187

I have a column that has values formatted like a,b,c,d. Is there a way to count the number of commas in that value in T-SQL?

1

25 Answers 25

288

The first way that comes to mind is to do it indirectly by replacing the comma with an empty string and comparing the lengths

Declare @string varchar(1000)
Set @string = 'a,b,c,d'
select len(@string) - len(replace(@string, ',', ''))
7
  • 18
    That answers the question as written in the text, but not as written in the title. To make it work for more than one character, just need to add a / len(searchterm) round the thing. Posted an answer in-case it's useful for someone. Commented May 25, 2010 at 15:55
  • 1
    Someone pointed out to me that this doesn't always work as expected. Consider the following: SELECT LEN('a,b,c,d ,') - LEN(REPLACE('a,b,c,d ,', ',', '')) For reasons I don't yet understand, the space between the d and the final column causes this to return 5 instead of 4. I will post another answer which fixes this, in case it is useful to anyone.
    – bubbleking
    Commented Apr 30, 2015 at 15:54
  • 5
    Maybe using DATALENGTH instead LEN would be better, because LEN returns the size of the string trimmed.
    – rodrigocl
    Commented Nov 3, 2015 at 17:26
  • 2
    DATALENGTH()/2 is also tricky because of non-obvious char sizes. Look at stackoverflow.com/a/11080074/1094048 for simple and accurate way to get string length.
    – pkuderov
    Commented Jul 13, 2016 at 13:51
  • 1
    @ImranRizvi has a great answer for counting strings of any size. It can even be enhanced further to also allow you to count spaces or substrings with leading/trailing spaces by replacing LEN with DATALENGTH like this: (DATALENGTH(@string) - DATALENGTH(REPLACE(@string, @substring, '')))/DATALENGTH(@substring)
    – rbsdca
    Commented Feb 22, 2018 at 7:37
91

Quick extension of cmsjr's answer that works for strings with more than one character.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.CountOccurrencesOfString
(
    @searchString nvarchar(max),
    @searchTerm nvarchar(max)
)
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
    return (LEN(@searchString)-LEN(REPLACE(@searchString,@searchTerm,'')))/LEN(@searchTerm)
END

Usage:

SELECT * FROM MyTable
where dbo.CountOccurrencesOfString(MyColumn, 'MyString') = 1
4
  • 24
    A slight improvement would be to use DATALENGTH()/2 instead of LEN(). LEN will ignore any trailing whitespace so dbo.CountOccurancesOfString( 'blah ,', ',') will return 2 instead of 1 and dbo.CountOccurancesOfString( 'hello world', ' ') will fail with divide by zero.
    – Rory
    Commented Jun 29, 2012 at 10:25
  • 7
    Rory's comment is helpful. I found that I could just replace LEN with DATALENGTH in Andrew's function and get the desired result. It seems that dividing by 2 is not necessary with the way the math works out. Commented Mar 28, 2013 at 15:11
  • @AndrewBarrett : What append when several strings have the same length? Commented May 12, 2014 at 15:57
  • 2
    DATALENGTH()/2 is also tricky because of non-obvious char sizes. Look at stackoverflow.com/a/11080074/1094048 for simple and accurate way.
    – pkuderov
    Commented Jul 13, 2016 at 13:49
42

You can compare the length of the string with one where the commas are removed:

len(value) - len(replace(value,',',''))
11

The answer by @csmjr has a problem in some instances.

His answer was to do this:

Declare @string varchar(1000)
Set @string = 'a,b,c,d'
select len(@string) - len(replace(@string, ',', ''))

This works in most scenarios, however, try running this:

DECLARE @string VARCHAR(1000)
SET @string = 'a,b,c,d ,'
SELECT LEN(@string) - LEN(REPLACE(@string, ',', ''))

For some reason, REPLACE gets rid of the final comma but ALSO the space just before it (not sure why). This results in a returned value of 5 when you'd expect 4. Here is another way to do this which will work even in this special scenario:

DECLARE @string VARCHAR(1000)
SET @string = 'a,b,c,d ,'
SELECT LEN(REPLACE(@string, ',', '**')) - LEN(@string)

Note that you don't need to use asterisks. Any two-character replacement will do. The idea is that you lengthen the string by one character for each instance of the character you're counting, then subtract the length of the original. It's basically the opposite method of the original answer which doesn't come with the strange trimming side-effect.

1
  • 6
    "For some reason, REPLACE gets rid of the final comma but ALSO the space just before it (not sure why)." REPLACE ain't getting rid of the last comma and the space before it, it's actually the LEN function that's ignoring the white-space resulting at the end of the string because of that space. Commented May 21, 2015 at 11:56
10

Building on @Andrew's solution, you'll get much better performance using a non-procedural table-valued-function and CROSS APPLY:

SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
/*  Usage:
    SELECT t.[YourColumn], c.StringCount
    FROM YourDatabase.dbo.YourTable t
        CROSS APPLY dbo.CountOccurrencesOfString('your search string',     t.[YourColumn]) c
*/
CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[CountOccurrencesOfString]
(
    @searchTerm nvarchar(max),
    @searchString nvarchar(max)

)
RETURNS TABLE
AS
    RETURN 
    SELECT (DATALENGTH(@searchString)-DATALENGTH(REPLACE(@searchString,@searchTerm,'')))/NULLIF(DATALENGTH(@searchTerm), 0) AS StringCount
1
  • I use this same function in many of my legacy databases, it helps a great deal with a lot of old and improperly designed databases. Saves a great deal of time and is very fast even on large data sets.
    – Caimen
    Commented Oct 28, 2016 at 17:02
2

Accepted answer is correct , extending it to use 2 or more character in substring:

Declare @string varchar(1000)
Set @string = 'aa,bb,cc,dd'
Set @substring = 'aa'
select (len(@string) - len(replace(@string, @substring, '')))/len(@substring)
1
  • That extension was posted seven years prior.
    – GSerg
    Commented Apr 10 at 12:44
1
Declare @string varchar(1000)

DECLARE @SearchString varchar(100)

Set @string = 'as as df df as as as'

SET @SearchString = 'as'

select ((len(@string) - len(replace(@string, @SearchString, ''))) -(len(@string) - 
        len(replace(@string, @SearchString, ''))) % 2)  / len(@SearchString)
1
  • this actually returns 1 less the actual count Commented Oct 4, 2018 at 19:10
1

Darrel Lee I think has a pretty good answer. Replace CHARINDEX() with PATINDEX(), and you can do some weak regex searching along a string, too...

Like, say you use this for @pattern:

set @pattern='%[-.|!,'+char(9)+']%'

Why would you maybe want to do something crazy like this?

Say you're loading delimited text strings into a staging table, where the field holding the data is something like a varchar(8000) or nvarchar(max)...

Sometimes it's easier/faster to do ELT (Extract-Load-Transform) with data rather than ETL (Extract-Transform-Load), and one way to do this is to load the delimited records as-is into a staging table, especially if you may want an simpler way to see the exceptional records rather than deal with them as part of an SSIS package...but that's a holy war for a different thread.

1

If we know there is a limitation on LEN and space, why cant we replace the space first? Then we know there is no space to confuse LEN.

len(replace(@string, ' ', '-')) - len(replace(replace(@string, ' ', '-'), ',', ''))
1

Use this code, it is working perfectly. I have create a sql function that accept two parameters, the first param is the long string that we want to search into it,and it can accept string length up to 1500 character(of course you can extend it or even change it to text datatype). And the second parameter is the substring that we want to calculate the number of its occurance(its length is up to 200 character, of course you can change it to what your need). and the output is an integer, represent the number of frequency.....enjoy it.


CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[GetSubstringCount]
(
  @InputString nvarchar(1500),
  @SubString NVARCHAR(200)
)
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN 
        declare @K int , @StrLen int , @Count int , @SubStrLen int 
        set @SubStrLen = (select len(@SubString))
        set @Count = 0
        Set @k = 1
        set @StrLen =(select len(@InputString))
    While @K <= @StrLen
        Begin
            if ((select substring(@InputString, @K, @SubStrLen)) = @SubString)
                begin
                    if ((select CHARINDEX(@SubString ,@InputString)) > 0)
                        begin
                        set @Count = @Count +1
                        end
                end
                                Set @K=@k+1
        end
        return @Count
end
1

In SQL 2017 or higher, you can use this:

declare @hits int = 0
set @hits = (select value from STRING_SPLIT('F609,4DFA,8499',','));
select count(@hits)
1

Improved version based on top answer and other answers:

Wrapping the string with delimiters ensures that LEN works properly. Making the replace character string one character longer than the match string removes the need for division.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.MatchCount(@value nvarchar(max), @match  nvarchar(max))
RETURNS int
BEGIN
    RETURN LEN('[' + REPLACE(@value,@match,REPLICATE('*', LEN('[' + @match + ']') - 1)) + ']') - LEN('['+@value+']')
END
0
DECLARE @records varchar(400)
SELECT @records = 'a,b,c,d'
select  LEN(@records) as 'Before removing Commas' , LEN(@records) - LEN(REPLACE(@records, ',', '')) 'After Removing Commans'
0

The following should do the trick for both single character and multiple character searches:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.CountOccurrences
(
   @SearchString VARCHAR(1000),
   @SearchFor    VARCHAR(1000)
)
RETURNS TABLE
AS
   RETURN (
             SELECT COUNT(*) AS Occurrences
             FROM   (
                       SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY O.object_id) AS n
                       FROM   sys.objects AS O
                    ) AS N
                    JOIN (
                            VALUES (@SearchString)
                         ) AS S (SearchString)
                         ON
                         SUBSTRING(S.SearchString, N.n, LEN(@SearchFor)) = @SearchFor
          );
GO

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- Test the function for single and multiple character searches
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DECLARE @SearchForComma      VARCHAR(10) = ',',
        @SearchForCharacters VARCHAR(10) = 'de';

DECLARE @TestTable TABLE
(
   TestData VARCHAR(30) NOT NULL
);

INSERT INTO @TestTable
     (
        TestData
     )
VALUES
     ('a,b,c,de,de ,d e'),
     ('abc,de,hijk,,'),
     (',,a,b,cde,,');

SELECT TT.TestData,
       CO.Occurrences AS CommaOccurrences,
       CO2.Occurrences AS CharacterOccurrences
FROM   @TestTable AS TT
       OUTER APPLY dbo.CountOccurrences(TT.TestData, @SearchForComma) AS CO
       OUTER APPLY dbo.CountOccurrences(TT.TestData, @SearchForCharacters) AS CO2;

The function can be simplified a bit using a table of numbers (dbo.Nums):

   RETURN (
             SELECT COUNT(*) AS Occurrences
             FROM   dbo.Nums AS N
                    JOIN (
                            VALUES (@SearchString)
                         ) AS S (SearchString)
                         ON
                         SUBSTRING(S.SearchString, N.n, LEN(@SearchFor)) = @SearchFor
          );
0

I finally write this function that should cover all the possible situations, adding a char prefix and suffix to the input. this char is evaluated to be different to any of the char conteined in the search parameter, so it can't affect the result.

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[CountOccurrency]
(
@Input nvarchar(max),
@Search nvarchar(max)
)
RETURNS int AS
BEGIN
    declare @SearhLength as int = len('-' + @Search + '-') -2;
    declare @conteinerIndex as int = 255;
    declare @conteiner as char(1) = char(@conteinerIndex);
    WHILE ((CHARINDEX(@conteiner, @Search)>0) and (@conteinerIndex>0))
    BEGIN
        set @conteinerIndex = @conteinerIndex-1;
        set @conteiner = char(@conteinerIndex);
    END;
    set @Input = @conteiner + @Input + @conteiner
    RETURN (len(@Input) - len(replace(@Input, @Search, ''))) / @SearhLength
END 

usage

select dbo.CountOccurrency('a,b,c,d ,', ',')
0

this T-SQL code finds and prints all occurrences of pattern @p in sentence @s. you can do any processing on the sentence afterward.

declare @old_hit int = 0
declare @hit int = 0
declare @i int = 0
declare @s varchar(max)='alibcalirezaalivisualization'
declare @p varchar(max)='ali'
 while @i<len(@s)
  begin
   set @hit=charindex(@p,@s,@i)
   if @hit>@old_hit 
    begin
    set @old_hit =@hit
    set @i=@hit+1
    print @hit
   end
  else
    break
 end

the result is: 1 6 13 20

0

I ended up using a CTE table for this,

CREATE TABLE #test (
 [id] int,
 [field] nvarchar(500)
)

INSERT INTO #test ([id], [field])
VALUES (1, 'this is a test string http://url, and https://google.com'),
       (2, 'another string, hello world http://example.com'),
       (3, 'a string with no url')

SELECT *
FROM #test

;WITH URL_count_cte ([id], [url_index], [field])
AS
(
    SELECT [id], CHARINDEX('http', [field], 0)+1 AS [url_index], [field]
    FROM #test AS [t]
    WHERE CHARINDEX('http', [field], 0) != 0
    UNION ALL
    SELECT [id], CHARINDEX('http', [field], [url_index])+1 AS [url_index], [field]
    FROM URL_count_cte
    WHERE CHARINDEX('http', [field], [url_index]) > 0
)

-- total urls
SELECT COUNT(1)
FROM URL_count_cte

-- urls per row
SELECT [id], COUNT(1) AS [url_count]
FROM URL_count_cte
GROUP BY [id]
0

Using this function, you can get the number of repetitions of words in a text.

/****** Object:  UserDefinedFunction [dbo].[fn_getCountKeywords]    Script Date: 22/11/2021 17:52:00 ******/
DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS [dbo].[fn_getCountKeywords]
GO
/****** Object:  UserDefinedFunction [dbo].[fn_getCountKeywords]    Script Date: 2211/2021 17:52:00 ******/
SET ANSI_NULLS OFF
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
-- =============================================
-- Author:      m_Khezrian
-- Create date: 2021/11/22-17:52
-- Description: Return Count Keywords In Input Text
-- =============================================

Create OR Alter Function [dbo].[fn_getCountKeywords]
    (@Text      nvarchar(max)
    ,@Keywords  nvarchar(max)
    )
RETURNS @Result TABLE
(    
   [ID]         int Not Null IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY
  ,[Keyword]    nvarchar(max) Not Null
  ,[Cnt]        int Not Null Default(0)

)
/*With ENCRYPTION*/ As 
Begin
    Declare @Key    nvarchar(max);
    Declare @Cnt    int;
    Declare @I      int;

    Set @I = 0 ;
    --Set @Text = QUOTENAME(@Text);

    Insert Into @Result
        ([Keyword])
    Select Trim([value])
    From String_Split(@Keywords,N',')
    Group By [value]
    Order By Len([value]) Desc;

    Declare CntKey_Cursor Insensitive Cursor For
    Select [Keyword]
    From @Result
    Order By [ID];

    Open CntKey_Cursor;
    Fetch Next From CntKey_Cursor Into @Key;
    While (@@Fetch_STATUS = 0) Begin
        Set @Cnt = 0;

        While (PatIndex(N'%'+@Key+'%',@Text) > 0) Begin
            Set @Cnt += 1;
            Set @I += 1 ;
            Set @Text = Stuff(@Text,PatIndex(N'%'+@Key+'%',@Text),len(@Key),N'{'+Convert(nvarchar,@I)+'}');
            --Set @Text = Replace(@Text,@Key,N'{'+Convert(nvarchar,@I)+'}');
        End--While

        Update @Result
            Set [Cnt] = @Cnt
        Where ([Keyword] = @Key);

        Fetch Next From CntKey_Cursor Into @Key;
    End--While
    Close CntKey_Cursor;
    Deallocate CntKey_Cursor;
    Return
 End
GO

--Test
Select *
From dbo.fn_getCountKeywords(
        N'<U+0001F4E3> MARKET IMPACT Euro area Euro CPIarea annual inflation up to 3.0% MaCPIRKET forex'
        ,N'CPI ,core,MaRKET , Euro area'
        )       

Go
0

Reference https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/functions/string-split-transact-sql?view=sql-server-ver15

Example:

SELECT  s.*
    ,s.[Number1] - (SELECT COUNT(Value)
                        FROM string_split(s.[StringColumn],',')
                        WHERE RTRIM(VALUE) <> '')
FROM TableName AS s

Applies to: SQL Server 2016 (13.x) and later

1
  • I don't know what s.[Number1] is, but if you subtract 1 from the remainder of your query you get the correct answer Commented Jul 16, 2023 at 13:20
0
DECLARE @INPUT VARCHAR(70)='Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.'

SELECT COUNT(*)-1 AS COUNT_OF_SPACES FROM 
(SELECT value FROM STRING_SPLIT(@INPUT ,' ')) T
-1

You can use the following stored procedure to fetch , values.

IF  EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.objects 
WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo].[sp_parsedata]') AND type in (N'P', N'PC'))
    DROP PROCEDURE [dbo].[sp_parsedata]
GO
create procedure sp_parsedata
(@cid integer,@st varchar(1000))
as
  declare @coid integer
  declare @c integer
  declare @c1 integer
  select @c1=len(@st) - len(replace(@st, ',', ''))
  set @c=0
  delete from table1 where complainid=@cid;
  while (@c<=@c1)
    begin
      if (@c<@c1) 
        begin
          select @coid=cast(replace(left(@st,CHARINDEX(',',@st,1)),',','') as integer)
          select @st=SUBSTRING(@st,CHARINDEX(',',@st,1)+1,LEN(@st))
        end
      else
        begin
          select @coid=cast(@st as integer)
        end
      insert into table1(complainid,courtid) values(@cid,@coid)
      set @c=@c+1
    end
1
  • line 4 of this stored procedure sets @c1 to the answer that he requires. What use is the rest of the code, considering that it needs a pre existing table called table1 to work, has a hard coded delimeter, and cannot be used inline like the accepted answer from two months prior?
    – Nick.Mc
    Commented Aug 14, 2014 at 2:57
-1

The Replace/Len test is cute, but probably very inefficient (especially in terms of memory). A simple function with a loop will do the job.

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[fn_Occurences] 
(
    @pattern varchar(255),
    @expression varchar(max)
)
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN

    DECLARE @Result int = 0;

    DECLARE @index BigInt = 0
    DECLARE @patLen int = len(@pattern)

    SET @index = CHARINDEX(@pattern, @expression, @index)
    While @index > 0
    BEGIN
        SET @Result = @Result + 1;
        SET @index = CHARINDEX(@pattern, @expression, @index + @patLen)
    END

    RETURN @Result

END
3
  • Across any table of appreciable size, using a procedural function is far more inefficient
    – Nick.Mc
    Commented Aug 14, 2014 at 2:58
  • Good point. Are the built Len call much faster then a use defined function?
    – Darrel Lee
    Commented Dec 19, 2014 at 23:11
  • At a large scale of records, yes. Though to be certain you'd have to test on a large recordset with large strings. Never write anything procedural in SQL if you can avoid it (i.e. loops)
    – Nick.Mc
    Commented Dec 20, 2014 at 5:06
-1
Declare @MainStr nvarchar(200)
Declare @SubStr nvarchar(10)
Set @MainStr = 'nikhildfdfdfuzxsznikhilweszxnikhil'
Set @SubStr = 'nikhil'
Select (Len(@MainStr) - Len(REPLACE(@MainStr,@SubStr,'')))/Len(@SubStr)
1
  • This is the same as this answer posted nine years prior.
    – GSerg
    Commented Apr 10 at 12:41
-1

with latest SQL

SELECT COUNT(PATINDEX('%substring%', your_column)) AS substring_count FROM your_table;

2
  • 1
    This didnt work for me. PATINDEX is 'the starting position of the first occurrence of a pattern in a specified expression'
    – kneidels
    Commented Feb 28 at 13:05
  • Neither does it require "the latest SQL". Syntax wise it would run on the oldest SQL Servers, but it does not count the occurrences of characters.
    – GSerg
    Commented Apr 10 at 12:39
-5

Perhaps you should not store data that way. It is a bad practice to ever store a comma delimited list in a field. IT is very inefficient for querying. This should be a related table.

7
  • +1 for thinking of that. It's what I usually start with when someone uses comma separated data in a field.
    – Guffa
    Commented Apr 10, 2009 at 20:03
  • 7
    Part of the purpose of this question was to take existing data like that and split it apart appropriately. Commented Jun 3, 2010 at 18:34
  • 8
    Some of us are given legacy databases where that was done and we can't do anything about it.
    – eddieroger
    Commented Mar 10, 2014 at 14:33
  • @Mulmoth, of course it is an answer. you fix the problem not the symptom. The problem is withthe database design.
    – HLGEM
    Commented May 8, 2014 at 13:45
  • 2
    @HLGEM The question may point to a problem, but it can be understood more general. The question is totally legitimate for very well normalized databases.
    – Zeemee
    Commented May 8, 2014 at 14:13

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