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I have multiple forms in one project: frmBooking, frmWelcome, frmAdmin. I want to reset frmBooking (i.e., reset it to its initial state, as if it's just created with all the components) by clicking a button. I tried doing the following:

frmBooking.Destroy;
Application.CreateForm(TForm, frmBooking);
frmBooking.Show;

The result, however, is that it just creates a blank form, not resetting the form to its initial state.

What can I do to reset the form?

7
  • 5
    You should use the actual form class instead of TForm.
    – Uwe Raabe
    Sep 22 at 15:13
  • 1
    Really not much point in using Application.CreateForm. Had you used the standard construction pattern then the compiler would have told you the mistake. Sep 22 at 15:32
  • 1
    Note that it is not safe to destroy a Form object from inside one of its own event handlers (ie, a child button's OnClick event). So, you would have to delay such logic until after the event handler exits, such as by using TThread.ForceQueue(), PostMessage(), TTimer, etc. A better design would be to not destroy the Form at all, but simply expose a method to reset its internal state as needed (reset UI controls, set data members to default values, etc). Sep 22 at 15:43
  • It's its, not it's.
    – AmigoJack
    Sep 22 at 16:18
  • @RemyLebeau, for destroying a form inside its own event handler a method called Release was invented: docwiki.embarcadero.com/Libraries/Alexandria/en/…
    – Uwe Raabe
    Sep 22 at 17:22

2 Answers 2

1

Based on your initial approach I put together some code.

var
  theOwner: TComponent;
begin
  { make sure that we don't kill ourselves. 
    can be omitted if we are sure it cannot happen. }
  theOwner := Owner;
  while theOwner <> nil do begin
    if theOwner = frmBooking then
      raise Exception.Create('cannot recreate owner form');
    theOwner := theOwner.Owner;
  end;
  
  { find out who must be the owner of the newly created instance }
  theOwner := frmBooking.Owner;
  frmBooking.Free;
  frmBooking := TfrmBooking.Create(theOwner);
  frmBooking.Show;
end;
-2

To refresh a form that was created by another form, you need to do a couple things.

First, know who owns what. Does the Form1 own Form2 or is Form1 just creating it for Application? If it is embedded in Form1, like a Form1.Panel1 or something, then Self or the Panel can be parent, but if we want it to show as a separate window, then Self is not correct, we likely need Application as our parent which you see in my TForm2.Create(Application)

Second, you need to handle a refresh request from the Form2 or some other service controlling the decision to refresh. For this, the easiest way is to use an EVENT that sends a message to Form1, or if something else makes that decision, the event procedure is handled similarly from that object to the the Form2, which begind the Close and then Form2 triggers a second Event like my example to whomever made Form2 in the first place like Form1! You COULD use sendmessage or postmessage, but that's beyond what is necessary. Forms have built in ones, but let's just make a new TNotifyEvent to show how it is done. An example of multiple Events is: imagine a MainForm having two tab controls, RTab and LTab each filled with 5 Tabs, each Tab is a Form in the source code. RTab2 is edited, it notifies Main with an Event, Main then notifies LTab2 to just reload data and display it in a Grid.

Lastly, the trigger for refresh can be anything and anywhere in Form2. In my example we force it with a button click that's no different than the X button except we followup with the execution of Form1's event handler. That will tell Form1 to begin recreating a new object while the old is destroying itself. Whether you create a new dataobject in your even handler, calling additional Form1 functions and procedures to do that, or just have Form2's Create repopulate is up to you.

If that isn't the case, my example shows on initial create of Form2 how to handle it.

There are no special Destroy's or FreeAndNil's necessary in my example, but you likely will need the override and reintroduced procedures.

All I have are two forms with buttons, so other than setting your button's OnClick, there is nothing special there. It is a very good idea to wrap your event call in a check to see if it is defined to prevent errors, even if it isn't optional...

if Assigned(EventProcedureName) then
begin
  EventProcedureName(Self);
end;

TForm1:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages, System.SysUtils, System.Variants,
  System.Classes, Vcl.Graphics, Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, Vcl.Dialogs,
  Vcl.StdCtrls;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    Button1: TButton;
    procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
    FCounter: Integer;
  public
    procedure RefreshChildEventHandler(Sender: TObject);
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

uses
  System.UITypes, Unit2;

{$R *.dfm}


procedure TForm1.RefreshChildEventHandler(Sender: TObject);
var
  childForm: TForm2;
  frmType: string;
begin
  try
    childForm := TForm2.Create(Application);
    case FCounter of
      0:
        begin
          childForm.Color := TColorRec.White;
          FCounter := 1;
        end;
      1:
        begin
          childForm.Color := TColorRec.Blue;
          FCounter := 2;
        end;
      2:
        begin
          childForm.Color := TColorRec.Red;
          FCounter := 0;
        end;

    end;

    childForm.RefreshMeEvent := RefreshChildEventHandler;
    childForm.Show;
  except
    raise;
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  // Why not use our procedure on initial create?
  RefreshChildEventHandler(Self);
end;

end.

TForm2:

unit Unit2;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages, System.SysUtils, System.Variants,
  System.Classes, Vcl.Graphics, Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, Vcl.Dialogs,
  Vcl.StdCtrls;

type
  TForm2 = class(TForm)
    Button1: TButton;
    procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
  private
    FOnChange: TNotifyEvent;
    { Private declarations }
  public
    { Public declarations }
    property RefreshMeEvent: TNotifyEvent
      read FOnChange
      write FOnChange;
  end;

var
  Form2: TForm2;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}


procedure TForm2.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Self.Close;
  Self.RefreshMeEvent(Self);
end;

end.
13
  • 1
    And what happens if the TForm2 constructor raises an exception? (Please note that the FreeAndNil has no benefit over a plain Free because the ident goes out of scope on the next line. But you do have a very nasty memory bug because of the misplaced ctor.) Sep 22 at 19:55
  • 1
    Also, the case is very verbose. Why not use a const array of colours and a simple c := Succ(c) mod N;? Sep 22 at 19:57
  • 1
    Well, when I made that comment, your code looked essentially like this: procedure P; var X: TForm2; begin try X := TForm2.Create(Application); except FreeAndNil(X); raise; end;. Now, if the TForm2.Create ctor raises an exception, the TForm2 dtor is run and the partially allocated obj's memory is relased. Due to the exception, the next line of code that will run is the code in your except block, which do FreeAndNil(X). This is essentially equivalent to X.Free; X := nil. Now, X is a local variable of a non-managed type, so it is initially not initialized. It can be ... Sep 22 at 21:02
  • 1
    ... anything, whatever happens to be in your computer's RAM at that time. Of course, this may vary between the invocations. So you do X.Free on a random pointer, i.e. running your TForm2 dtor with a pointer supposed to point to a TForm2 object, but now being a random pointer to somewhere in your process' memory! Then anything can happen. Hopefully you get an AV, but you might equally well change some random data in some completely unrelated place in your app, causing very strange bugs hours later! Sep 22 at 21:04
  • 2
    So this is why you should always do F := TFrog.Create; try { use F } finally F.Free; end and NOT try F := TFrog.Create; { use F } finally F.Free; end if F is a local variable. This is a very common mistake, unfortunately. Sep 22 at 21:14

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