Is there any directory bookmarking utility for bash to allow move around faster on the command line?

UPDATE

Thanks guys for the feedback however I created my own simple shell script (feel free to modify/expand it)

function cdb() {
    USAGE="Usage: cdb [-c|-g|-d|-l] [bookmark]" ;
    if  [ ! -e ~/.cd_bookmarks ] ; then
        mkdir ~/.cd_bookmarks
    fi

    case $1 in
        # create bookmark
        -c) shift
            if [ ! -f ~/.cd_bookmarks/$1 ] ; then
                echo "cd `pwd`" > ~/.cd_bookmarks/"$1" ;
            else
                echo "Try again! Looks like there is already a bookmark '$1'"
            fi
            ;;
        # goto bookmark
        -g) shift
            if [ -f ~/.cd_bookmarks/$1 ] ; then 
                source ~/.cd_bookmarks/"$1"
            else
                echo "Mmm...looks like your bookmark has spontaneously combusted. What I mean to say is that your bookmark does not exist." ;
            fi
            ;;
        # delete bookmark
        -d) shift
            if [ -f ~/.cd_bookmarks/$1 ] ; then 
                rm ~/.cd_bookmarks/"$1" ;
            else
                echo "Oops, forgot to specify the bookmark" ;
            fi    
            ;;
        # list bookmarks
        -l) shift
            ls -l ~/.cd_bookmarks/ ;
            ;;
         *) echo "$USAGE" ;
            ;;
    esac
}

INSTALL

1./ create a file ~/.cdb and copy the above script into it.

2./ in your ~/.bashrc add the following

if [ -f ~/.cdb ]; then
    source ~/.cdb
fi 

3./ restart your bash session

USAGE

1./ to create a bookmark

$cd my_project
$cdb -c project1

2./ to goto a bookmark

$cdb -g project1

3./ to list bookmarks

$cdb -l 

4./ to delete a bookmark

$cdb -d project1

5./ where are all my bookmarks stored?

$cd ~/.cd_bookmarks

11 Answers 11

Also, have a look at CDPATH

A colon-separated list of search paths available to the cd command, similar in function to the $PATH variable for binaries. The $CDPATH variable may be set in the local ~/.bashrc file.

ash$ cd bash-doc
bash: cd: bash-doc: No such file or directory

bash$ CDPATH=/usr/share/doc
bash$ cd bash-doc
/usr/share/doc/bash-doc

bash$ echo $PWD
/usr/share/doc/bash-doc

and

cd -

It's the command-line equivalent of the back button (takes you to the previous directory you were in).

  • 3
    cheers for that. – getmizanur Sep 11 '11 at 6:26
  • 2
    I prefer this solution since I have well organized directory structure. – MeanEYE Feb 2 '15 at 12:26

Thanks for sharing your solution, and I'd like to share mine as well, which I find more useful than anything else I've came across before.

The engine is a great, universal tool: command-line fuzzy finder by Junegunn.

It primarily allows you to “fuzzy-find” files in a number of ways, but it also allows to feed arbitrary text data to it and filter this data. So, the shortcuts idea is simple: all we need is to maintain a file with paths (which are shortcuts), and fuzzy-filter this file. Here's how it looks: we type cdg command (from "cd global", if you like), get a list of our bookmarks, pick the needed one in just a few keystrokes, and press Enter. Working directory is changed to the picked item:

cdg

It is extremely fast and convenient: usually I just type 3-4 letters of the needed item, and all others are already filtered out. Additionally, of course we can move through list with arrow keys or with vim-like keybindings Ctrl+j/Ctrl+k.

Article with details: Fuzzy shortcuts for your shell.

It is possible to use it for GUI applications as well (via xterm): I use that for my GUI file manager Double Commander. I have plans to write an article about this use case, too.

  • Thank you thousand times for the fzf command! I have updated your answer with my simple cdg implementation. Hope it helps other people :) – Petr Újezdský Sep 15 '17 at 8:41
  • @PetrÚjezdský, I think it'd be better if you just write your own answer; firstly, this will be more clear for the readers, and secondly, it'll be easier for both of us if one day you want to edit your answer. Thanks. – Dmitry Frank Sep 16 '17 at 19:32
  • Well, I think it will clutter the answers more. But, I did what you want. My simple cdg implementation can be found in my answer. Happy cding to all :) – Petr Újezdský Sep 17 '17 at 21:13

In bash script/command,
you can use pushd and popd

pushd

Save and then change the current directory. With no arguments, pushd exchanges the top two directories.

Usage

cd /abc
pushd /xxx    <-- save /abc to environment variables and cd to /xxx
pushd /zzz
pushd +1      <-- cd /xxx

popd is to remove the variable (reverse manner)

  • This is what I use, but I would recommend cd - if the person only wants to jump back and forth between to directories. – gpojd Sep 10 '11 at 23:12

bookmarks.sh provides a bookmark management system for the Bash version 4.0+. It can also use a Midnight Commander hotlist.

Bashmarks is an amazingly simple and intuitive utility. In short, after installation, the usage is:

s <bookmark_name> - Saves the current directory as "bookmark_name"
g <bookmark_name> - Goes (cd) to the directory associated with "bookmark_name"
p <bookmark_name> - Prints the directory associated with "bookmark_name"
d <bookmark_name> - Deletes the bookmark
l                 - Lists all available bookmarks
  • The only change I had to make to this was change the name of the l function to something like lb because l is already an alias for a specific ls incantation in my bash shell. But yes, a very cool, intuitive and simple script! – mydoghasworms Aug 23 at 6:00

Inspired by the question and answers here, I added the lines below to my ~/.bashrc file.

With this you have a favdir command (function) to manage your favorites and a autocompletion function to select an item from these favorites.

# ---------
# Favorites
# ---------

__favdirs_storage=~/.favdirs
__favdirs=( "$HOME" )

containsElement () {
    local e
    for e in "${@:2}"; do [[ "$e" == "$1" ]] && return 0; done
    return 1
}

function favdirs() {

    local cur
    local IFS
    local GLOBIGNORE

    case $1 in
        list)
            echo "favorite folders ..."
            printf -- ' - %s\n' "${__favdirs[@]}"
            ;;
        load)
            if [[ ! -e $__favdirs_storage ]] ; then
                favdirs save
            fi
            # mapfile requires bash 4 / my OS-X bash vers. is 3.2.53 (from 2007 !!?!).
            # mapfile -t __favdirs < $__favdirs_storage
            IFS=$'\r\n' GLOBIGNORE='*' __favdirs=($(< $__favdirs_storage))
            ;;
        save)
            printf -- '%s\n' "${__favdirs[@]}" > $__favdirs_storage
            ;;
        add)
            cur=${2-$(pwd)}
            favdirs load
            if containsElement "$cur" "${__favdirs[@]}" ; then
                echo "'$cur' allready exists in favorites"
            else
                __favdirs+=( "$cur" )
                favdirs save
                echo "'$cur' added to favorites"
            fi
            ;;
        del)
            cur=${2-$(pwd)}
            favdirs load
            local i=0
            for fav in ${__favdirs[@]}; do
                if [ "$fav" = "$cur" ]; then
                    echo "delete '$cur' from favorites"
                    unset __favdirs[$i]
                    favdirs save
                    break
                fi
                let i++
            done
            ;;
        *)
            echo "Manage favorite folders."
            echo ""
            echo "usage: favdirs [ list | load | save | add | del ]"
            echo ""
            echo "  list : list favorite folders"
            echo "  load : load favorite folders from $__favdirs_storage"
            echo "  save : save favorite directories to $__favdirs_storage"
            echo "  add  : add directory to favorites [default pwd $(pwd)]."
            echo "  del  : delete directory from favorites [default pwd $(pwd)]."
    esac
} && favdirs load

function __favdirs_compl_command() {
    COMPREPLY=( $( compgen -W "list load save add del" -- ${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]}))
} && complete -o default -F __favdirs_compl_command favdirs

function __favdirs_compl() {
    local IFS=$'\n'
    COMPREPLY=( $( compgen -W "${__favdirs[*]}" -- ${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]}))
}

alias _cd='cd'
complete -F __favdirs_compl _cd

Within the last two lines, an alias to change the current directory (with autocompletion) is created. With this alias (_cd) you are able to change to one of your favorite directories. May you wan't to change this alias to something which fits your needs.

With the function favdirs you can manage your favorites (see usage).

$ favdirs 
Manage favorite folders.

usage: favdirs [ list | load | save | add | del ]

  list : list favorite folders
  load : load favorite folders from ~/.favdirs
  save : save favorite directories to ~/.favdirs
  add  : add directory to favorites [default pwd /tmp ].
  del  : delete directory from favorites [default pwd /tmp ].

Yes there is DirB: Directory Bookmarks for Bash well explained in this Linux Journal article

An example from the article:

% cd ~/Desktop
% s d       # save(bookmark) ~/Desktop as d
% cd /tmp   # go somewhere
% pwd
/tmp
% g d       # go to the desktop
% pwd
/home/Desktop

@getmizanur I used your cdb script. I enhanced it slightly by adding bookmarks tab completion. Here's my version of your cdb script.

_cdb()
{
    local _script_commands=$(ls -1 ~/.cd_bookmarks/)
    local cur=${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]}

    COMPREPLY=( $(compgen -W "${_script_commands}" -- $cur) )
}
complete -F _cdb cdb


function cdb() {

    local USAGE="Usage: cdb [-h|-c|-d|-g|-l|-s] [bookmark]\n
    \t[-h or no args] - prints usage help\n
    \t[-c bookmark] - create bookmark\n
    \t[-d bookmark] - delete bookmark\n
    \t[-g bookmark] - goto bookmark\n
    \t[-l] - list bookmarks\n
    \t[-s bookmark] - show bookmark location\n
    \t[bookmark] - same as [-g bookmark]\n
    Press tab for bookmark completion.\n"        

    if  [ ! -e ~/.cd_bookmarks ] ; then
        mkdir ~/.cd_bookmarks
    fi

    case $1 in
        # create bookmark
        -c) shift
            if [ ! -f ~/.cd_bookmarks/$1 ] ; then
                echo "cd `pwd`" > ~/.cd_bookmarks/"$1"
                complete -F _cdb cdb
            else
                echo "Try again! Looks like there is already a bookmark '$1'"
            fi
            ;;
        # goto bookmark
        -g) shift
            if [ -f ~/.cd_bookmarks/$1 ] ; then
                source ~/.cd_bookmarks/"$1"
            else
                echo "Mmm...looks like your bookmark has spontaneously combusted. What I mean to say is that your bookmark does not exist." ;
            fi
            ;;
        # show bookmark
        -s) shift
            if [ -f ~/.cd_bookmarks/$1 ] ; then
                cat ~/.cd_bookmarks/"$1"
            else
                echo "Mmm...looks like your bookmark has spontaneously combusted. What I mean to say is that your bookmark does not exist." ;
            fi
            ;;
        # delete bookmark
        -d) shift
            if [ -f ~/.cd_bookmarks/$1 ] ; then
                rm ~/.cd_bookmarks/"$1" ;
            else
                echo "Oops, forgot to specify the bookmark" ;
            fi
            ;;
        # list bookmarks
        -l) shift
            ls -1 ~/.cd_bookmarks/ ;
            ;;
        -h) echo -e $USAGE ;
            ;;
        # goto bookmark by default
        *)
            if [ -z "$1" ] ; then
                echo -e $USAGE
            elif [ -f ~/.cd_bookmarks/$1 ] ; then
                source ~/.cd_bookmarks/"$1"
            else
                echo "Mmm...looks like your bookmark has spontaneously combusted. What I mean to say is that your bookmark does not exist." ;
            fi
            ;;
    esac
}

Yes, one that I have written, that is called anc.

https://github.com/tobimensch/anc

Anc stands for anchor, but anc's anchors are really just bookmarks.

It's designed for ease of use and there're multiple ways of navigating, either by giving a text pattern, using numbers, interactively, by going back, or using [TAB] completion.

I'm actively working on it and open to input on how to make it better.

Allow me to paste the examples from anc's github page here:

# make the current directory the default anchor:
$ anc s

# go to /etc, then /, then /usr/local and then back to the default anchor:
$ cd /etc; cd ..; cd usr/local; anc

# go back to /usr/local :
$ anc b

# add another anchor:
$ anc a $HOME/test

# view the list of anchors (the default one has the asterisk):
$ anc l
(0) /path/to/first/anchor *
(1) /home/usr/test

# jump to the anchor we just added:
# by using its anchor number
$ anc 1
# or by jumping to the last anchor in the list
$ anc -1

# add multiple anchors:
$ anc a $HOME/projects/first $HOME/projects/second $HOME/documents/first

# use text matching to jump to $HOME/projects/first
$ anc pro fir

# use text matching to jump to $HOME/documents/first
$ anc doc fir

# add anchor and jump to it using an absolute path
$ anc /etc
# is the same as
$ anc a /etc; anc -1

# add anchor and jump to it using a relative path
$ anc ./X11 #note that "./" is required for relative paths
# is the same as
$ anc a X11; anc -1

# using wildcards you can add many anchors at once
$ anc a $HOME/projects/*

# use shell completion to see a list of matching anchors
# and select the one you want to jump to directly
$ anc pro[TAB]

In addition to @Dmitri Frank's answer - I have implemented the cdb command (aka cd bookmark) via simple alias (add this line to your ~/.bash_profile):

alias b='cat ~/.cd-bookmarks | grep -v "^\s*#" | grep -v "^\s*$" | fzf'
alias cdb='cd "$(b)"'

Create file ~/.cd-bookmarks and enter your paths, one per line. It supports empty lines and comments via #:

$ cat ~/.cd-bookmarks
### Devel stuff ###
/Users/pujezdsky/devel/projects/stackoverflow/

### Photo stuff ###
/Users/pujezdsky/Photos/
/Users/pujezdsky/Photos/last-import/
/Users/pujezdsky/Photos/dir with spaces/

Unfortunatelly it does not support ~ expansion so enter full paths.

Then you are able to do

$ cdb

And because of b alias even some more advanced stuff

$ mc `b`
$ cp my-file.txt `b`
$ touch `b`/test.sh

Unfortunately though, if you have spaces in your bookmark paths, you have to quote the `b` call. That makes it less handsome:

$mc "`b`"

Note 1:

Before you do this, check if you already have cdb, b commands / aliases to avoid their overwrite and malfunction. The easiest way is to use these commands that should return something like -bash: type: cdb: not found

$ type cdb
$ type b

Note 2:

The b alias can be simplified to

alias b='egrep -v "(^\s*#|^\s*$)" ~/.cd-bookmarks | fzf'

Note 3:

You can also make alias for adding current folder into your bookmarks. It is as simple as

alias ba='pwd >> ~/.cd-bookmarks'

For short term shortcuts, I have a the following in my respective init script (Sorry. I can't find the source right now and didn't bother then):

function b() {
    alias $1="cd `pwd -P`"
}

Usage:

In any directory that you want to bookmark type

b THEDIR # <THEDIR> being the name of your 'bookmark'

It will create an alias to cd (back) to here.

To return to a 'bookmarked' dir type

THEDIR

It will run the stored alias and cd back there.

Caution: Use only if you understand that this might override existing shell aliases and what that means.

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