48

I am wondering if there is a built-in function in R which applies a function to each element of the matrix (of course, the function should be computed based on matrix indices). The equivalent would be something like this:

matrix_apply <- function(m, f) {
  m2 <- m
  for (r in seq(nrow(m2)))
    for (c in seq(ncol(m2)))
      m2[[r, c]] <- f(r, c)
  return(m2)
}

If there is no such built-in function, what is the best way to initialize a matrix to contain values obtained by computing an arbitrary function which has matrix indices as parameters?

  • 3
    are you familiar with the aptly named apply() family of functions? The MARGIN parameter accepts values for rows, columns, and rows & columns. Not to mention that quite a few R functions are vectorized and can avoid this type of programming. – Chase Sep 13 '11 at 0:27
  • 3
    @leden can you give an example of f()? As far as I can tell, any vectorized function will work on a matrix as it is just a vector with a dim attribute. You don't need to break it down into row and columns indices. At the moment there is an amount of ambiguity in your Q; it seems like you want a general solution but proscribe that it should b based on indices, which is sub-optimal. – Reinstate Monica - G. Simpson Sep 13 '11 at 8:36
  • What I mean is, why can't f() be written such that all you really need is m[] <- f(m)? I'll add an example... – Reinstate Monica - G. Simpson Sep 13 '11 at 8:43
  • 1
    I think the OP needs to respond to all of us, and not just because it's polite :-) . Reading his example exactly as written, is m2 matrix is generated with a function 'f(r,c)' which is purely a function of the indices and has nothing to do with the contents of the original matrix. Since that's presumably not what he wanted, as opposed to 'g(r,c,m[r,c])' , or 'g(m[r,c])' , the answers provided so far are very good but not necessarily answering his (ambiguous) question. – Carl Witthoft Sep 13 '11 at 16:57
  • I just need to be able to apply a function which takes at least indices of each matrix columns. One such application, is let's say I want to create a multiplication table, or just evaluate some function of two parameters and store the results into the matrix. – eold Sep 13 '11 at 20:44
29

I suspect you want outer:

> mat <- matrix(NA, nrow=5, ncol=3)

> outer(1:nrow(mat), 1:ncol(mat) , FUN="*")
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    2    3
[2,]    2    4    6
[3,]    3    6    9
[4,]    4    8   12
[5,]    5   10   15

> outer(1:nrow(mat), 1:ncol(mat) , FUN=function(r,c) log(r+c) )
          [,1]     [,2]     [,3]
[1,] 0.6931472 1.098612 1.386294
[2,] 1.0986123 1.386294 1.609438
[3,] 1.3862944 1.609438 1.791759
[4,] 1.6094379 1.791759 1.945910
[5,] 1.7917595 1.945910 2.079442

That yields a nice compact output. but it's possible that mapply would be useful in other situations. It is helpful to think of mapply as just another way to do the same operation that others on this page are using Vectorize for. mapply is more general because of the inability Vectorize to use "primitive" functions.

data.frame(mrow=c(row(mat)),   # straightens out the arguments
           mcol=c(col(mat)), 
           m.f.res= mapply(function(r,c) log(r+c), row(mat), col(mat)  ) )
#   mrow mcol   m.f.res
1     1    1 0.6931472
2     2    1 1.0986123
3     3    1 1.3862944
4     4    1 1.6094379
5     5    1 1.7917595
6     1    2 1.0986123
7     2    2 1.3862944
8     3    2 1.6094379
9     4    2 1.7917595
10    5    2 1.9459101
11    1    3 1.3862944
12    2    3 1.6094379
13    3    3 1.7917595
14    4    3 1.9459101
15    5    3 2.0794415

You probably didn't really mean to supply to the function what the row() and col() functions would have returned: This produces an array of 15 (somewhat redundant) 3 x 5 matrices:

> outer(row(mat), col(mat) , FUN=function(r,c) log(r+c) )
18

The simplest approach is just to use an f() that can be applied directly to the elements of the matrix. For example, using the matrix m from @adamleerich's Answer

m <- matrix(c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8), nrow = 2)

There is no reason to use apply() in the case of the as.character() example. Instead we can operate on the elements of m as if it were a vector (it really is one) and replace in-place:

> m[] <- as.character(m)
> m
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,] "1"  "3"  "5"  "7" 
[2,] "2"  "4"  "6"  "8"

The first part of that block is the key here. m[] forces the elements of m to be replaced by the output from as.character(), rather than overwriting m with a vector of characters.

So that is the general solution to applying a function to each element of a matrix.

If one really needs to use an f() that works on row and column indices then I'd write a f() using row() and col():

> m <- matrix(c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8), nrow = 2)
> row(m)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    1    1    1
[2,]    2    2    2    2
> col(m)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    2    3    4
[2,]    1    2    3    4
> row(m) * col(m) ## `*`(row(m), col(m)) to see this is just f()
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    2    3    4
[2,]    2    4    6    8

or one that use outer() as other's have shown. If f() isn't vectorised, then I'd rethink my strategy as far as possible as there i) probably is a way to write a truly vectorised version, and ii) a function that isn't vectorised isn't going to scale very well.

13

You didn't tell us what kind of function you want to apply to each element, but I think that the only reason the examples in the other answers work is because the functions are already vectorized. If you really want to apply a function to each element, outer will not give you anything special that the function didn't already give you. You'll notice that the answers didn't even pass a matrix to outer!

How about following @Chase's comment and use apply.

For example, I have the matrix

m <- matrix(c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8), nrow = 2)

If I want to turn it into a character matrix, element by element (just as an example) I could do this

apply(m, c(1,2), as.character)

Of course, as.character is already vectorized, but my special function my.special.function isn't. It only takes one argument, an element. There is no straighforward way to get outer to work with it. But, this works

apply(m, c(1,2), my.special.function)
  • You can make outer work with a non-vectorized function, but only by faking the vectorisation in the same way you are faking it with apply(). – Reinstate Monica - G. Simpson Sep 13 '11 at 8:38
  • Furthermore, I show in my Answer how you can do the as.character() without resorting to apply(), and as such, we should probably be advocating the right way to do things rather than faking the desired result - your apply() is just hiding a longer single-loop where the OP had two loops nested. – Reinstate Monica - G. Simpson Sep 13 '11 at 9:16
8

You may be thinking of outer:

rows <- 1:10
cols <- 1:10

outer(rows,cols,"+")

      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10]
 [1,]    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9   10    11
 [2,]    3    4    5    6    7    8    9   10   11    12
 [3,]    4    5    6    7    8    9   10   11   12    13
 [4,]    5    6    7    8    9   10   11   12   13    14
 [5,]    6    7    8    9   10   11   12   13   14    15
 [6,]    7    8    9   10   11   12   13   14   15    16
 [7,]    8    9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16    17
 [8,]    9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17    18
 [9,]   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18    19
[10,]   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19    20

That's clearly a fairly trivial example function, but you can supply your own custom one as well. See ?outer.

Edit

Contrary to the comment below, you can also use outer with non-vectorized functions by....vectorizing them!

m <- matrix(1:16,4,4)

#A non-vectorized function 
myFun <- function(x,y,M){
     M[x,y] + (x*y)
}

#Oh noes! 
outer(1:4,1:4,myFun,m)
Error in dim(robj) <- c(dX, dY) : 
  dims [product 16] do not match the length of object [256]

#Oh ho! Vectorize()! 
myVecFun <- Vectorize(myFun,vectorize.args = c('x','y'))

#Voila! 
outer(1:4,1:4,myVecFun,m)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    2    7   12   17
[2,]    4   10   16   22
[3,]    6   13   20   27
[4,]    8   16   24   32
  • I don't think that outer is what he is looking for. Just because his example with the double for loop looks like a call to outer doesn't mean that outer will work. Can you give an example that uses a function that is not vectorized? – adamleerich Sep 13 '11 at 3:10
  • @adamleerich See my edit. Non-vectorized functions can be vectorized. – joran Sep 13 '11 at 3:40
0

This does not answer your question exactly, but I found it while trying to figure out a similar question so I'll show you something.

Say you have a function which you want to apply to each element of a matrix which requires just one part.

mydouble <- function(x) {
   return(x+x)
}

And say you have a matrix X,

> x=c(1,-2,-3,4)
> X=matrix(x,2,2)
> X
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    1   -3
[2,]   -2    4

then you do this:

res=mydouble(X)

Then it will do an element-wise double of each value.

However, if you do logic in the function like below you will get a warning that it is not parameterized and not behave as you expect.

myabs <- function(x) {
  if (x<0) {
      return (-x)
  } else {
      return (x)
  }
}

> myabs(X)
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    1   -3
[2,]   -2    4
Warning message:
In if (x < 0) { :
  the condition has length > 1 and only the first element will be used

But if you use the apply() function you can use it.

For example:

> apply(X,c(1,2),myabs)
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    1    3
[2,]    2    4

So that is great, right? Well, it breaks down if you have a function with two or more parms. Say for example you have this:

mymath <- function(x,y) {
    if(x<0) {
        return(-x*y)
    } else {
        return(x*y)
    }
}

In this case, you use the apply() function. However, it will lose the matrix but the results are calculated correctly. They can be reformed if you are so inclined.

> mapply(mymath,X,X)
[1]  1 -4 -9 16
> mapply(mymath,X,2)
[1] 2 4 6 8
> matrix(mapply(mymath,X,2),c(2,2))
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    2    6
[2,]    4    8

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