21

What does the return inside the if statements do in the following code?

public void startElement(String namespaceURI, String localName,String qName, 
                                         Attributes atts) throws SAXException
{
    depth++;
    if (localName.equals("channel"))
    {
        currentstate = 0;
        return;
    }
    if (localName.equals("image"))
    {
        // record our feed data - you temporarily stored it in the item :)
        _feed.setTitle(_item.getTitle());
        _feed.setPubDate(_item.getPubDate());
    }
    if (localName.equals("item"))
    {
        // create a new item
        _item = new RSSItem();
        return;
    }
    if (localName.equals("title"))
    {
        currentstate = RSS_TITLE;
        return;
    }
    if (localName.equals("description"))
    {
        currentstate = RSS_DESCRIPTION;
        return;
    }
    if (localName.equals("link"))
    {
        currentstate = RSS_LINK;
        return;
    }
    if (localName.equals("category"))
    {
        currentstate = RSS_CATEGORY;
        return;
    }
    if (localName.equals("pubDate"))
    {
        currentstate = RSS_PUBDATE;
        return;
    }
    // if you don't explicitly handle the element, make sure you don't wind 
           // up erroneously storing a newline or other bogus data into one of our 
           // existing elements
    currentstate = 0;
}

Does it takes us out of the if statement and proceeds to next statement or it takes us out of the method startElement?

1
  • 2
    Seems like all the answers here were posted at the same time and same content! – medopal Sep 12 '11 at 11:30
19

The returns in the above code will take you out of the method.

1
  • 3
    I'd also note that it does this at the line where the return is executed. None of the code under the line is executed – bittersweetryan Sep 12 '11 at 11:00
14

It finishes the method so the code below it, is not executed.

11

Does it takes us out of the if statement and proceeds to next statement or it takes us out of the method startElement?

It takes you out of the method.. The return statement terminates the execution of a function

3

return always takes control out of calling method.

3

Yes. The return here will take the control out of method.

2

it will return what you declared in the method head (here void = nothing = it will just end the method)

0

The return here is probably used in order to "improve" the performance of the method, so that other comparisons are not executed, once the needed scenario is performed.

However, it's not good practice to have multiple return points in a method.

As stated in my comments I'd try a different approach to achieve the flow of the code in question.

4
  • 2
    -1 Who says it's not good practice to have multiple return points? It's fine (as long as there aren't too many) – Bohemian Sep 12 '11 at 11:19
  • 1
    There are many debates on the internet regarding multiple exit points in a function. However in my small experience I've had lots of problems debugging method with return statements scattered across it's flow. In this case, the return statements are 7 and define the flow of the method. – Romeo Sep 12 '11 at 11:42
  • Actually, you're right... there are too many returns. If you edit your answer, I'll remove my downvote (I can't remove it unless you edit your post - just add a full stop or something, any change will let me remove it, but I'm locked out until you do) – Bohemian Sep 12 '11 at 21:29
  • I would say big methods should rather not have multiple return points. It's safer with smaller methods since it's easier to apprehend in a quick look things that must be deinitialized before returning. – Francois Sep 13 '11 at 8:59
0

The return will end the flow of the method, and is functionally identical to using a shorter else if chain like

/* if (localName.equals("channel")) {
    currentstate = 0; // This can be removed because it's the default below.
} else */ if (localName.equals("image")) {
    // record our feed data - you temporarily stored it in the item :)
    _feed.setTitle(_item.getTitle());
    _feed.setPubDate(_item.getPubDate());
} else if (localName.equals("item")) {
    // create a new item
    _item = new RSSItem();
} else if (localName.equals("title")) {
    currentstate = RSS_TITLE;
} else if (localName.equals("description")) {
    currentstate = RSS_DESCRIPTION;
} else if (localName.equals("link")) {
    currentstate = RSS_LINK;
} else  if (localName.equals("category")) {
    currentstate = RSS_CATEGORY;
} else if (localName.equals("pubDate")) {
    currentstate = RSS_PUBDATE;
} else {
    currentstate = 0;
}

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