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Possible Duplicate:
C# @“” how do i insert a tab?

I'm trying to just use the tab on my keyboard but the compiler interprets the tabs as spaces. Using \t won't work either, it will interpret it as \t literally. Is it not possible or am I missing something?

string str = @"\thi";
MessageBox.Show(str); // Shows "\thi"
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  • Now you know the limit of @ :-) – xanatos Sep 13 '11 at 17:06
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    I cannot answer since this has been marked as a duplicate, but you could easily use an interpreted and verbatim string string str = $@"{"\t"}hi"; – Esteban Jun 25 '18 at 0:03
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in VS2010 - if you copy to clipboard from a richtext application, and that content has a tab in it, I believe it will paste into the VS2010 editor as such.

(i consider this on the side of buggy and wouldn't be surprised if the behavior changes in the future)

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  • It does answer my question though. – Ahmet Sep 13 '11 at 17:13
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    It might be woth noting that it's not the compiler that is inserting spaces, it's the default settings in the Visual Studio editor. This can be turned off under tools->options – Mark Peters Sep 13 '11 at 17:25
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Split your string and insert a \t where you want it?

var str = @"This is a" + "\t" + @"tab";
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  • I kinda knew I can do that. My question is whether is possible to write it in and @"..." string. – Ahmet Sep 13 '11 at 17:06
  • I was all excited that my list of XML lines can look nicely indented in my C# code but now they can't :( – Ahmet Sep 13 '11 at 17:08
  • doesn't that go against the definition of what @ is for? that said, in VS2010 - if you copy to clipboard from a richtext application, and that content has a tab in it, I believe it will paste into the VS2010 editor as such. – Aaron Anodide Sep 13 '11 at 17:08
  • @Gabriel: you should post that as an answer. That actually works!!! You can also copy and paste tabs from notepad. This way I can have my lines of text look nicely indented. – Ahmet Sep 13 '11 at 17:10
  • @Ahmet That's potentially asking for trouble when it comes to source control, other people's editors, preferences, etc. – Adam Lear Sep 13 '11 at 17:35
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The whole point of a verbatim string literal is that escaping is turned off such that backslashes can be read as they are written. If you want escaping, then use a regular string literal (without the at symbol).

You could, of course, put a literal tab character (by pressing the tab key) within the string.

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Another option is to specify the tab as a parameter in string.Format:

string.Format(@"XX{0}XX", "\t"); // yields "XX    XX"
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You are using a string literal.

Instead, just do this:

string str = "\thi";
MessageBox.Show(str);
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    You are using a string literal too. The difference is that you are not using a verbatim string literal. – Paul Ruane Sep 13 '11 at 20:04

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