3

Code:

product :: (Eq p, Num p) => p -> p
product 1 = 1
product n = n * product (n-1)

Usage:

main = print (product(8))

Error:

GHCi, version 8.10.6: https://www.haskell.org/ghc/  :? for help
Loaded GHCi configuration from /home/runner/University-Labs/.ghci
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( Main.hs, interpreted )

Main.hs:3:17: error:
    Ambiguous occurrence ‘product’
    It could refer to
       either ‘Prelude.product’,
              imported from ‘Prelude’ at Main.hs:1:1
              (and originally defined in ‘Data.Foldable’)
           or ‘Main.product’, defined at Main.hs:2:1
  |
3 | product n = n * product (n-1)
  |                 ^^^^^^^

Main.hs:5:15: error:
    Ambiguous occurrence ‘product’
    It could refer to
       either ‘Prelude.product’,
              imported from ‘Prelude’ at Main.hs:1:1
              (and originally defined in ‘Data.Foldable’)
           or ‘Main.product’, defined at Main.hs:2:1
  |
5 | main = print (product(8))
  |               ^^^^^^^
Failed, no modules loaded.
 
<interactive>:1:1: error:
    • Variable not in scope: main
    • Perhaps you meant ‘min’ (imported from Prelude)
 ^
1
  • 1
    You have two functions named product, one defined in Prelude (an implicitly imported module) and one defined in the Main module defined by your code. The compiler doesn't know which one a bare word product is supposed to refer to.
    – chepner
    Sep 20 at 14:33

1 Answer 1

10

There's a function called product in the Prelude which is imported by default. So you have two functions named product: The one you wrote and the one built-in to Haskell.

You can always change your function's name. The function you've written there is typically called the factorial, so you could change the name to that.

You can also refer to your function by its fully qualified name.

main = print (Main.product 8)

(Note that modules not given an explicit name in Haskell are assumed to be named Main, so it's as though your file started with module Main where)

Alternatively, you can explicitly import the Prelude and hide what you don't want.

import Prelude hiding (product)
3
  • Cool, I didn't realize hiding worked if the module had already been imported. I didn't answer because I didn't want to get into how to disable the implicit Prelude import.
    – chepner
    Sep 20 at 17:11
  • 2
    @chepner It only works for Prelude. If your module contains an import for Prelude, then the implicit Prelude import that applies to all modules is disabled, and the one you wrote yourself is the only import for Prelude. Sep 20 at 17:24
  • OK, that makes more sense.
    – chepner
    Sep 20 at 17:30

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