504

I want to remove the last character from a string. I've tried doing this:

public String method(String str) {
    if (str.charAt(str.length()-1)=='x'){
        str = str.replace(str.substring(str.length()-1), "");
        return str;
    } else{
        return str;
    }
}

Getting the length of the string - 1 and replacing the last letter with nothing (deleting it), but every time I run the program, it deletes middle letters that are the same as the last letter.

For example, the word is "admirer"; after I run the method, I get "admie." I want it to return the word admire.

33 Answers 33

693

replace will replace all instances of a letter. All you need to do is use substring():

public String method(String str) {
    if (str != null && str.length() > 0 && str.charAt(str.length() - 1) == 'x') {
        str = str.substring(0, str.length() - 1);
    }
    return str;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    I'd add null != str && at the beginning of the check. – James Oravec Sep 28 '13 at 16:31
  • 12
    you mean str != null &&! – SSpoke Feb 9 '14 at 5:50
  • 3
    @SSpoke it's the same thing, yours is just a little nicer to read :) – Marko Jun 26 '14 at 8:41
  • 6
    @Marko lol yes since it's the standard, feels odd when people make their own stuff up. – SSpoke Jun 26 '14 at 19:15
  • 28
    @AdamJensen In C you could accidentally write if (str = NULL) which will not only always evaluate to false (NULL == 0 == false) but will also assign a value to str which is most likely not what you wanted to do. You could not write if (NULL = str) however because NULL is not a variable and cannot be assigned to. So, it is a safer convention to put the NULL on the left. This isn't an issue in Java though. – Gyan aka Gary Buyn Jul 26 '14 at 0:31
245

Why not just one liner?

public static String removeLastChar(String str) {
    return removeLastChars(str, 1);
}

public static String removeLastChars(String str, int chars) {
    return str.substring(0, str.length() - chars);
}

Full Code

public class Main {
    public static void main (String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception {
        String s1 = "Remove Last CharacterY";
        String s2 = "Remove Last Character2";
        System.out.println("After removing s1==" + removeLastChar(s1) + "==");
        System.out.println("After removing s2==" + removeLastChar(s2) + "==");
    }
    
    public static String removeLastChar(String str) {
        return removeLastChars(str, 1);
    }

    public static String removeLastChars(String str, int chars) {
        return str.substring(0, str.length() - chars);
    }
}

Demo

| improve this answer | |
  • 10
    The check for null and empty string should be considered.. @BobBobBob version is better – KDjava Dec 22 '12 at 10:23
  • 1
    @KDjava : above is valid with considering that valid string is passed. else I would have to add the try catch block also to check that string is correct... – Fahim Parkar Dec 22 '12 at 11:03
  • i added check for null string before return str.substring(0,str.length()-1); as improvement – shareef Jul 7 '13 at 6:24
  • Thanks this source is in use at gist.github.com/CrandellWS/e254a215c54aa4be0400a3511a23f730 – CrandellWS Apr 28 '16 at 1:06
  • @FahimParkar: Because it may be possible that last character is not the character that we want to remove. But as per the question, your answer is correct – Ash18 Sep 17 '18 at 11:32
93

Since we're on a subject, one can use regular expressions too

"aaabcd".replaceFirst(".$",""); //=> aaabc  
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  • 3
    nice way, when you want/need to define exactly what you want to trim from the end of the string, not just X whatever chars – Julien Jul 15 '16 at 13:16
78

The described problem and proposed solutions sometimes relate to removing separators. If this is your case, then have a look at Apache Commons StringUtils, it has a method called removeEnd which is very elegant.

Example:

StringUtils.removeEnd("string 1|string 2|string 3|", "|");

Would result in: "string 1|string 2|string 3"

| improve this answer | |
47
public String removeLastChar(String s) {
    if (s == null || s.length() == 0) {
        return s;
    }
    return s.substring(0, s.length()-1);
}
| improve this answer | |
35

Don't try to reinvent the wheel, while others have already written libraries to perform string manipulation: org.apache.commons.lang3.StringUtils.chop()

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    If you want to remove the last character ONLY - this is the best answer! – iaforek May 17 '17 at 13:26
  • No it isn't, because "use Java" is a terrible answer to a Kotlin question. – Mikkel Løkke Mar 28 '19 at 15:59
  • 4
    @MikkelLøkke I don't know, but this question is not a Kotlin question in any case?? – membersound Mar 29 '19 at 7:35
19

Use this:

 if(string.endsWith("x")) {

    string= string.substring(0, string.length() - 1);
 }
| improve this answer | |
16

In Kotlin you can used dropLast() method of the string class. It will drop the given number from string, return a new string

var string1 = "Some Text"
string1 = string1.dropLast(1)
| improve this answer | |
11
if (str.endsWith("x")) {
  return str.substring(0, str.length() - 1);
}
return str;

For example, the word is "admirer"; after I run the method, I get "admie." I want it to return the word admire.

In case you're trying to stem English words

Stemming is the process for reducing inflected (or sometimes derived) words to their stem, base or root form—generally a written word form.

...

A stemmer for English, for example, should identify the string "cats" (and possibly "catlike", "catty" etc.) as based on the root "cat", and "stemmer", "stemming", "stemmed" as based on "stem". A stemming algorithm reduces the words "fishing", "fished", "fish", and "fisher" to the root word, "fish".

Difference between Lucene stemmers: EnglishStemmer, PorterStemmer, LovinsStemmer outlines some Java options.

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9

As far as the readability is concerned, I find this to be the most concise

StringUtils.substring("string", 0, -1);

The negative indexes can be used in Apache's StringUtils utility. All negative numbers are treated from offset from the end of the string.

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  • I wouldn't say this is the best answer - for simplicity use org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils.chop() method. Yet, the trick with -1 is really nice and looking at the other answers is not really used / well known. – iaforek May 17 '17 at 13:30
4
public String removeLastChar(String s) {
    if (!Util.isEmpty(s)) {
        s = s.substring(0, s.length()-1);
    }
    return s;
}
| improve this answer | |
4

removes last occurence of the 'xxx':

    System.out.println("aaa xxx aaa xxx ".replaceAll("xxx([^xxx]*)$", "$1"));

removes last occurrence of the 'xxx' if it is last:

    System.out.println("aaa xxx aaa  ".replaceAll("xxx\\s*$", ""));

you can replace the 'xxx' on what you want but watch out on special chars

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4
 // creating StringBuilder
 StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(requestString);
 // removing last character from String
 builder.deleteCharAt(requestString.length() - 1);
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3

Look to StringBuilder Class :

    StringBuilder sb=new StringBuilder("toto,");
    System.out.println(sb.deleteCharAt(sb.length()-1));//display "toto"
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2
// Remove n last characters  
// System.out.println(removeLast("Hello!!!333",3));

public String removeLast(String mes, int n) {
    return mes != null && !mes.isEmpty() && mes.length()>n
         ? mes.substring(0, mes.length()-n): mes;
}

// Leave substring before character/string  
// System.out.println(leaveBeforeChar("Hello!!!123", "1"));

public String leaveBeforeChar(String mes, String last) {
    return mes != null && !mes.isEmpty() && mes.lastIndexOf(last)!=-1
         ? mes.substring(0, mes.lastIndexOf(last)): mes;
}
| improve this answer | |
2

A one-liner answer (just a funny alternative - do not try this at home, and great answers already given):

public String removeLastChar(String s){return (s != null && s.length() != 0) ? s.substring(0, s.length() - 1): s;}
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2

Why not use the escape sequence ... !

System.out.println(str + '\b');

Life is much easier now . XD ! ~ A readable one-liner

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2

Most answers here forgot about surrogate pairs.

For instance, the character 𝕫 (codepoint U+1D56B) does not fit into a single char, so in order to be represented, it must form a surrogate pair of two chars.

If one simply applies the currently accepted answer (using str.substring(0, str.length() - 1), one splices the surrogate pair, leading to unexpected results.

One should also include a check whether the last character is a surrogate pair:

public static String removeLastChar(String str) {
    Objects.requireNonNull(str, "The string should not be null");
    if (str.isEmpty()) {
        return str;
    }

    char lastChar = str.charAt(str.length() - 1);
    int cut = Character.isSurrogate(lastChar) ? 2 : 1;
    return str.substring(0, str.length() - cut);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • On a corner case : can this ever throw IndexOutOfBoundsException ? (e.g. is it possible that Character.isSurrogate returns true when there is actually no char before it, making str.length()-cut negative). – GPI Aug 14 '19 at 13:28
  • Yes, that's possible. It's an invalid string anyway, but still – it's possible, yes. One should then replace 2 by Math.min(2, str.length()). – MC Emperor Aug 14 '19 at 21:49
2
 string = string.substring(0, (string.length() - 1));

I'm using this in my code, it's easy and simple. it only works while the String is > 0. I have it connected to a button and inside the following if statement

if (string.length() > 0) {
    string = string.substring(0, (string.length() - 1));
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Java 8

import java.util.Optional;

public class Test
{
  public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException
  {
    System.out.println(removeLastChar("test-abc"));
  }

  public static String removeLastChar(String s) {
    return Optional.ofNullable(s)
      .filter(str -> str.length() != 0)
      .map(str -> str.substring(0, str.length() - 1))
      .orElse(s);
    }
}

Output : test-ab

| improve this answer | |
1
public String removeLastCharacter(String str){
       String result = null;
        if ((str != null) && (str.length() > 0)) {
          return str.substring(0, str.length() - 1);
        }
        else{
            return "";
        }

}
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0

if you have special character like ; in json just use String.replace(";", "") otherwise you must rewrite all character in string minus the last.

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0

How to make the char in the recursion at the end:

public static String  removeChar(String word, char charToRemove)
    {
        String char_toremove=Character.toString(charToRemove);
        for(int i = 0; i < word.length(); i++)
        {
            if(word.charAt(i) == charToRemove)
            {
                String newWord = word.substring(0, i) + word.substring(i + 1);
                return removeChar(newWord,charToRemove);
            }
        }
        System.out.println(word);
        return word;
    }

for exemple:

removeChar ("hello world, let's go!",'l') → "heo word, et's go!llll"
removeChar("you should not go",'o') → "yu shuld nt goooo"
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0

Here's an answer that works with codepoints outside of the Basic Multilingual Plane (Java 8+).

Using streams:

public String method(String str) {
    return str.codePoints()
            .limit(str.codePoints().count() - 1)
            .mapToObj(i->new String(Character.toChars(i)))
            .collect(Collectors.joining());
}

More efficient maybe:

public String method(String str) {
    return str.isEmpty()? "": str.substring(0, str.length() - Character.charCount(str.codePointBefore(str.length())));
}
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0

We can use substring. Here's the example,

public class RemoveStringChar 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {   
        String strGiven = "Java";
        System.out.println("Before removing string character - " + strGiven);
        System.out.println("After removing string character - " + removeCharacter(strGiven, 3));
    }

    public static String removeCharacter(String strRemove, int position)
    {   
        return strRemove.substring(0, position) + strRemove.substring(position + 1);    
    }
}
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0

just replace the condition of "if" like this:

if(a.substring(a.length()-1).equals("x"))'

this will do the trick for you.

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0

Suppose total length of my string=24 I want to cut last character after position 14 to end, mean I want starting 14 to be there. So I apply following solution.

String date = "2019-07-31T22:00:00.000Z";
String result = date.substring(0, date.length() - 14);
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0

I had to write code for a similar problem. One way that I was able to solve it used a recursive method of coding.

static String removeChar(String word, char charToRemove)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < word.lenght(); i++)
    {
        if(word.charAt(i) == charToRemove)
        {
            String newWord = word.substring(0, i) + word.substring(i + 1);
            return removeChar(newWord, charToRemove);
        }
    }

    return word;
}

Most of the code I've seen on this topic doesn't use recursion so hopefully I can help you or someone who has the same problem.

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0

Easy Peasy:

StringBuilder sb= new StringBuilder();
for(Entry<String,String> entry : map.entrySet()) {
        sb.append(entry.getKey() + "_" + entry.getValue() + "|");
}
String requiredString = sb.substring(0, sb.length() - 1);
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0

If you want to remove specific character at the end you could use:

myString.removeSuffix("x")
| improve this answer | |

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