310

I need to convert a value which is in a DateTime variable into a varchar variable formatted as yyyy-mm-dd format (without time part).

How do I do that?

23 Answers 23

267

With Microsoft Sql Server:

--
-- Create test case
--
DECLARE @myDateTime DATETIME
SET @myDateTime = '2008-05-03'

--
-- Convert string
--
SELECT LEFT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, @myDateTime, 120), 10)
  • 12
    For those of you who may be interested, this would perform better if you change VARCHAR to CHAR. See this post (stackoverflow.com/questions/59667/…) for more details. Essentially, there are 2 bytes of overhead involved in VARCHAR vs CHAR. In this scenario, we know that your string will always be 10 characters, so CHAR is appropriate. – Will Ediger Dec 30 '14 at 23:04
  • 1
    Side note, from what I've seen, too bad none of the formats honors whatever the DATEFORMAT is set to, maybe there is another way. – Alex Nolasco May 15 '15 at 16:07
  • 3
    Is there any reason to use LEFT(.., 10) instead of CONVERT(CHAR(10), ...)? Also those working with the newer versions of SQL Server than 2005(!) should check out the answer by Zar Shardan suggesting a solution based on FORMAT(date_value, format_string) function. – Nickolay Jan 25 '17 at 15:28
  • @Nickolay besides FORMAT() is too slow relative to convert(char(10),...) – abdul qayyum Nov 2 '17 at 10:08
388

Here's some test sql for all the styles.

DECLARE @now datetime
SET @now = GETDATE()
select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 0) as output, 0 as style 
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 1), 1
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 2), 2
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 3), 3
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 4), 4
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 5), 5
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 6), 6
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 7), 7
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 8), 8
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 9), 9
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 10), 10
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 11), 11
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 12), 12
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 13), 13
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 14), 14
--15 to 19 not valid
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 20), 20
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 21), 21
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 22), 22
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 23), 23
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 24), 24
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 25), 25
--26 to 99 not valid
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 100), 100
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 101), 101
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 102), 102
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 103), 103
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 104), 104
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 105), 105
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 106), 106
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 107), 107
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 108), 108
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 109), 109
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 110), 110
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 111), 111
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 112), 112
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 113), 113
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 114), 114
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 120), 120
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 121), 121
--122 to 125 not valid
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 126), 126
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 127), 127
--128, 129 not valid
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 130), 130
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 131), 131
--132 not valid
order BY style

Here's the result

output                   style
Apr 28 2014  9:31AM          0
04/28/14                     1
14.04.28                     2
28/04/14                     3
28.04.14                     4
28-04-14                     5
28 Apr 14                    6
Apr 28, 14                   7
09:31:28                     8
Apr 28 2014  9:31:28:580AM   9
04-28-14                     10
14/04/28                     11
140428                       12
28 Apr 2014 09:31:28:580     13
09:31:28:580                 14
2014-04-28 09:31:28          20
2014-04-28 09:31:28.580      21
04/28/14  9:31:28 AM         22
2014-04-28                   23
09:31:28                     24
2014-04-28 09:31:28.580      25
Apr 28 2014  9:31AM          100
04/28/2014                   101
2014.04.28                   102
28/04/2014                   103
28.04.2014                   104
28-04-2014                   105
28 Apr 2014                  106
Apr 28, 2014                 107
09:31:28                     108
Apr 28 2014  9:31:28:580AM   109
04-28-2014                   110
2014/04/28                   111
20140428                     112
28 Apr 2014 09:31:28:580     113
09:31:28:580                 114
2014-04-28 09:31:28          120
2014-04-28 09:31:28.580      121
2014-04-28T09:31:28.580      126
2014-04-28T09:31:28.580      127
28 جمادى الثانية 1435  9:31:28:580AM    130
28/06/1435  9:31:28:580AM    131

Make nvarchar(max) shorter to trim the time. For example:

select convert(nvarchar(11), GETDATE(), 0)
union select convert(nvarchar(max), GETDATE(), 0)

outputs:

May 18 2018
May 18 2018  9:57AM
  • Here Sometimes we want like dd-mm or jun - 28. There is any option?? – Rock May 24 '16 at 14:32
  • Works for SQL Server 2005 so this is great for those of us that are still unfortunately meddling with older systems. Upgrading to 2014 soon, excited! – dyslexicanaboko Aug 26 '16 at 17:38
  • I wanna format close to 101 -- 101 = 04/28/2014 , I wanna without zero in the month , output 4/28/2014, is it applicable ? – ahmed abdelqader Nov 10 '16 at 7:35
  • 1
    Isn't the timezone identifier Z missing in style 127. – Atishay Sep 1 '17 at 7:48
  • @Atishay "only supported when casting from character data to datetime or smalldatetime". See the footnotes 6 and 7 at docs.microsoft.com/de-de/sql/t-sql/functions/… – Colin Sep 4 '17 at 11:15
186

Try the following:

CONVERT(varchar(10), [MyDateTimecolumn], 20)

For a full date time and not just date do:

CONVERT(varchar(23), [MyDateTimecolumn], 121)

See this page for convert styles:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187928.aspx
OR
SQL Server CONVERT() Function

39

SQL Server 2012 has a new function , FORMAT: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee634924.aspx

and you can use custom date time format strings: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee634398.aspx

These pages imply it is also available on SQL2008R2, but I don't have one handy to test if that's the case.

Example usage (Australian datetime):

FORMAT(VALUE,'dd/MM/yyyy h:mm:ss tt')
9

You can use DATEPART(DATEPART, VARIABLE). For example:

DECLARE @DAY INT 
DECLARE @MONTH INT
DECLARE @YEAR INT
DECLARE @DATE DATETIME
@DATE = GETDATE()
SELECT @DAY = DATEPART(DAY,@DATE)
SELECT @MONTH = DATEPART(MONTH,@DATE)
SELECT @YEAR = DATEPART(YEAR,@DATE)
8

Either Cast or Convert:

Syntax for CAST:

CAST ( expression AS data_type [ (length ) ])

Syntax for CONVERT:

CONVERT ( data_type [ ( length ) ] , expression [ , style ] )

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187928.aspx

Actually since you asked for a specific format:

REPLACE(CONVERT(varchar(10), Date, 102), '.', '-')
7

-- This gives you the time as 0 in format 'yyyy-mm-dd 00:00:00.000'


SELECT CAST( CONVERT(VARCHAR, GETDATE(), 101) AS DATETIME) ; 
6

With Microsoft SQL Server:

Use Syntax for CONVERT:

CONVERT ( data_type [ ( length ) ] , expression [ , style ] )

Example:

SELECT CONVERT(varchar,d.dateValue,1-9)

For the style you can find more info here: MSDN - Cast and Convert (Transact-SQL).

3

Try:

select replace(convert(varchar, getdate(), 111),'/','-');

More on ms sql tips

3

The OP mentioned datetime format. For me, the time part gets in the way.
I think it's a bit cleaner to remove the time portion (by casting datetime to date) before formatting.

convert( varchar(10), convert( date, @yourDate ) , 111 )
3

This is how I do it: CONVERT(NVARCHAR(10), DATE1, 103) )

3

Try the following:

CONVERT(VARCHAR(10),GetDate(),102)

Then you would need to replace the "." with "-".

Here is a site that helps http://www.mssqltips.com/tip.asp?tip=1145

3
declare @dt datetime

set @dt = getdate()

select convert(char(10),@dt,120) 

I have fixed data length of char(10) as you want a specific string format.

2

The shortest and the simplest way is :

DECLARE @now AS DATETIME = GETDATE()

SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR, @now, 23)
  • yeah, seriously! well done. i had to laugh at how complex the other solutions are. – pdp Jan 6 at 2:39
2

You can convert your date in many formats, the syntaxe is simple to use :

CONVERT('TheTypeYouWant', 'TheDateToConvert', 'TheCodeForFormating' * )
CONVERT(NVARCHAR(10), DATE_OF_DAY, 103) => 15/09/2016
  • The code is an integer, here 3 is the third formating without century, if you want the century just change the code to 103.

In your case, i've just converted and restrict size by nvarchar(10) like this :

CONVERT(NVARCHAR(10), MY_DATE_TIME, 120) => 2016-09-15

See more at : http://www.w3schools.com/sql/func_convert.asp

Another solution (if your date is a Datetime) is a simple CAST :

CAST(MY_DATE_TIME as DATE) => 2016-09-15
2

Try this SQL:

select REPLACE(CONVERT(VARCHAR(24),GETDATE(),103),'/','_') + '_'+ 
       REPLACE(CONVERT(VARCHAR(24),GETDATE(),114),':','_')
2

For SQL Server 2008+ You can use CONVERT and FORMAT together.

For example, for European style (e.g. Germany) timestamp:

CONVERT(VARCHAR, FORMAT(GETDATE(), 'dd.MM.yyyy HH:mm:ss', 'de-DE'))
1

You did not say which database, but with mysql here is an easy way to get a date from a timestamp (and the varchar type conversion should happen automatically):

mysql> select date(now());
+-------------+
| date(now()) |
+-------------+
| 2008-09-16  | 
+-------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
  • 1
    Check again: he specified sql server via a tag. – Joel Coehoorn Sep 16 '08 at 16:51
1
CONVERT(VARCHAR, GETDATE(), 23)
1
DECLARE @DateTime DATETIME
SET @DateTime = '2018-11-23 10:03:23'
SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR(100),@DateTime,121 )
0

Write a function

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.TO_SAP_DATETIME(@input datetime)
RETURNS VARCHAR(14)
AS BEGIN
    DECLARE @ret VARCHAR(14)
    SET @ret = COALESCE(SUBSTRING(REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(CONVERT(VARCHAR(26), @input, 25),'-',''),' ',''),':',''),1,14),'00000000000000');
    RETURN @ret
END
0
select REPLACE(CONVERT(VARCHAR, FORMAT(GETDATE(), N'dd/MM/yyyy hh:mm:ss tt')),'.', '/')

will give 05/05/2020 10:41:05 AM as a result

-3

You don't say what language but I am assuming C#/.NET because it has a native DateTime data type. In that case just convert it using the ToString method and use a format specifier such as:

DateTime d = DateTime.Today;
string result = d.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd");

However, I would caution against using this in a database query or concatenated into a SQL statement. Databases require a specific formatting string to be used. You are better off zeroing out the time part and using the DateTime as a SQL parameter if that is what you are trying to accomplish.

  • In the question, it's mentioned "I am working on a query in Sql Server 2005". – InkHeart Aug 23 '16 at 1:04
  • 4
    @InkHeart and all the down-voters - This answer was posted in 2008. If you check the history of edits for the original question there were no tags and/or any other technology-related information included. – GSazheniuk Apr 6 '17 at 21:33

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