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What is the best way to cut an integer variable from another integer variable or concatenate two integer variables?

I mean, in the performance way? - I consider two options:

  • cast an int to a String and perform a simple substring/concatenation operation and cast the String back to an int
  • or perform an algorithmic operation, this way:
    public static Integer concatenateInt(int a, int b) {
        if(b < 0){
            b *= -1;
        }
        int proxyB = b/10;
        a *= 10;
        for (; proxyB > 0; proxyB /= 10) {
            a *= 10;
        }

        if(a < 0){
            a -= b;
        } else {
            a += b;
        }
        return a;
    }

  • via String:
        return Integer.parseInt(a + "" + b);

The cutting of integer values will be a more complicated algorithm - so which way is preferred for best performance?

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  • I wouldn't bother with performance until you know it is a problem. I'd start with the requirements, i.e. what exactly is cutting and concatenating? Do you mean 1 + 2 results in 12? The same as 12 + 3 or 1 + 23 would result in 123? What's the background for this? Why is this done with integers in the first place as it seems to be more of how you'd use strings?
    – Thomas
    Sep 14, 2022 at 9:52
  • But I'd bet that you will find that the first version is a lot faster ... if you do the benchmarking correctly.
    – Stephen C
    Sep 14, 2022 at 9:52
  • Side note: for (; b > 1; b /= 10) would be wrong for a couple of reasons: 1) what if b is 0 or negative? 2) this loop changes b so after the loop it would be 0 (if it was positive to begin with)
    – Thomas
    Sep 14, 2022 at 9:54
  • (Well yea: I'm assuming that bugs are corrected before benchmarking :-) )
    – Stephen C
    Sep 14, 2022 at 9:55
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    @ValentynHruzytskyi I really enjoyed this question, always fun getting to know the internal working of Java. Here is a oneliner to do the same :) (int) (number1 * Math.pow(10.0, Math.log10(number2) + 1.0) + number2);
    – Reg
    Sep 14, 2022 at 13:36

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