My application is to be deployed on both tcServer and WebSphere 6.1. This application uses ehCache and so requires slf4j as a dependency. As a result I've added the slf4j-api.jar (1.6) jar to my war file bundle.

The application works fine in tcServer except for the following error:

SLF4J: Failed to load class "org.slf4j.impl.StaticLoggerBinder".
SLF4J: Defaulting to no-operation (NOP) logger implementation
SLF4J: See http://www.slf4j.org/codes.html#StaticLoggerBinder for further details.

However, when I deploy in WebSphere I get a java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: org.slf4j.impl.StaticLoggerBinder.

I've checked the classpaths of both application servers and there is no other slf4j jar.

Does anyone have any ideas what may be happening here?

23 Answers 23

up vote 372 down vote accepted

I had the same issue with WebSphere 6.1. As Ceki pointed out, there were tons of jars that WebSphere was using and one of them was pointing to an older version of slf4j.

The No-Op rollback happens only with slf4j -1.6+ so anything older than that will throw an exception and halts your deployment.

There is a documentation in SLf4J site which resolves this. I followed that and added slf4j-simple-1.6.1.jar to my application along with slf4j-api-1.6.1.jar which I already had.

This solved my issue. Hope it helps others who have this issue.

  • 2
    Yes, the error goes as also mentioned here - slf4j.org/manual.html But i get a new error now - Caused by: java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: org.apache.commons.logging.LogFactory – david blaine Apr 17 '13 at 7:10
  • 1
    "As Ceki pointed out, there were tons of jars that WebSphere was using and one of them was pointing to a older version of slf4j." - So much for Maven taking care of dependencies! What a joke. – AndroidDev Mar 21 '14 at 17:39
  • 88
    Hey you MAVEN users: mvnrepository.com/artifact/org.slf4j/slf4j-simple/1.6.2 – Sergio Jul 8 '14 at 16:55
  • 2
    I'm using 1.7 and has the same problem. I add slf4j-simple-1.7.jar and now the problem solved. – littletiger May 27 '15 at 22:02
  • @Sergio maven solution is not working on jenkins Linux box. But it does work on local machine , not sure what may be going wrong ? – vikramvi May 2 '16 at 15:49

This is for those who came here from google search.

If you use maven just add the following

   <dependency>
       <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
       <artifactId>slf4j-api</artifactId>
       <version>1.7.5</version>
   </dependency>
   <dependency>
       <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
       <artifactId>slf4j-log4j12</artifactId>
       <version>1.7.5</version>
   </dependency>

Or

   <dependency>
       <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
       <artifactId>slf4j-api</artifactId>
       <version>1.7.5</version>
   </dependency>
   <dependency>
       <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
       <artifactId>slf4j-simple</artifactId>
       <version>1.6.4</version>
   </dependency>
  • 1
    Is there a reason for slf4j-simple not to be the same version as slf4j-api? They would probably work well together, but I think it is safer and a better practice in general to have them use the same version. Also, if you need to enable console-only logging, for instance, when running unit tests, then slf4j-simple seems to be enough (it was for me though). – Ivaylo Slavov May 12 '14 at 10:03
  • 17
    AFAIK you should have just 1 impl of slf4j, i.e. either slf4j-log4j12 OR slf4j-simple, not both. – Ondra Žižka Aug 1 '14 at 1:48
  • @Igor KatKov this works only on local machine but getting same error on Jenkins not sure what is going wrong. can you please clarify – vikramvi May 2 '16 at 15:26
  • 1
    Second dependency set worked for me. Thanks – Lasitha Yapa Mar 6 at 7:37
  • slf4j-api requires configuration which is not available when you first run it (and haven't edited any configuration files). Using slf4j-simple will allow you to use basic Logger without configuring any files but WYSIWYG. You can then move back to slf4j-api once you have learned to configure the files and customize the Logger output how you like. (Still learning where there are and how to edit them myself) – Chrips Apr 2 at 5:01

You need to add following jar file in your classpath: slf4j-simple-1.6.2.jar. If you don't have it, please download it. Please refer to http://www.slf4j.org/codes.html#multiple_bindings

  • But I don't have that jar on my tcServer classpath, that is what confuses me. I don't understand how I don't need an additional jar in tcServer but do in WebSphere – DJ180 Sep 14 '11 at 20:21
  • 1
    Worked for me, and much simpler than the accepted answer. Version 1.7.7 worked too. – La-comadreja Apr 29 '14 at 18:14
  • 1
    I already had jul-to-slf4j in my pom.xml and just added slf4j-simple in before and it works fine. – slugmandrew May 21 '14 at 10:02

Simply add this to your pom.xml:

<dependency>
  <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
  <artifactId>slf4j-simple</artifactId>
  <version>1.7.21</version>
</dependency>
  • 1
    The solution worked for me; It is worth pointing to the documentation (where I found the error explained): slf4j.org/codes.html#StaticLoggerBinder – Witold Kaczurba Dec 23 '16 at 7:05
  • 2
    nothing else but this worked for me while running a simple kafka producer example. thanks a bunch! – Viren Apr 20 at 4:00

put file slf4j-log4j12-1.6.4.jar in the classpath will do the trick.

  • 4
    or add the dependency into your pom <dependency> <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId> <artifactId>slf4j-log4j12</artifactId> </dependency> – enkor Apr 15 '13 at 15:45

Sometime we should see the note from the warning, for example. SLF4J: See http://www.slf4j.org/codes.html#StaticLoggerBinder for further details..

You can search the reason why this warning comes.
Adding one of the jar from *slf4j-nop.jar, slf4j-simple.jar, slf4j-log4j12.jar, slf4j-jdk14.jar or logback-classic.jar* to the class path should solve the problem.

compile "org.slf4j:slf4j-api:1.6.1" compile "org.slf4j:slf4j-simple:1.6.1"

for example add the above code to your build.gradle or the corresponding code to pom.xml for maven project.

If you are using maven to dependency management so you can just add following dependency in pom.xml

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
    <artifactId>slf4j-log4j12</artifactId>
    <version>1.5.6</version>
</dependency>

For non-Maven users Just download the library and put it into your project classpath.

Here you can see details: http://www.mkyong.com/wicket/java-lang-classnotfoundexception-org-slf4j-impl-staticloggerbinder/

  • 1
    Also for maven users I found that I needed to add the following into pom.xml, which also brings in logback-core automatically: <dependency> <groupId>ch.qos.logback</groupId> <artifactId>logback-classic</artifactId> <version>1.0.9</version> </dependency> – Paul Aug 5 '15 at 12:07
  • 2
    This is not an error. This message tells you that you do not have any logger implementation (such as e.g. Logback) added in classpath, and therefore NOP (No Operation) log Look for sarxos comment as mentioned by @Paul need to add logback-classic. Another approach of change to <artifactId>slf4j-simple</artifactId> from <artifactId>slf4j-api</artifactId> also does the work. It is illustrated here – Abhijeet Nov 19 '15 at 11:50

I was facing same error. I have configured slf4j-api, slf4j-log4j12 and log4j, in my local development. All configuration was fine, but slf4j-log4j12 dependency which I copied from mvnrepository had test scope <scope>test</scope>. When I removed this every thing is fine.

Some times silly mistakes breaks our head ;)

  • Thanks a million! I hade the same issue and was about to give it up until I found your post! – Ergodyne Apr 13 at 14:36
  • This helped me also – cod3min3 May 27 at 7:58

SLF4j is an abstraction for various logging frameworks. Hence apart from having slf4j you need to include any of your logging framework like log4j or logback (etc) in your classpath.
To have an idea refer the First Baby Step in http://logback.qos.ch/manual/introduction.html

  • 1
    Adding logback fixed this for me. I dropped latest logback classic into pom (1.1.7) and it failed because slf4j dependency was too old (1.6.2). Downgrading logback to 1.0.0 and leaving slf4j at 1.6.x worked, as did upgrading slf4j to 1.7.20 and leaving logback at 1.1.7. – ECDragon Apr 9 '16 at 12:17

Slf4j is a facade for the underlying logging frameworks like log4j, logback, java.util.logging.

To connect with underlying frameworks, slf4j uses a binding.

  • log4j - slf4j-log4j12-1.7.21.jar
  • java.util.logging - slf4j-jdk14-1.7.21.jar etc

The above error is thrown if the binding jar is missed. You can download this jar and add it to classpath.

For maven dependency,

<dependency> 
  <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
  <artifactId>slf4j-log4j12</artifactId>
  <version>1.7.21</version>
</dependency>

This dependency in addition to slf4j-log4j12-1.7.21.jar,it will pull slf4j-api-1.7.21.jar as well as log4j-1.2.17.jar into your project

Reference: http://www.slf4j.org/manual.html

In the Websphere case, you have an older version of slf4j-api.jar, 1.4.x. or 1.5.x lying around somewhere. The behavior you observe on tcServer, that is fail-over to NOP, occurs on slf4j versions 1.6.0 and later. Make sure that you are using slf4j-api-1.6.x.jar on all platforms and that no older version of slf4j-api is placed on the class path.

  • Thanks, I've checked my WebSphere 6.1 classpath and I do not see any other version of slf4j e.g. I did a search on my WebSphere filesystem for slf4jjar and I only got my 1.6 version returned. Do you know if WebSphere comes packaged with slf4j? – DJ180 Sep 20 '11 at 18:26
  • Anything is possible but I'd be very surprised if WebSphere came bundled with slf4j-api. Weld bundles slf4j-api.jar. Are you using Weld? – Ceki Sep 21 '11 at 21:15

I got into this issue when I get the following error:

SLF4J: Failed to load class "org.slf4j.impl.StaticLoggerBinder".
SLF4J: Defaulting to no-operation (NOP) logger implementation
SLF4J: See http://www.slf4j.org/codes.html#StaticLoggerBinder for further details.

when I was using slf4j-api-1.7.5.jar in my libs.

Inspite I tried with the whole suggested complement jars, like slf4j-log4j12-1.7.5.jar, slf4j-simple-1.7.5 the error message still persisted. The problem finally was solved when I added slf4j-jdk14-1.7.5.jar to the java libs.

Get the whole slf4j package at http://www.slf4j.org/download.html

Please add the following dependencies to pom to resolve this issue.

<dependency>
  <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
  <artifactId>slf4j-simple</artifactId>
  <version>1.7.25</version>
  <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>

<dependency>
  <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
  <artifactId>slf4j-api</artifactId>
  <version>1.7.25</version>
</dependency>
  • I just included the first dependency - as pointed in another answer - and it works. Both dependencies do not solve the problem for me. – RubioRic Sep 14 '17 at 6:50
  • And want to use local maven instead of Bundled maven of Intellij. – Abdul Gaffar Jan 11 at 19:19

Quite a few answers here recommend adding the slf4j-simple dependency to your maven pom file. You might want to check for the most current version.

At https://mvnrepository.com/artifact/org.slf4j/slf4j-simple you'll find the latest version of the SLF4J Simple Binding. Pick the one that suites you best (still 1.7.25 from 2017-03 is the stable version as of 2018-02) and include it to your pom.xml.

You might want to remove the scope tag to make the dependency available in non - test cases.

Beta Version of January 2018

<!-- https://mvnrepository.com/artifact/org.slf4j/slf4j-simple -->
<dependency>
  <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
  <artifactId>slf4j-simple</artifactId>
  <version>1.8.0-beta1</version>
</dependency>

Stable Version

<!-- https://mvnrepository.com/artifact/org.slf4j/slf4j-simple -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
    <artifactId>slf4j-simple</artifactId>
    <version>1.7.25</version>
</dependency>
  • 2
    why do you use <scope>test</scope>? In my experience, I at least need runtime scope to ensure the slf4j-simple is on the classpath. Curious how you got this to work with only test scope... – ecoe Feb 14 at 0:44
  • Thank you for pointing this out. I removed the scope tag from my answer accordingly. It was a cut&paste issue - the link I am supplying provides the beta dependency this way. – Wolfgang Fahl Feb 14 at 5:58

I am working in a project Struts2+Spring. So it need a dependency slf4j-api-1.7.5.jar.

If I run the project, I am getting error like

Failed to load class "org.slf4j.impl.StaticLoggerBinder"

I solved my problem by adding the slf4j-log4j12-1.7.5.jar.

So add this jar in your project to solve the issue.

I was facing the similar problem with Spring-boot-2 applications with Java 9 library.

Adding the following dependency in my pom.xml solved the issue for me:

    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.googlecode.slf4j-maven-plugin-log</groupId>
        <artifactId>slf4j-maven-plugin-log</artifactId>
        <version>1.0.0</version>
    </dependency>

I added this dependency to resolve this issue:

https://mvnrepository.com/artifact/org.slf4j/slf4j-simple/1.7.25

As an alternative to the jar inclusion and pure maven solutions, you can include it from maven with gradle.

Example for version 1.7.25

// https://mvnrepository.com/artifact/org.slf4j/slf4j-simple
api group: 'org.slf4j', name: 'slf4j-simple', version: '1.7.25'

Put this within the dependencies of your build.gradle file.

I know this post is a little old, but in case anyone else runs into this problem:

Add slf4j-jdk14-X.X.X.jar to your CLASSPATH (where X.X.X is the version number - e.g. slf4j-jdk14-1.7.5.jar).

HTH Peter

According to SLF4J official documentation

Failed to load class org.slf4j.impl.StaticLoggerBinder

This warning message is reported when the org.slf4j.impl.StaticLoggerBinder class could not be loaded into memory. This happens when no appropriate SLF4J binding could be found on the class path. Placing one (and only one) of slf4j-nop.jar, slf4j-simple.jar, slf4j-log4j12.jar, slf4j-jdk14.jar or logback-classic.jar on the class path should solve the problem.

Simply add this jar along with slf4j api.jar to your classpath to get things done. Best of luck

I use Jena and I add the fellowing dependence to pom.xml

<dependency> 
  <groupId>ch.qos.logback</groupId>
  <artifactId>logback-classic</artifactId>
  <version>1.0.13</version>
</dependency>

I try to add slf4j-simple but it just disappear the "SLF4J: Failed to load class “org.slf4j.impl.StaticLoggerBinder”" error but logback-classic show more detail infomation.

The official document

I solve it adding this library: slf4j-simple-1.7.25.jar You can download this in official web https://www.slf4j.org/download.html

the solution is indicated on their official website :

Failed to load class org.slf4j.impl.StaticLoggerBinder

This warning message is reported when the org.slf4j.impl.StaticLoggerBinder class could not be loaded into memory. This happens when no appropriate SLF4J binding could be found on the class path. Placing one (and only one) of slf4j-nop.jar slf4j-simple.jar, slf4j-log4j12.jar, slf4j-jdk14.jar or logback-classic.jar on the class path should solve the problem. SINCE 1.6.0 As of SLF4J version 1.6, in the absence of a binding, SLF4J will default to a no-operation (NOP) logger implementation. If you are responsible for packaging an application and do not care about logging, then placing slf4j-nop.jar on the class path of your application will get rid of this warning message. Note that embedded components such as libraries or frameworks should not declare a dependency on any SLF4J binding but only depend on slf4j-api. When a library declares a compile-time dependency on a SLF4J binding, it imposes that binding on the end-user, thus negating SLF4J's purpose.

solution : I have added to my project using maven research on intellij and i have chosen the slf4j-jdk14.jar.

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