0
public class Factor1(int FactorX, int FactorY) : IFactors;
public class Factor2(int FactorX, int FactorY, int FZ) : IFactors;

public interface IFactors
{
    int FactorX { get; set; }
    int FactorY { get; set; }
}

public class BusinessLayerClass1
{
    IFactors _factorObj;
    public BusinessLayerClass1(IFactors factorObj)
    {
        _factorObj = factorObj;
    }
    public void Call() =>
        new BusinessLayerClass2(_factorObj).ShowFactors();
}

public class BusinessLayerClass2
{
    IFactors _factorObj;
    public BusinessLayerClass2(IFactors factorObj)
    {
        _factorObj = factorObj;
    }

    public void ShowFactors()
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(String.Concat(_factorObj.FactorX.ToString(), " - " +
         _factorObj.FactorY.ToString()));
    }
}

Main program

using SimpleInjector;

class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();
        for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew((num) =>
            {
                int num_ = (int)num;
                var factorObj = new Factor1() { FactorX = num_, FactorY = num_ + 1 };
                var container = new Container();
                var lifestyle = Lifestyle.Transient;
                container.Register<BusinessLayerClass1>(lifestyle);
                container.Register<BusinessLayerClass2>(lifestyle);
                container.RegisterInstance<IFactors>(factorObj);
                container.Verify();
                var BL = container.GetInstance<BusinessLayerClass1>();
                BL.Call();
            }, i));
        }
        Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
    }
}
  • Here, i implement Dependency injection to BusinessLayer classes to process factors(show values in that example).
  • Factor1 objects must be created at the beginning asynchronously using Task factory.
  • This works but i wonder if this is the right way to implement DI(for this example)?
  • If yes then, is there a better/convenient way to do that.
  • If no then, how should i implement DI regarding to this example?
4
  • 1
    I'm a little confused why you are creating multiple tasks and setting up a new container in each. Once should be enough. But other than that, without knowing the requirements for your app this example is too hypothetical/unfocussed for you to likely get any useful feedback you can use going forward. What's the reason you're asking?
    – Xerillio
    Commented Oct 5, 2022 at 9:59
  • 2
    This doesn't work to begin with. Main fires off some tasks and exits before these have any chance of even starting to execute. It's unclear why tasks are used at all. A task is a promise that something will complete in the future, not a thread. As for DI, there should be only one container. Types should be registered at the start of the application, before the actual business code starts to run. Instead of calling that container to generate instances, with eg container.GetInstance<>, only the root class of the application should be created and executed. Commented Oct 5, 2022 at 10:11
  • If you want to see how DI works start with the ASP.NET Core templates. Commented Oct 5, 2022 at 10:12
  • Edit : i added line -> Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray()); Commented Oct 5, 2022 at 10:57

1 Answer 1

2
  • You are creating a new container instance inside a while loop. This is not advised because of the performance overhead this is giving in a real-life application (see the Simple Injector documentation for more info). Perhaps not so much an issue for a short-lived Console application, but certainly something to consider.
  • The reason you seem to be creating a many container instances is likely because the Factor classes consist of runtime data and you are injecting runtime data into your application components. This practice is discourages, as I explained here. The refernced article also explains what yo do instead, which is to "let runtime data flow through the method calls of constructed object graphs.".
  • In your case this either means
    1. Changing the BL.Call method to include that runtime data as input parameter, and later on call BL.Call(factorObj) or
    2. Defining an IFactorContext interface/class pair, register it as Scoped, and supply the runtime values to a resolved IFactorContext.

Concerning the second option, this might look like this:

// Definitions
public interface IFactorContext { IFactors Factors { get; } }
public class FactorContext : IFactorContext { public IFactors Factors { get; set; } }

// Register container once
var container = new Container();
container.Options.DefaultScopedLifestyle = new AsyncScopedLifestyle();
container.Register<BusinessLayerClass1>();
container.Register<BusinessLayerClass2>();
container.Register<FactorContext>(Lifestyle.Scoped);
container.Register<IFactorContext, FactorContext>(Lifestyle.Scoped);
container.Verify();

// Operate loop many times
tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew((num) =>
{
  using (AsyncScopedLifestyle.BeginScope(container))
  {
      int num_ = (int)num;
      var factorObj = new Factor1() { FactorX = num_, FactorY = num_ + 1 };
  
      // Always reuse the single container instance here.
      container.GetInstance<FactorContext>().Factor = factorObj;
  
      var BL = container.GetInstance<BusinessLayerClass1>();
      BL.Call();
  }
}, i));
2
  • 1
    Additional comment, typically, to prevent tight coupling, you don't want BusinessLayerClass1 to new up BusinessLayerClass2. Instead, you hide BusinessLayerClass2 behind an abstraction and inject that into the constructor of BusinessLayerClass1.
    – Steven
    Commented Oct 5, 2022 at 11:44
  • I did that. Thank you! Commented Oct 7, 2022 at 12:29

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