33

I have a json-object in C# (represented as a Newtonsoft.Json.Linq.JObject object) and I need to flatten it to a dictionary. Let me show you an example of what I mean:

{
    "name": "test",
    "father": {
         "name": "test2"
         "age": 13,
         "dog": {
             "color": "brown"
         }
    }
}

This should yield a dictionary with the following key-value-pairs:

["name"] == "test",
["father.name"] == "test2",
["father.age"] == 13,
["father.dog.color"] == "brown"

How can I do this?

4
  • you can view your input json a graph, then perform an exhaustive traversal of said graph, adding to a result set on each node visit Commented Sep 12, 2011 at 22:17
  • Could I get some code or links for the exhaustive traversal of said graph?
    – Alxandr
    Commented Sep 12, 2011 at 22:24
  • en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_traversal Commented Sep 12, 2011 at 22:33
  • fyi - i think you'll actually want to add to result set on the leaf nodes and append to your result key on the non-leaf... Commented Sep 12, 2011 at 22:38

6 Answers 6

42
JObject jsonObject=JObject.Parse(theJsonString);
IEnumerable<JToken> jTokens = jsonObject.Descendants().Where(p => !p.HasValues);
Dictionary<string, string> results = jTokens.Aggregate(new Dictionary<string, string>(), (properties, jToken) =>
                    {
                        properties.Add(jToken.Path, jToken.ToString());
                        return properties;
                    });

I had the same requirement of flattening a nested json structure to a dictionary object. Found the solution here.

3
  • 5
    I love you. U saved my life Commented Jul 27, 2016 at 4:02
  • 1
    Maybe performance can be improved a bit if one doesn't use Count(): i.e. ...Where(p => !p.HasValues).
    – Gebb
    Commented Aug 10, 2021 at 15:55
  • 1
    @Gebb Yea I'd use .Where(p => !p.Any()) Commented Oct 7, 2021 at 21:38
8

As of .NET Core 3.0 JsonDocument is a way (Json.NET is not needed). I'm sure this will get easier.

using System.Linq;
using System.Text.Json;
(...)


public static Dictionary<string, JsonElement> GetFlat(string json)
{
    IEnumerable<(string Path, JsonProperty P)> GetLeaves(string path, JsonProperty p)
        => p.Value.ValueKind != JsonValueKind.Object
            ? new[] { (Path: path == null ? p.Name : path + "." + p.Name, p) }
            : p.Value.EnumerateObject() .SelectMany(child => GetLeaves(path == null ? p.Name : path + "." + p.Name, child));

    using (JsonDocument document = JsonDocument.Parse(json)) // Optional JsonDocumentOptions options
        return document.RootElement.EnumerateObject()
            .SelectMany(p => GetLeaves(null, p))
            .ToDictionary(k => k.Path, v => v.P.Value.Clone()); //Clone so that we can use the values outside of using
}

A more expressive version is shown below.

Test

using System.Linq;
using System.Text.Json;
(...)

var json = @"{
    ""name"": ""test"",
    ""father"": {
            ""name"": ""test2"", 
         ""age"": 13,
         ""dog"": {
                ""color"": ""brown""
         }
        }
    }";

var d = GetFlat(json);
var options2 = new JsonSerializerOptions { WriteIndented = true };
Console.WriteLine(JsonSerializer.Serialize(d, options2));

Output

{
  "name": "test",
  "father.name": "test2",
  "father.age": 13,
  "father.dog.color": "brown"
}

More expressive version

using System.Linq;
using System.Text.Json;
(...)

static Dictionary<string, JsonElement> GetFlat(string json)
    {
        using (JsonDocument document = JsonDocument.Parse(json))
        {
            return document.RootElement.EnumerateObject()
                .SelectMany(p => GetLeaves(null, p))
                .ToDictionary(k => k.Path, v => v.P.Value.Clone()); //Clone so that we can use the values outside of using
        }
    }


    static IEnumerable<(string Path, JsonProperty P)> GetLeaves(string path, JsonProperty p)
    {
        path = (path == null) ? p.Name : path + "." + p.Name;
        if (p.Value.ValueKind != JsonValueKind.Object)
            yield return (Path: path, P: p);
        else
            foreach (JsonProperty child in p.Value.EnumerateObject())
                foreach (var leaf in GetLeaves(path, child))
                    yield return leaf;
    }

1
  • useful for converting json appSettings to AppService configuration (which uses double underscore rather than a dot)
    – MarkD
    Commented Dec 23, 2020 at 22:34
7

I actually had the same problem earlier today couldn't find this question on SO at first, and ended up writing my own extension method to return the JValue objects containing the leaf node values of the JSON blob. It's similar to the accepted answer, except for some improvements:

  1. It handles any JSON you give it (arrays, properties, etc) instead of just a JSON object.
  2. Less memory usage
  3. No calls to .Count() on descendants you ultimately don't need

Depending on your use case, those may or may not be relevant, but they are for my case. I wrote about learning to flatten the JSON.NET objects on my blog. Here is the extension method I wrote:

public static class JExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<JValue> GetLeafValues(this JToken jToken)
    {
        if (jToken is JValue jValue)
        {
            yield return jValue;
        }
        else if (jToken is JArray jArray)
        {
            foreach (var result in GetLeafValuesFromJArray(jArray))
            {
                yield return result;
            }
        }
        else if (jToken is JProperty jProperty)
        {
            foreach (var result in GetLeafValuesFromJProperty(jProperty))
            {
                yield return result;
            }
        }
        else if (jToken is JObject jObject)
        {
            foreach (var result in GetLeafValuesFromJObject(jObject))
            {
                yield return result;
            }
        }
    }

    #region Private helpers

    static IEnumerable<JValue> GetLeafValuesFromJArray(JArray jArray)
    {
        for (var i = 0; i < jArray.Count; i++)
        {
            foreach (var result in GetLeafValues(jArray[i]))
            {
                yield return result;
            }
        }
    }

    static IEnumerable<JValue> GetLeafValuesFromJProperty(JProperty jProperty)
    {
        foreach (var result in GetLeafValues(jProperty.Value))
        {
            yield return result;
        }
    }

    static IEnumerable<JValue> GetLeafValuesFromJObject(JObject jObject)
    {
        foreach (var jToken in jObject.Children())
        {
            foreach (var result in GetLeafValues(jToken))
            {
                yield return result;
            }
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

Then in my calling code, I just extract the Path and Value properties from the JValue objects returned:

var jToken = JToken.Parse("blah blah json here"); 
foreach (var jValue in jToken.GetLeafValues()) 
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0} = {1}", jValue.Path, jValue.Value);
}
1
  • Nicely done, in a elegant non messy way :)
    – Netferret
    Commented Dec 10, 2023 at 16:30
5

You can use https://github.com/jsonfx/jsonfx to deserialize json into a dynamic object. Then use the ExpandoObject to get what you want.

public Class1()
        {
            string json = @"{
                                ""name"": ""test"",
                                ""father"": {
                                     ""name"": ""test2"",
                                     ""age"": 13,
                                     ""dog"": {
                                         ""color"": ""brown""
                                     }
                                }
                            }";

            var reader = new JsonFx.Json.JsonReader();
            dynamic output = reader.Read(json);
            Dictionary<string, object> dict = new Dictionary<string, object>();

            GenerateDictionary((System.Dynamic.ExpandoObject) output, dict, "");
        }

        private void GenerateDictionary(System.Dynamic.ExpandoObject output, Dictionary<string, object> dict, string parent)
        {
            foreach (var v in output)
            {
                string key = parent + v.Key;
                object o = v.Value;

                if (o.GetType() == typeof(System.Dynamic.ExpandoObject))
                {
                    GenerateDictionary((System.Dynamic.ExpandoObject)o, dict, key + ".");
                }
                else
                {
                    if (!dict.ContainsKey(key))
                    {
                        dict.Add(key, o);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
3
  • Doesn't he want to do this with Newtonsoft's JSON serializer? Commented Sep 12, 2011 at 23:21
  • Yes, he could use reflection on the newtonsoft object, and traverse the properties there, however, he could easily get the JSON string, and plug it into this and get the result that he needs.
    – bencobb
    Commented Sep 12, 2011 at 23:30
  • Actually, you are both partly right. I'm using the Newtonsoft's JSON-serializer, but I have no need to use reflection. Though, I appriciate your GenerateDictionary-method, which I'll just rewrite to my objects.
    – Alxandr
    Commented Sep 12, 2011 at 23:33
2

You could use the JSONPath $..* to get all members of the JSON structure and filter out the ones with no children to skip the container properties.

e.g.

var schemaObject = JObject.Parse(schema);
var values = schemaObject
    .SelectTokens("$..*")
    .Where(t => !t.HasValues)
    .ToDictionary(t => t.Path, t => t.ToString());
1

Based on the code that was provided by tymtam, but also supporting arrays:

    public static IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, string>> Flatten<T>(this T data, string seperator = ":") where T : class
    {
        var json = JsonSerializer.Serialize(data);

        string GetArrayPath(string path, string name, int idx) =>
            path == null ? $"{name}{seperator}{idx}" : $"{path}{seperator}{name}{seperator}{idx}";
        IEnumerable<(string Path, JsonElement Element)> GetLeaves(string path, string name, JsonElement element) => element.ValueKind switch
        {
            JsonValueKind.Object => element.EnumerateObject()
                .SelectMany(child => GetLeaves(path == null ? name : $"{path}{seperator}{name}", child.Name, child.Value)),
            JsonValueKind.Array => element.EnumerateArray()
                .SelectMany((child, idx) => child.ValueKind == JsonValueKind.Object
                        ? child.EnumerateObject().SelectMany(child => GetLeaves(GetArrayPath(path, name, idx), child.Name, child.Value))
                        : new[] { (Path: GetArrayPath(path, name, idx), child) }
                    ),
            _ => new[] { (Path: path == null ? name : $"{path}{seperator}{name}", element) },
        };

        using JsonDocument document = JsonDocument.Parse(json); // Optional JsonDocumentOptions options
        return document.RootElement.EnumerateObject()
            .SelectMany(p => GetLeaves(null, p.Name, p.Value))
            .ToDictionary(k => k.Path, v => v.Element.Clone().ToString()); //Clone so that we can use the values outside of using
    }

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