5

Is the following code valid/good practice in C?

int x = 1;
printf(x == 1 ? "%d second elapsed" : "%d seconds elapsed", x);

It compiles fine, so I assume it is fine (also since it is just syntactical sugar for an if-else block), but if anyone has some additional insight, I would appreciate it, thank you.

P.S., I assume the same goes for C++?

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  • 2
    Yes, it’s fine. Commented Sep 16, 2022 at 15:40
  • 6
    I'd perhaps do it printf("%d second%s elapsed", x, x == 1 ? "" : "s"); but, yeah, it's fine.
    – Ted Lyngmo
    Commented Sep 16, 2022 at 15:44
  • 1
    @TedLyngmo ahhh now that's a much cleverer solution, thanks Commented Sep 16, 2022 at 15:46
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    an alternative: printf("%d second%s elapsed", x, "s" + (x == 1));
    – phuclv
    Commented Sep 16, 2022 at 15:48
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    Of course, translators won't thank you if you make the code too clever!
    – Ian Abbott
    Commented Sep 16, 2022 at 16:09

2 Answers 2

2

Yes!

Opinionated: After wading though tons of code written by programmers writing kernels, drivers and misc. utility programs that are usually considered "good", I think the consensus is that "it's fine". Not only is it safe - it can also be made easily readable.

A small, non-opinionated, note: Compilers are allowed to make string literals overlap. If you have two string literals, "Hello world" and "world" and compile your program will full optimization, you may find that the pointer to 'w' in "world" is actually within the "Hello world" string literal, since they are both valid, null-terminated strings. Example:

ptr1
 |
 V
 hello world\0
       ^
       |
      ptr2

However, that optimization cannot be applied to strings like yours, since the different part is in the middle of the string literal.

I therefore suggest:

printf("%d second%s elapsed", x, x == 1 ? "" : "s");

Another opinion of mine is that doing it like this also makes it easier to read.

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  • My first thought was “that can’t be right”. But I can’t get godbolt to overlap the literals either way. May I ask why use of the ternary operator would obviate folding string literals?
    – Dúthomhas
    Commented Sep 16, 2022 at 19:01
  • @Dúthomhas The use of the ternary operator doesn't prevent it, it's the actual string literals that can overlap that sets the limits. The string literal "foo" and "oo" has an obvious overlap. "foo" and "fo" ... nope. "fo" would here need its own space since it needs the terminating null terminator.
    – Ted Lyngmo
    Commented Sep 16, 2022 at 19:06
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    Done. Enjoy the zombies!
    – Dúthomhas
    Commented Sep 16, 2022 at 19:54
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    Very interesting answer, thanks! I had no idea that compilers could make string literals overlap during optimization. I'll definitely keep that in mind. Commented Sep 16, 2022 at 20:20
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    @Dúthomhas Thanks! All zombies are now dealt with. I thank you for your improvement of my answer and just had to make a small adjustment. Even they are in separate if statements, in different parts of the program, the string literals are allowed to overlap. I removed the part I thought may suggest otherwise.
    – Ted Lyngmo
    Commented Sep 17, 2022 at 8:09
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TL,DR: pass a string literal as the format string unless you really have no choice.

Is it valid C? Yes, sure. printf wants its first argument to be a string (a null-terminated array of characters), and it's getting it. Whatever the value of x is, this string contains exactly one printf format, which expects an int argument. And printf receives an int argument. So all is fine, as far as the C language is concerned.

Is it good practice? No. There are several advantages to passing a string literal as the format string to functions like printf, scanf, etc. If you pass a string literal, that gives the compiler (and other static analyzers) the opportunity to complain if you aren't passing correctly typed arguments. If you pass something more complex, the compiler may not be able to tell. Furthermore, passing a string literal gives the compiler more optimization opportunities: many compilers will break down printf calls into lower-level functions when the format string is constant: printf("%d seconds elapsed", x) will be compiled into something like __builtin_printf_int(x) + fputs("", stdout) (plus error checking). If the format string is variable, it has to be parsed at runtime.

In this simple example, compilers are likely to recognize that there are only two possible format strings and to perform the check and optimization. In fact, let's make the program wrong:

#include <stdio.h>
void foo(long x) {
    printf(x == 1 ? "%d second elapsed" : "%d seconds elapsed", x);
}

Here's what GCC has to say about it:

a.c: In function ‘foo’:
a.c:3:23: warning: format ‘%d’ expects argument of type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’ [-Wformat=]
     printf(x == 1 ? "%d second elapsed" : "%d seconds elapsed", x);
                      ~^
                      %ld
a.c:3:45: warning: format ‘%d’ expects argument of type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’ [-Wformat=]
     printf(x == 1 ? "%d second elapsed" : "%d seconds elapsed", x);
                                            ~^
                                            %ld

You're getting two warnings, one for each of the two formats. But in more complex cases, the compiler would give up and just pass the dynamically constructed string to printf at runtime, with no opportunity to bail out if the parameters are wrong.

As long as your program hard-codes English for messages, there's a simple solution: make the pluralization a separate argument.

printf("%d second%s elapsed", x, x == 1 ? "" : "s");

This doesn't work well with internationalization, since different languages have different rules (for example some languages need the singular for 0, some have a different form for 2 and 3-or-more, some need a plural on “elapsed”, etc.). If you need internationalization, you aren't passing a constant string to printf anyway.

1
  • Thank you very much for your answer - I really like your proposed solution. Commented Sep 16, 2022 at 20:23

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