24

For a lark I have started learning Prolog via http://www.learnprolognow.org/. My excuse is that I have only just started.

I am unsure of how the following (simple?) exercise should be written to work as expected. http://cs.union.edu/~striegnk/learn-prolog-now/html/node13.html#sec.l1.exercises

I can see that Gnu Prolog 1.4 ( http://www.gprolog.org/ ) is not happy that the 2nd predicate for wizard\1 is not next to the first one. I can re-order the program to make it work but then I end up with code which to my novice Prolog eye is less understandable than the one presented below.

Am I missing something obvious?

wiz.pl

wizard(ron).
hasWand(harry).
quidditchPlayer(harry).

wizard(X) :- hasBroom(X),hasWand(X).
hasBroom(X) :- quidditchPlayer(X).

consult wiz.pl

| ?- [wiz].
compiling D:/wiz.pl for byte code...
D:/wiz.pl:5: warning: discontiguous predicate wizard/1 - clause ignored
D:/wiz.pl compiled, 5 lines read - 632 bytes written, 24 ms

2 Answers 2

29

Most Prologs want the clauses for any particular predicate to be listed together, unless you do some magic. I'm surprised Striegnitz and Bos ignore this. Change the program to

% all clauses for wizard/1
wizard(ron).
wizard(X) :- hasBroom(X),hasWand(X).

hasWand(harry).
quidditchPlayer(harry).
hasBroom(X) :- quidditchPlayer(X).

Note that I've kept the clauses for wizard/1 in the same order as in the original program. For simple knowledge bases such as this one, order doesn't matter much, but when implementing non-deterministic algorithms, clause order may determine the order in which solutions are generated.

4
  • 1
    ok thanks, I had naively assumed that facts would be kept together and then the derived rules. I'll bear your note about order in mind going forward. I'll mail the authors for comment too. Sep 13, 2011 at 11:31
  • 1
    @AdamStraughan Did they ever respond? Mar 20, 2013 at 17:19
  • @DanielLyons, I can't remember, a search of my emails found nothing. Sorry I couldn't help more. Mar 20, 2013 at 20:15
  • 1
    Thanks for checking anyway! Mar 20, 2013 at 20:20
7

There is an ISO Prolog discontiguous directive that you can use to relax this requirement for a specific predicate:

http://www.gprolog.org/manual/gprolog.html#htoc53

2
  • This was useful, but I was struggling to figure out HOW to use the directive. I'm using the same learning material as the OP, and I discovered how to use the directive in your source code to fix the issue. Simply use this:
    – C. Griffin
    Sep 4, 2015 at 16:18
  • 2
    Somehow I missed my window for editing -- just add this to the top of your knowledge base: :-discontiguous(wizard/1).
    – C. Griffin
    Sep 4, 2015 at 16:27

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