    Oct 13, 2017 at 14:10
  • 1
    You could do that if it's one model, but it'll get messy if you do it to many models.
    – mlissner
    Oct 13, 2017 at 14:24
5

Have admin/css/changelists.css inside a folder in STATICFILES_DIRS, and it will user that changelists.css instead of the default admin one.

2

You can override base.css in Django Admin.

For example, there is Person model as shown below:

# "app1/models.py"

from django.db import models

class Person(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=20)

    def __str__(self):
        return self.name

Then, there is Person admin as shown below:

# "app1/admin.py"

from django.contrib import admin
from .models import Person

@admin.register(Person)
class PersonAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    pass

Then, there is Person admin as shown below:

enter image description here

Then, copy base.css from django/contrib/admin/static/admin/css/base.css in your virtual environment to static/admin/app1/css/ as shown below:

django-project
 |-core
 |  └-settings.py
 |-app1
 |  |-models.py
 |  └-admin.py
 |-app2
 └-static
    └-admin
       └-app1
          └-css
             └-base.css # Here

Then in base.css, replace background: var(--header-bg); with background: black; as shown below to change the header color to black in Person admin page:

/* "static/admin/app1/css/base.css" */

#header {
    width: auto;
    height: auto;
    display: flex;
    justify-content: space-between;
    align-items: center;
    padding: 10px 40px;
    /* background: var(--header-bg); */
    background: black;
    color: var(--header-color);
    overflow: hidden;
}

First, I explain how to change the header color to black in Person admin page.

So, set "admin/app1/css/base.css" to css in Media class as shown below:

# "app1/admin.py"

from django.contrib import admin
from .models import Person

@admin.register(Person)
class PersonAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    class Media:
        css = {    # ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ Here ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓
            "all": ("admin/app1/css/base.css",)
        }      

Then, the header color is changed to black in Person admin page as shown below:

enter image description here

And, the header color is not changed to black in Animal admin as shown below:

enter image description here

Next, I explain how to change the header color to black in all admin pages.

So, copy base.html from /django/contrib/admin/templates/admin/base.html in your virtual environment to /templates/admin/base.html as shown below:

django-project
 |-core
 |  └-settings.py
 |-app1
 |  |-models.py
 |  └-admin.py
 |-app2
 |-static
 |  └-admin
 |     └-app1
 |        └-css
 |           └-base.css # Here
 └-templates
    └-admin
       └-base.html # Here

Then in base.html, replace admin/css/base.css with admin/app1/css/base.css in {% static %}:

# "templates/admin/base.html"

# ...
<title>{% block title %}{% endblock %}</title>
{# <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% block stylesheet %}{% static "admin/css/base.css" %}{% endblock %}"> #}
{# ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ Here ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ #}
<link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "admin/app1/css/base.css" %}"> {# ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ Here ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ #}
{% block dark-mode-vars %}
#...

Then, the header color is changed to black in Person and Animal admins as shown below:

enter image description here

enter image description here

0

It just so happens that using <style> tag inside {% block extrastyle %}{% endblock %} did not work for me when I wanted to override css. Theming support provides the correct way. All I was missing is {{ block.super }} :-

{% extends 'admin/base.html' %}

{% block extrastyle %}{{ block.super }}
<style>
--- your style ---
--- properties here ---
</style>
{% endblock %}

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