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I've never used iptables, and the documentation online seems a bit opaque.

I'd like to block all requests to port 8000 on my server except those coming from a specific IP address. How do I do that using iptables?

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    // , Would you be so kind as to share a link to the opaque documentation? Dec 14, 2015 at 22:38

3 Answers 3

167

This question should be on Server Fault. Nevertheless, the following should do the trick, assuming you're talking about TCP and the IP you want to allow is 1.2.3.4:

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 8000 -s 1.2.3.4 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 8000 -j DROP
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    How would you go about reversing this ip/port restriction you've setup here? (in case I want to undo this in the future)
    – tester
    Aug 17, 2013 at 2:47
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    tester, to remove stuff, refer to this - stackoverflow.com/questions/10197405/… Jan 16, 2014 at 21:08
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    I know this is relatively old, and this totally nailed what i needed. And since the answer has been accepted anyways, how do you do the same thing with a specific IP range? Thanks! :)
    – jagc
    Jun 25, 2014 at 9:44
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    @JiegoCordoviz You can add a mask to the source address: "-s 1.2.3.0/24" will accept from anything starting with "1.2.3.". Search for "netmask calculator" if you have a range and want to work out a netmask.
    – Jon Bright
    Jul 4, 2014 at 8:31
  • why might this not be working?
    – Dave Ankin
    Jun 6 at 12:49
18

Another alternative is;

sudo iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 8000 -s ! 1.2.3.4 -j DROP

I had similar issue that 3 bridged virtualmachine just need access eachother with different combination, so I have tested this command and it works well.

Edit**

According to Fernando comment and this link exclamation mark (!) will be placed before than -s parameter:

sudo iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 8000 ! -s 1.2.3.4 -j DROP
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    The exclamation point (!) must now be placed before the -s parameter: sudo iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 8000 -s ! 1.2.3.4 -j DROP. May 31, 2016 at 13:22
  • I'm not sure what does the exclamation mark do here. Is it any better than the accepted answer?
    – mehov
    Sep 30, 2019 at 9:21
  • @aexl pretty much same thing except single line
    – HRgiger
    Sep 30, 2019 at 10:35
7

You can always use iptables to delete the rules. If you have a lot of rules, just output them using the following command.

iptables-save > myfile

vi to edit them from the commend line. Just use the "dd" to delete the lines you no longer want.

iptables-restore < myfile and you're good to go.  

REMEMBER THAT IF YOU DON'T CONFIGURE YOUR OS TO SAVE THE RULES TO A FILE AND THEN LOAD THE FILE DURING THE BOOT THAT YOUR RULES WILL BE LOST.

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