6

I'm looking for a more elegant way to do this:

#Create Dataset
set.seed(1)
x <- runif(100)
y <- runif(100)
z <- y*x

#Assign colors, based on z vector    
Data <- data.frame(Order=1:length(z),z=z)
Data <- Data[order(Data$z),]
Data$col <- rainbow(length(z))
orderedcolors <- Data[order(Data$Order),'col']

#Plot x vs y, colored by z
plot(x,y,col=orderedcolors)

Basically, I want to assign a color to each point in the z vector, and I want those colors to vary on a rainbow scale from z's lowest values to it's highest values.

10

You haven't said how to handle ties, but would this work:

plot(x,y,col = rainbow(length(z))[rank(z)])

That seems to generate the same output for me, by basically putting the colors in the order of z using indexing and rank.

11

Your solution assigns colour to the rank of your data. If that's what you had in mind, then that's great.

However, if you really had in mind that the value of the data should determine the colour, then here is a solution:

First, your code:

#Create Dataset
set.seed(1)
x <- runif(100)
y <- runif(100)
z <- y*x

par(mfrow=c(1,2))
#Assign colors, based on z vector    
Data <- data.frame(Order=1:length(z),z=z)
Data <- Data[order(Data$z),]
Data$col <- rainbow(length(z))
orderedcolors <- Data[order(Data$Order),'col']
plot(x,y,col=orderedcolors, main="Yours")

Next, my code. I use the function colorRamp that creates function that linearly interpolates between colours given the input to the function. Since the input to colorRamp must be in the range [0; 1], I first define a little helper function range01 that scales data between 0 and 1. Finally, since colorRamp gives output in RGB values, I use apply and rgb to get these values back into colours that plot understands:

range01 <- function(x)(x-min(x))/diff(range(x))
rainbow(7)
cRamp <- function(x){
  cols <- colorRamp(rainbow(7))(range01(x))
  apply(cols, 1, function(xt)rgb(xt[1], xt[2], xt[3], maxColorValue=255))
}  

#Plot x vs y, colored by z
plot(x,y,col=cRamp(z), main="Mine")

The results. Notice the different distribution in colours near the axes.

enter image description here

6

You can just create the rainbow of colors and then index it creatively

orderedcolors2 <- rainbow(length(z))[order(order(z))]

which gives the same set of colors as your original code

> identical(orderedcolors2, orderedcolors)
[1] TRUE
2
  • 2
    You say order(order()), I say rank(). Tomato, tom-ah-to. – joran Sep 14 '11 at 17:51
  • When I saw your answer, I realized that rank() made more sense conceptually; I just didn't think of it! – Brian Diggs Sep 14 '11 at 17:55

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