3

I am utilizing nullable reference types in the C# nullable context.

I am taking a List<string>, then transforming it to a new List<string?> with a Select like so. I then filter out the nulls with a Where, but the underlying type is still List<string?>.

strings = strings
    .Select(s => method.ThatReturnsNullableString(s))
    .Where(s => s is not null)
    .ToList();

When I try to use this as a List<string>, I get a CS8619 compiler warning. An easy solution is to use the ! null-forgiving operator and the warning goes away, but I try to use this as sparingly as possible.

Another solution is to use .Cast<string>, but I would assume this adds runtime overhead for no reason.

Have I not sufficiently proven to the compiler that the collection is of type string, or is there something I'm missing?

5
  • Please put in full types in the query and include the signature for method.ThatReturnsNullableString(s). Oct 5, 2022 at 6:17
  • And var strings = strings is invalid C# code. Please give us real code. Oct 5, 2022 at 6:18
  • 2
    And there is no overhead for .Cast<string>() as you must do it. Oct 5, 2022 at 6:21
  • Where doesn't change the type.
    – Jodrell
    Oct 5, 2022 at 6:44
  • @Enigmativity Apologies, as I was trying to create a minimal example separate from my actual code. I have modified my example to match @Muhammad Sulaiman's answer. As for full types, strings is a List<string?> and the example method would be something like string Method(string? s).
    – aes
    Oct 5, 2022 at 16:24

3 Answers 3

10

.Where(s => s is not null) will suppress the null-only items and will keep items of type string?, so the result will be of type List<string?>.

Use .OfType<string>(), it will skip null values and casts string? to string, It's the equivalent to .Where(s => s is not null).Cast<string>().

strings = strings
    .Select(s => method.ThatReturnsNullableString(s))
    .OfType<string>()
    .ToList(); // List<string>
5
  • Please test your code before posting. It's invalid C#. Oct 5, 2022 at 6:52
  • Generally, this is not what OfType is for. You are explicitely stating result type, if source sequence changes its type, the result does not. By this approach you can unintentionally filter out things that are not null. Oct 5, 2022 at 7:28
  • @MuhammadSulaiman - There's nothing like testing your code. There's still a syntax error. Oct 5, 2022 at 7:35
  • @MuhammadSulaiman - Also, since the question is about the final type of the newStrings variable, I'd also suggest not using var. Oct 5, 2022 at 7:35
  • @AntonínLejsek In this instance, my list consists only of strings, but I appreciate your comment. Would you recommend the null-forgiving ! over this, or do you have a different idea?
    – aes
    Oct 5, 2022 at 16:28
1

I think Jodrell had a good idea, it is a pattern worth making an extension. But I would use more simple API.

strings = strings
    .Select(s => methodThatReturnsNullableString(s))
    .SkipNulls()                
    .ToList();

the extension code:

public static IEnumerable<T> SkipNulls<T>(this IEnumerable<T?> source)
{
    foreach (var item in source)
    {                
        if (item is not null)
        {
            yield return item;
        }
    }
}
0

I feel a lightly cleaner version of the extension method approach is this:

public static IEnumerable<T> Denullify<T>(this IEnumerable<T?> source)
{
    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        if (item is T value)
        {
            yield return value;
        }
    }
}

This code:

Console.WriteLine(String.Join(", ", new string?[] { "A", null, "B", }));
Console.WriteLine(String.Join(", ", new string?[] { "A", null, "B", }.Denullify()));

...produces:

A, , B
A, B

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