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Context

I'm building a kernel in C++. I want to expose an interface to the kernel independent of the architecture implementation, so that the main kernel code can be architecture-agnostic. For example,

kernel.cpp

#include "Terminal.hpp"

void kernel_main()
{
    Terminal terminal;
    terminal.write("Hello, kernel!\n");
}

Terminal.hpp

class Terminal
{
public:
    void write(const char *str);

private:
    // members required for managing terminal output
};

where the implementation for Terminal is different for each architecture, and the compiler chooses the right object file to link based on the desired architecture target:

arch/x86/Terminal.cpp

Terminal::write(const char *str)
{
    // x86 specific way of writing to the terminal
}

Ideally, I want to have code that looks like kernel.cpp, where the implementation of Terminal changes depending on whether I decide to compile and link the project with arch/x86/Terminal.cpp, arch/mips/Terminal.cpp, or any other arch/<architecture>/Terminal.cpp.

Problem

The problem is that the private members of Terminal could differ depending on the architecture, depending on what is needed to manage terminal output for that specific architecture. I want a way to expose an abstract Terminal interface that does not define any implementation details (including differing private members).

Possible Solutions

Abstract Base Class

A solution might be to use an abstract base class. I want to avoid this because of the overhead of run-time polymorphism, and the fact that the desired Terminal type doesn't need to be determined at run-time since it's already known at compile-time (through knowledge of which architecture is being targeted).

PIMPL

Another solution could be to use the PIMPL idiom, but I also want to avoid this because of the overhead of allocating memory on the heap for the implementation and pointer indirection.

CRTF

The CRTF template pattern seems close to what I want, but I'm not sure how to use it without specifying the architecture I'm targeting in the form of a template parameter (which would make the kernel code not architecture-agnostic):

kernel.cpp

void kernel_main()
{
    Terminal<x86> terminal;
    terminal.write("Hello, kernel!\n");
}

What's the simplest and most idiomatic way to do this in C++?

3
  • 1
    There are no zero cost abstractions - it's a myth. C++ gets close, but there's always a cost. Sometimes it's a run time cost. Sometimes it's a compile time cost. Sometimes it's a readability cost. Sometimes it's a complexity cost that causes a human to waste hours. Regardless, there's always some cost. Nov 2, 2022 at 19:20
  • @JesperJuhl I should have specified "zero-runtime cost abstraction" in the title, as in the way people usually talk about C++ having "zero-cost abstractions" (when they mean runtime).
    – dav
    Nov 2, 2022 at 19:22
  • 1
    How about a mix of CRTP and macros to define the architecture(s)? You could set the macros using the compiler or your build system (e.g. use CMake's configure_file).
    – joergbrech
    Nov 2, 2022 at 19:27

1 Answer 1

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As suggested in the comment, you could mix CRTP with macro preprocessor definitions. You could use a build system like CMake to conveniently set these definitions for you.

architecture.h.in

This is a header file to be prepared by CMake. CMake is to replace @ARCHITECTURE@ with the architecture of you choice and store the configured file in the binary/build directory:

#pragma once 

#define ARCH_STR "@ARCHITECTURE@"
#define ARCH @ARCHITECTURE@

main.cpp

This represents your kernel code (which would surely be separated into several files)

#include "architecture.h"
#include <iostream>

template <typename Derived>
class Terminal {
    Derived& downcast(){
        return static_cast<Derived&>(*this);
    };

    Derived const& downcast() const {
        return static_cast<Derived const&>(*this);
    }

public:
    void write(const char* str) const {
        downcast().write(str);
    }
};

class x86_64: public Terminal<x86_64>
{
public:
    void write(const char* str) const {
        std::cout << std::string("Hello ") + std::string(str) + " from x86_64\n";
    }
};

class x86: public Terminal<x86>
{
public:
    void write(const char* str) const {
        std::cout << std::string("Hello ") + std::string(str) + " from x86\n";
    }
};


int main(){
    Terminal<ARCH> terminal;
    terminal.write("dav");
}

CMakeLists.txt

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.1)
project(test)

configure_file(
    architecture.h.in
    architecture.h
)
include_directories(${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR})

add_executable(test main.cpp)

Building

mkdir build && cd build
cmake .. -DARCHITECTURE=x86_64
cmake --build .

See here for a demo. This is just a small example to get you started. You would probably want to automate setting the ARCHITECTURE definition through your cross compilation process. But this is where I leave my comfort zone.

3
  • I'm honestly not sure I understand why you need CRTP and a macro here. Wouldn't it be much simpler to just have the "interface" being the class definition (in its own header file) and replacing which implementation cpp file gets picked by the build system? Nov 2, 2022 at 22:28
  • 1
    I probably oversimplified. For this example: Yes, it would be much simpler. But @dav explicitly stated that the declaration of the private members of the interface class depend on the architecture. I left these private members out.
    – joergbrech
    Nov 2, 2022 at 22:33
  • Ah, I missed that part of the problem statement in the question Nov 2, 2022 at 22:35

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