21

I am currently building my first MVC 3 application, using EF Code First, SQL CE and Ninject. I have read a lot about using Repositories, Unit of Work and Service Layers. I think I have got the basics sorted out, and I have made my own implementation.

This is my current setup:

Entities

public class Entity
{
    public DateTime CreatedDate { get; set; }
    public Entity()
    {
        CreatedDate = DateTime.Now;
    }
}

public class Profile : Entity
{
    [Key]
    public Guid UserId { get; set; }
    public string ProfileName { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Photo> Photos { get; set; }

    public Profile()
    {
        Photos = new List<Photo>();
    }

public class Photo : Entity
{
    [Key]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public Guid FileName { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }

    public virtual Profile Profile { get; set; }
    public Photo()
    {
        FileName = Guid.NewGuid();
    }
}

SiteContext

public class SiteContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Profile> Profiles { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Photo> Photos { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<PluralizingTableNameConvention>();
    }
}

Interface: IServices

public interface IServices : IDisposable
{
    PhotoService PhotoService { get; }
    ProfileService ProfileService { get; }

    void Save();
}

Implementation: Services

public class Services : IServices, IDisposable
{
    private SiteContext _context = new SiteContext();

    private PhotoService _photoService;
    private ProfileService _profileService;

    public PhotoService PhotoService
    {
        get
        {
            if (_photoService == null)
                _photoService = new PhotoService(_context);

            return _photoService;
        }
    }

    public ProfileService ProfileService
    {
        get
        {
            if (_profileService == null)
                _profileService = new ProfileService(_context);

            return _profileService;
        }
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        _context.SaveChanges();
    }

    private bool disposed = false;

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!this.disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                _context.Dispose();
            }
        }
        this.disposed = true;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
}

Interface

public interface IPhotoService
{
    IQueryable<Photo> GetAll { get; }
    Photo GetById(int photoId);
    Guid AddPhoto(Guid profileId);
}

Implementation

public class PhotoService : IPhotoService
{
    private SiteContext _siteContext;

    public PhotoService(SiteContext siteContext)
    {
        _siteContext = siteContext;
    }

    public IQueryable<Photo> GetAll
    {
        get
        {
            return _siteContext.Photos;
        }
    }

    public Photo GetById(int photoId)
    {
        return _siteContext.Photos.FirstOrDefault(p => p.Id == photoId);
    }

    public Guid AddPhoto(Guid profileId)
    {
        Photo photo = new Photo();

        Profile profile = _siteContext.Profiles.FirstOrDefault(p => p.UserId == profileId);

        photo.Profile = profile;
        _siteContext.Photos.Add(photo);

        return photo.FileName;
    }
}

Global.asax

protected void Application_Start()
    {
        AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();

        RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
        RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);

        ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(new NinjectControllerFactory());

        Database.SetInitializer<SiteContext>(new SiteInitializer());
    }

NinjectControllerFactory

public class NinjectControllerFactory : DefaultControllerFactory
{
    private IKernel ninjectKernel;
    public NinjectControllerFactory()
    {
        ninjectKernel = new StandardKernel();
        AddBindings();
    }
    protected override IController GetControllerInstance(RequestContext requestContext, Type controllerType)
    {
        return controllerType == null
            ? null
        : (IController)ninjectKernel.Get(controllerType);
    }

    private void AddBindings()
    {
        ninjectKernel.Bind<IServices>().To<Services>();
    }
}

PhotoController

public class PhotoController : Controller
{
    private IServices _services;

    public PhotoController(IServices services)
    {
        _services = services;
    }

    public ActionResult Show(int photoId)
    {
        Photo photo = _services.PhotoService.GetById(photoId);

        if (photo != null)
        {
            string currentProfile = "Profile1";

            _services.PhotoService.AddHit(photo, currentProfile);

            _services.Save();

            return View(photo);
        }
        else
        {
            // Add error message to layout
            TempData["message"] = "Photo not found!";
            return RedirectToAction("List");
        }
    }

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        _services.Dispose();
        base.Dispose(disposing);
    }
}

I can build my solution and it seems to be working correctly.

My questions are:

  1. Are there any obvious flaws in my implementation that I am missing?
  2. Will I be able to use this with TDD? Usually I see mocking of repositories but I haven't used that in the above, will that cause issues?
  3. Am I using DI (Ninject) correctly and enough?

I am a hobby programmer, so any comments and/or suggestions to my code are welcome!

2
  • 1
    fyi i noticed on stackexhange there is codereview.stackexchange.com - maybe this would be good for there too? – Aaron Anodide Sep 13 '11 at 21:52
  • @Gabriel Thank you for the link, didn't know that site existed :) I will see what happens here before going further. – esba Sep 13 '11 at 21:57
9

You've got the general idea, but it takes a while to really get used to Dependency Injection. I see a number of possible improvements to be made:

  1. Your IServices interface seems unnecessary. I'd prefer to have the controller specify which services it needs (IPhotoService, etc.) via its constructor, rather than using the IServices interface like some kind of strongly-typed service locator.
  2. Did I see a DateTime.Now in there? How are you going to verify that the date gets set correctly in a unit test? What if you decide to support multiple time zones later? How about using an injected date service to produce that CreatedDate?
  3. There is a very good Ninject extension specifically for MVC. It takes care of plugging into the various points that MVC 3 supports for injection. It implements things like your NinjectControllerFactory. All you have to do is make your Global class extend a specific Ninject-based application.
  4. I'd suggest using NinjectModules for setting your bindings, rather than setting them in your ControllerFactory.
  5. Consider using Binding by Convention so that you don't have to explicitly bind each service to its implementation.

Update

The Ninject MVC Extension can be found here. See the README section for an example of how to extend the NinjectHttpApplication. This example uses Modules, which you can read more about here. (They're basically just a place to put your binding code so that you don't violate the Single Responsibility Principle.)

Regarding conventions-based bindings, the general idea is to have your binding code scan the appropriate assemblies and automatically bind things like IPhotoService to PhotoService based on the naming convention. There is another extension here to help with such things. With it, you can put code like this in your module:

Kernel.Scan(s =>
                {
                   s.From(assembly);
                   s.BindWithDefaultConventions();
                });

The above code will auto-bind every class in the given assembly to any interface it implements that follows the "Default" conventions (e.g. Bind<IPhotoService>().To<PhotoService>()).

Update 2

Regarding using the same DbContext for an entire request, you can do something like this (using the Ninject.Web.Common library, which is required by the MVC extension):

Bind<SiteContext>().ToSelf().InRequestScope();

Then any context-dependent services that Ninject creates will share the same instance across a request. Note that I have personally used shorter-lived contexts, so I don't know off the top of my head how you'd force the context to be disposed at the end of the request, but I'm sure it wouldn't be too difficult.

4
  • Thank you for your suggestions @StriplingWarrior 1. I see your point, I can do without it. 2. I will look into that. 3-5. Can you provide me with some links about how to implement what you are describing? – esba Sep 13 '11 at 22:16
  • How do I get rid of IServices and still use the same DbContext when I am using multiple services (IPhotoService and IProfileService) in the same controller? – esba Sep 13 '11 at 22:24
  • If there was a photo category entity, would you break out a separate service for it or would you bundle that in with the photoservice? – Dan dot net Mar 27 '12 at 17:12
  • @Dandotnet: It's likely that there would be controllers that need to consume information about photo categories but not photos, and vice versa. Likewise, the methods dealing with photo categories are likely to have different dependencies than the ones dealing with photos. It seems logical to separate these into two services. – StriplingWarrior Mar 27 '12 at 17:26
4

The IServices and Services types seem superfluous to me. If you drop them and change your controller's constructor to be

public PhotoController(IPhotoService photoService, IProfileService profileService)
{
  _photoService = photoService;
  _profileService = profileService;
}

it will be more apparent what it is actually depending on. Moreover, when you create a new controller, that only really needs IProfileService, you can just pass an IProfileService instead of a full IService, thus giving the new controller a lighter dependency.

1
  • +1 Plus it avoids the possibility to abuse the usage /coupling of the individual services wherever you have the IService interface. – Liviu Mandras Jun 28 '13 at 8:55
0

I could argue that your services look very much with a repository. Look closely to the interface:

IQueryable<Photo> GetAll { get; }
Photo GetById(int photoId);
Guid AddPhoto(Guid profileId);

Looks very much like a repository to me. Maybe because the example is rather simple but I see the point of having a service if you add use case logic on it. instead of these rather simpel CRUD operations.

And you could argue that EFs DbSet and DbContext are the repositories and unit of work of the app...and at this point we enter a new zone that is somewhat out of scope of the question.

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