I'm writing a modal dialog in WPF. How do I set a WPF window to not have a close button? I'd still like for its WindowState to have a normal title bar.

I found ResizeMode, WindowState, and WindowStyle, but none of those properties allow me to hide the close button but show the title bar, as in modal dialogs.

  • Does your modal dialog have a cancel button? If so, could you treat hitting the close button the same as pressing Cancel? – Andy Apr 13 '09 at 14:13
  • 9
    It's a progress dialog running a background thread that doesn't support cancelling; I guess I'm just trying to make it so I don't have to support cancelling (yet). You're probably right, though. – Michael Hedgpeth Apr 13 '09 at 14:18
  • 1
    I also hate apps trying to remove window chrome. If I make a progress dialog, I always make the window Close button do the same logic as clicking the actual Cancel button. – Christian Hayter Jul 9 '10 at 10:09
  • 13
    For Chris: Lets imagine your software is for Video Surveillance. A security Agent during the night HAS (that's his job) to keep the windows opened... but sometimes their work is boring and they want to surf Internet or close the Video Matrices windows for any reason, removing the windows buttons is the proper way to do it. – Jean-Marie Jun 30 '12 at 20:26
  • 5
    @ChrisUpchurch, "Why do you want to do this? It strikes me as really lousy UI design. " - really "lousy UI design" is when a program presents a dialog box with OK; Cancel and Close buttons. To a user, it may not be obvious what Close does. Does it cancel or submit? Consensus is not to include close buttons in dialogs so there is that – MickyD Nov 3 '14 at 6:20

19 Answers 19

up vote 250 down vote accepted

WPF doesn't have a built-in property to hide the title bar's Close button, but you can do it with a few lines of P/Invoke.

First, add these declarations to your Window class:

private const int GWL_STYLE = -16;
private const int WS_SYSMENU = 0x80000;
[DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
private static extern int GetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex);
[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern int SetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex, int dwNewLong);

Then put this code in the Window's Loaded event:

var hwnd = new WindowInteropHelper(this).Handle;
SetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_STYLE, GetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_STYLE) & ~WS_SYSMENU);

And there you go: no more Close button. You also won't have a window icon on the left side of the title bar, which means no System menu, even when you right-click the title bar -- they all go together.

Note that Alt+F4 will still close the Window. If you don't want to allow the window to close before the background thread is done, then you could also override OnClosing and set Cancel to true, as Gabe suggested.

  • 5
    According to the docs we should be using SetWindowLongPtr instead. – Jonathan Allen Jul 26 '10 at 21:42
  • 14
    Mostly a note to self... Namespace of DllImport -> System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport. Namespace of WindowInteropHelper -> System.Windows.Interop.WindowInteropHelper – doobop Oct 28 '10 at 15:21
  • 3
    Actually, this approach hides all three buttons (Min, Max and Close). Is it possible to just hide the Close button? – newman May 14 '13 at 14:58
  • 4
    @miliu, nope. You can disable it, but you can't hide it without hiding Minimize/Maximize as well. I suspect the Windows devs thought it would be confusing if Maximize was on the right where Close usually is. – Joe White May 15 '13 at 2:49
  • 1
    Put WindowStyle="None" on your Window tag in the XAML file. – diegodsp Aug 12 '15 at 18:21

I just got to similar problem and Joe White's solution seems to me simple and clean. I reused it and defined it as an attached property of Window

public class WindowBehavior
{
    private static readonly Type OwnerType = typeof (WindowBehavior);

    #region HideCloseButton (attached property)

    public static readonly DependencyProperty HideCloseButtonProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
            "HideCloseButton",
            typeof (bool),
            OwnerType,
            new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(false, new PropertyChangedCallback(HideCloseButtonChangedCallback)));

    [AttachedPropertyBrowsableForType(typeof(Window))]
    public static bool GetHideCloseButton(Window obj) {
        return (bool)obj.GetValue(HideCloseButtonProperty);
    }

    [AttachedPropertyBrowsableForType(typeof(Window))]
    public static void SetHideCloseButton(Window obj, bool value) {
        obj.SetValue(HideCloseButtonProperty, value);
    }

    private static void HideCloseButtonChangedCallback(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var window = d as Window;
        if (window == null) return;

        var hideCloseButton = (bool)e.NewValue;
        if (hideCloseButton && !GetIsHiddenCloseButton(window)) {
            if (!window.IsLoaded) {
                window.Loaded += HideWhenLoadedDelegate;
            }
            else {
                HideCloseButton(window);
            }
            SetIsHiddenCloseButton(window, true);
        }
        else if (!hideCloseButton && GetIsHiddenCloseButton(window)) {
            if (!window.IsLoaded) {
                window.Loaded -= ShowWhenLoadedDelegate;
            }
            else {
                ShowCloseButton(window);
            }
            SetIsHiddenCloseButton(window, false);
        }
    }

    #region Win32 imports

    private const int GWL_STYLE = -16;
    private const int WS_SYSMENU = 0x80000;
    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern int GetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex);
    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    private static extern int SetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex, int dwNewLong);

    #endregion

    private static readonly RoutedEventHandler HideWhenLoadedDelegate = (sender, args) => {
        if (sender is Window == false) return;
        var w = (Window)sender;
        HideCloseButton(w);
        w.Loaded -= HideWhenLoadedDelegate;
    };

    private static readonly RoutedEventHandler ShowWhenLoadedDelegate = (sender, args) => {
        if (sender is Window == false) return;
        var w = (Window)sender;
        ShowCloseButton(w);
        w.Loaded -= ShowWhenLoadedDelegate;
    };

    private static void HideCloseButton(Window w) {
        var hwnd = new WindowInteropHelper(w).Handle;
        SetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_STYLE, GetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_STYLE) & ~WS_SYSMENU);
    }

    private static void ShowCloseButton(Window w) {
        var hwnd = new WindowInteropHelper(w).Handle;
        SetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_STYLE, GetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_STYLE) | WS_SYSMENU);
    }

    #endregion

    #region IsHiddenCloseButton (readonly attached property)

    private static readonly DependencyPropertyKey IsHiddenCloseButtonKey =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttachedReadOnly(
            "IsHiddenCloseButton",
            typeof (bool),
            OwnerType,
            new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(false));

    public static readonly DependencyProperty IsHiddenCloseButtonProperty =
        IsHiddenCloseButtonKey.DependencyProperty;

    [AttachedPropertyBrowsableForType(typeof(Window))]
    public static bool GetIsHiddenCloseButton(Window obj) {
        return (bool)obj.GetValue(IsHiddenCloseButtonProperty);
    }

    private static void SetIsHiddenCloseButton(Window obj, bool value) {
        obj.SetValue(IsHiddenCloseButtonKey, value);
    }

    #endregion

}

Then in XAML you just set it like this:

<Window 
    x:Class="WafClient.Presentation.Views.SampleWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:u="clr-namespace:WafClient.Presentation.Behaviors"
    ResizeMode="NoResize"
    u:WindowBehavior.HideCloseButton="True">
    ...
</Window>

Set WindowStyle property to None which will hide the control box along with the title bar. No need to kernal calls.

  • 17
    Well, this will hide the window title bar completely. That means you don't get window title and user will not be able to move the window. – newman May 14 '13 at 15:00
  • 5
    You can make the window movable by adding this.DragMove(); to the window's MouseDown event – paul Feb 20 '14 at 21:55
  • 1
    For a modal dialog that should be purely informational and mandatory, like progress on upgrading a database with an old schema that has been opened, this solution is perfect. – The Lonely Coder Dec 3 '14 at 12:08
  • 1
    I think some people would like to have a border, though – pjdupreez Jan 8 '15 at 14:15
  • 1
    Definitely the best solution. There is no problem with adding border to panel, or implementing moving. – buks Jul 20 '17 at 13:49

This won't get rid of the close button, but it will stop someone closing the window.

Put this in your code behind file:

protected override void OnClosing(CancelEventArgs e)
{
   base.OnClosing(e);
   e.Cancel = true;
}
  • 7
    Be aware that doing this in a Window that is set up as a modal dialog will interfere with the Window setting its DialogResult property and may make it unusable. stackoverflow.com/questions/898708/cant-set-dialogresult-in-wpf – Sheridan Aug 13 '12 at 10:28
  • 4
    I was getting an overflow using this method, I took out base.OnClosing(e) and then it worked – jacobsgriffith Jun 20 '14 at 16:41
  • 7
    As a user i would hate the programmer who put this into their application – UrbanEsc May 20 '15 at 8:58
  • 1
    @UrbanEsc I would tend to agree that its an annoying thing to do, but when I did this - and it was only the one time - it was a mandatory requirement, and it was a necessary evil, there was some very important process going on that could not be interrupted and the app couldn't proceed until it was done. There were other ways it could have been done (a background thread, with the UI disabled until ready) but the boss and client both liked it this way because it emphasised the gravity of the process. – flurbius Jul 29 '17 at 20:51

To disable close button you should add the following code to your Window class (the code was taken from here, edited and reformatted a bit):

protected override void OnSourceInitialized(EventArgs e)
{
    base.OnSourceInitialized(e);

    HwndSource hwndSource = PresentationSource.FromVisual(this) as HwndSource;

    if (hwndSource != null)
    {
        hwndSource.AddHook(HwndSourceHook);
    }

}

private bool allowClosing = false;

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern IntPtr GetSystemMenu(IntPtr hWnd, bool bRevert);
[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern bool EnableMenuItem(IntPtr hMenu, uint uIDEnableItem, uint uEnable);

private const uint MF_BYCOMMAND = 0x00000000;
private const uint MF_GRAYED = 0x00000001;

private const uint SC_CLOSE = 0xF060;

private const int WM_SHOWWINDOW = 0x00000018;
private const int WM_CLOSE = 0x10;

private IntPtr HwndSourceHook(IntPtr hwnd, int msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, ref bool handled)
{
    switch (msg)
    {
        case WM_SHOWWINDOW:
            {
                IntPtr hMenu = GetSystemMenu(hwnd, false);
                if (hMenu != IntPtr.Zero)
                {
                    EnableMenuItem(hMenu, SC_CLOSE, MF_BYCOMMAND | MF_GRAYED);
                }
            }
            break;
        case WM_CLOSE:
            if (!allowClosing)
            {
                handled = true;
            }
            break;
    }
    return IntPtr.Zero;
}

This code also disables close item in System menu and disallows closing the dialog using Alt+F4.

You will probably want to close the window programmatically. Just calling Close() will not work. Do something like this:

allowClosing = true;
Close();
  • In Windows 7: The above also disables (but does not remove) the Close item in the drop-down System menu. The Close button itself is disable (looks gray), but not removed. This trick does not work for the Minimize/Maximize item/button -- I suspect WPF re-enables them. – user166390 Apr 10 '10 at 20:46
  • 3
    Disabling the button is better than just removing them, it keeps a consistent feel while letting the user know that an important operation is running. – Robert Baker May 8 '11 at 23:47

I was trying Viachaslau's answer since I like the idea of not removing the button but disabling it, but for some reason it did not always work: the close button was still enabled but no errors whatsoever.

This on the other hand always worked (error checking omitted):

[DllImport( "user32.dll" )]
private static extern IntPtr GetSystemMenu( IntPtr hWnd, bool bRevert );
[DllImport( "user32.dll" )]
private static extern bool EnableMenuItem( IntPtr hMenu, uint uIDEnableItem, uint uEnable );

private const uint MF_BYCOMMAND = 0x00000000;
private const uint MF_GRAYED = 0x00000001;
private const uint SC_CLOSE = 0xF060;
private const int WM_SHOWWINDOW = 0x00000018;

protected override void OnSourceInitialized( EventArgs e )
{
  base.OnSourceInitialized( e );
  var hWnd = new WindowInteropHelper( this );
  var sysMenu = GetSystemMenu( hWnd.Handle, false );
  EnableMenuItem( sysMenu, SC_CLOSE, MF_BYCOMMAND | MF_GRAYED );
}
  • 1
    Perfect! Added as a Window extension method in my project. – Matt Davis Jan 19 '14 at 3:14

I just add my implementation of Joe White's answer using Interactivity Behavior (you need to reference System.Windows.Interactivity).

code:

public class HideCloseButtonOnWindow : Behavior<Window>
{
    #region bunch of native methods

    private const int GWL_STYLE = -16;
    private const int WS_SYSMENU = 0x80000;

    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern int GetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex);

    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    private static extern int SetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex, int dwNewLong);

    #endregion

    protected override void OnAttached()
    {
        base.OnAttached();
        AssociatedObject.Loaded += OnLoaded;
    }

    protected override void OnDetaching()
    {
        AssociatedObject.Loaded -= OnLoaded;
        base.OnDetaching();
    }

    private void OnLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var hwnd = new WindowInteropHelper(AssociatedObject).Handle;
        SetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_STYLE, GetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_STYLE) & ~WS_SYSMENU);
    }
}

usage:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication2.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:i="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/2010/interactivity"
        xmlns:w="clr-namespace:WpfApplication2">

    <i:Interaction.Behaviors>
        <w:HideCloseButtonOnWindow />
    </i:Interaction.Behaviors>

</Window>

The property to set is => WindowStyle="None"

<Window x:Class="mdaframework.MainWindow"
            xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
            xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
            Title="Start" Height="350" Width="525" ResizeMode="NoResize"  WindowStartupLocation="CenterScreen" WindowStyle="None">
  • 4
    This also hides the max/min buttons – VoteCoffee May 5 '14 at 14:28
  • 3
    It removes the whole title bar, rendering the box ugly and without a description. Shotgun approach and a duplicate answer. Downvote. – vapcguy Mar 21 '17 at 18:26

Let the user "close" the window but really just hide it.

In the window's OnClosing event, hide the window if already visible:

    If Me.Visibility = Windows.Visibility.Visible Then
        Me.Visibility = Windows.Visibility.Hidden
        e.Cancel = True
    End If

Each time the Background thread is to be executed, re-show background UI window:

    w.Visibility = Windows.Visibility.Visible
    w.Show()

When terminating execution of program, make sure all windows are/can-be closed:

Private Sub CloseAll()
    If w IsNot Nothing Then
        w.Visibility = Windows.Visibility.Collapsed ' Tell OnClosing to really close
        w.Close()
    End If
End Sub

So, pretty much here is your problem. The close button on the upper right of a window frame is not part of the WPF window, but it belongs to the part of the window frame that is controled by your OS. This means you will have to use Win32 interop to do it.

alternativly, you can use the noframe and either provide your own "frame" or have no frame at all.

The following is about disabling the close and Maximize/Minimize buttons, it does not actually remove the buttons (but it does remove the menu items!). The buttons on the title bar are drawn in a disabled/grayed state. (I'm not quite ready to take over all the functionality myself ^^)

This is slightly different than Virgoss solution in that it removes the menu items (and the trailing separator, if needed) instead of just disabling them. It differs from Joe Whites solution as it does not disable the entire system menu and so, in my case, I can keep around the Minimize button and icon.

The follow code also supports disabling the Maximize/Minimize buttons as, unlike the Close button, removing the entries from the menu does not cause the system to render the buttons "disabled" even though removing the menu entries does disable the functionality of the buttons.

It works for me. YMMV.

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Text;

    using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
    using Window = System.Windows.Window;
    using WindowInteropHelper = System.Windows.Interop.WindowInteropHelper;
    using Win32Exception = System.ComponentModel.Win32Exception;

    namespace Channelmatter.Guppy
    {

        public class WindowUtil
        {
            const int MF_BYCOMMAND = 0x0000;
            const int MF_BYPOSITION = 0x0400;

            const uint MFT_SEPARATOR = 0x0800;

            const uint MIIM_FTYPE = 0x0100;

            [DllImport("user32", SetLastError=true)]
            private static extern uint RemoveMenu(IntPtr hMenu, uint nPosition, uint wFlags);

            [DllImport("user32", SetLastError=true)]
            private static extern IntPtr GetSystemMenu(IntPtr hWnd, bool bRevert);

            [DllImport("user32", SetLastError=true)]
            private static extern int GetMenuItemCount(IntPtr hWnd);

            [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
            public struct MenuItemInfo {
                public uint   cbSize;
                public uint   fMask;
                public uint   fType;
                public uint   fState;
                public uint   wID;
                public IntPtr hSubMenu;
                public IntPtr hbmpChecked;
                public IntPtr hbmpUnchecked;
                public IntPtr dwItemData; // ULONG_PTR
                public IntPtr dwTypeData;
                public uint   cch;
                public IntPtr hbmpItem;
            };

            [DllImport("user32", SetLastError=true)]
            private static extern int GetMenuItemInfo(
                IntPtr hMenu, uint uItem,
                bool fByPosition, ref MenuItemInfo itemInfo);

            public enum MenuCommand : uint
            {
                SC_CLOSE = 0xF060,
                SC_MAXIMIZE = 0xF030,
            }

            public static void WithSystemMenu (Window win, Action<IntPtr> action) {
                var interop = new WindowInteropHelper(win);
                IntPtr hMenu = GetSystemMenu(interop.Handle, false);
                if (hMenu == IntPtr.Zero) {
                    throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error(),
                        "Failed to get system menu");
                } else {
                    action(hMenu);
                }
            }

            // Removes the menu item for the specific command.
            // This will disable and gray the Close button and disable the
            // functionality behind the Maximize/Minimuze buttons, but it won't
            // gray out the Maximize/Minimize buttons. It will also not stop
            // the default Alt+F4 behavior.
            public static void RemoveMenuItem (Window win, MenuCommand command) {
                WithSystemMenu(win, (hMenu) => {
                    if (RemoveMenu(hMenu, (uint)command, MF_BYCOMMAND) == 0) {
                        throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error(),
                            "Failed to remove menu item");
                    }
                });
            }

            public static bool RemoveTrailingSeparator (Window win) {
                bool result = false; // Func<...> not in .NET3 :-/
                WithSystemMenu(win, (hMenu) => {
                    result = RemoveTrailingSeparator(hMenu);
                });
                return result;
            }

            // Removes the final trailing separator of a menu if it exists.
            // Returns true if a separator is removed.
            public static bool RemoveTrailingSeparator (IntPtr hMenu) {
                int menuItemCount = GetMenuItemCount(hMenu);
                if (menuItemCount < 0) {
                    throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error(),
                        "Failed to get menu item count");
                }
                if (menuItemCount == 0) {
                    return false;
                } else {
                    uint index = (uint)(menuItemCount - 1);
                    MenuItemInfo itemInfo = new MenuItemInfo {
                        cbSize = (uint)Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(MenuItemInfo)),
                        fMask = MIIM_FTYPE,
                    };

                    if (GetMenuItemInfo(hMenu, index, true, ref itemInfo) == 0) {
                        throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error(),
                            "Failed to get menu item info");
                    }

                    if (itemInfo.fType == MFT_SEPARATOR) {
                        if (RemoveMenu(hMenu, index, MF_BYPOSITION) == 0) {
                            throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error(),
                                "Failed to remove menu item");
                        }
                        return true;
                    } else {
                        return false;
                    }
                }
            }

            private const int GWL_STYLE = -16;

            [Flags]
            public enum WindowStyle : int
            {
                WS_MINIMIZEBOX = 0x00020000,
                WS_MAXIMIZEBOX = 0x00010000,
            }

            // Don't use this version for dealing with pointers
            [DllImport("user32", SetLastError=true)]
            private static extern int SetWindowLong (IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex, int dwNewLong);

            // Don't use this version for dealing with pointers
            [DllImport("user32", SetLastError=true)]
            private static extern int GetWindowLong (IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex);

            public static int AlterWindowStyle (Window win,
                WindowStyle orFlags, WindowStyle andNotFlags) 
            {
                var interop = new WindowInteropHelper(win);

                int prevStyle = GetWindowLong(interop.Handle, GWL_STYLE);
                if (prevStyle == 0) {
                    throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error(),
                        "Failed to get window style");
                }

                int newStyle = (prevStyle | (int)orFlags) & ~((int)andNotFlags);
                if (SetWindowLong(interop.Handle, GWL_STYLE, newStyle) == 0) {
                    throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error(),
                        "Failed to set window style");
                }
                return prevStyle;
            }

            public static int DisableMaximizeButton (Window win) {
                return AlterWindowStyle(win, 0, WindowStyle.WS_MAXIMIZEBOX);
            }
        }
    }

Usage: This must be done AFTER the source is initialized. A good place is to use the SourceInitialized event of the Window:

Window win = ...; /* the Window :-) */
WindowUtil.DisableMaximizeButton(win);
WindowUtil.RemoveMenuItem(win, WindowUtil.MenuCommand.SC_MAXIMIZE);
WindowUtil.RemoveMenuItem(win, WindowUtil.MenuCommand.SC_CLOSE);
while (WindowUtil.RemoveTrailingSeparator(win)) 
{
   //do it here
}

To disable the Alt+F4 functionality the easy method is just to wire up the Canceling event and use set a flag for when you really do want to close the window.

XAML Code

<Button Command="Open" Content="_Open">
    <Button.Style>
        <Style TargetType="Button">
            <Style.Triggers>
                <Trigger Property="IsEnabled" Value="False">
                    <Setter Property="Visibility" Value="Collapsed" />
                </Trigger>
            </Style.Triggers>
        </Style>
     </Button.Style>
</Button>

should work

Edit- for your instant this Thread shows how that can be done but I don't think Window has a property to get what you want without losing the normal title bar.

Edit 2 This Thread shows a way for it to be done, but you must apply your own style to the system menu and it shows a way how you can do that.

  • for some reason "should work" just was displayed, but now updated have occurred – TStamper Apr 13 '09 at 13:53
  • 3
    I'm talking about the Window state though, which is in the title bar. This looks like editing a simple button. – Michael Hedgpeth Apr 13 '09 at 13:56
  • . updated – TStamper Jun 11 '09 at 14:09
  • @TStamper, how do I use your snippet? I am using a global Window style (and template). – Shimmy Jan 3 '10 at 21:45
  • @Shimmy- which one are you referring to? – TStamper Jan 4 '10 at 21:33

goto window properties set

window style = none;

u wont get close buttons...

  • Downvote. It's actually WindowStyle = "None" - watch your syntax. For another, it is a shotgun approach that also removes the title bar, making the box ugly and lacking a title, when there are so many much better ways to handle this (as evidenced by the other answers), and is a duplicate answer. – vapcguy Mar 21 '17 at 18:11

Try adding a Closing event to the window. Add this code to the event handler.

e.Cancel = true;

This will prevent the window from closing. This has the same effect as hiding the close button.

  • 1
    "This has the same effect as hiding the close button." except that the button is still visible and clickable, i.e. it's animated and depresses visually when you click it -- which defies POLA. – rory.ap Dec 20 '16 at 12:21

Use this, modified from https://stephenhaunts.com/2014/09/25/remove-the-close-button-from-a-wpf-window :

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Input;
using System.Windows.Interop;
using System.Windows.Media;

namespace Whatever
{
    public partial class MainMenu : Window
    {
        private const int GWL_STYLE = -16;
        private const int WS_SYSMENU = 0x00080000;

        [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
        private static extern int GetWindowLongPtr(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex);

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        private static extern int SetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex, int dwNewLong);

        public MainMenu()
        {
             InitializeComponent();
             this.Loaded += new RoutedEventHandler(Window_Loaded);
        }

        private void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            var hwnd = new WindowInteropHelper(this).Handle;
            SetWindowLongPtr(hwnd, GWL_STYLE, GetWindowLongPtr(hwnd, GWL_STYLE) & ~WS_SYSMENU);
        }  

    }
}

After much searching for the answer to this, I worked out this simple solution that I will share here in hopes it helps others.

I set WindowStyle=0x10000000.

This sets the WS_VISIBLE (0x10000000) and WS_OVERLAPPED (0x0) values for Window Style. "Overlapped" is the necessary value to show the title bar and window border. By removing the WS_MINIMIZEBOX (0x20000), WS_MAXIMIZEBOX (0x10000), and WS_SYSMENU (0x80000) values from my style value, all the buttons from the title bar were removed, including the Close button.

As stated in other answers, you can use WindowStyle="None" to remove the Title Bar altogether.

And, as stated in the comments to those other answers, this prevents the window from being draggable so it is hard to move it from its initial position.

However, you can overcome this by adding a single line of code to the Constructor in the Window's Code Behind file:

MouseDown += delegate { DragMove(); };

Or, if you prefer Lambda Syntax:

MouseDown += (sender, args) => DragMove();

This makes the entire Window draggable. Any interactive controls present in the Window, such as Buttons, will still work as normal and won't act as drag-handles for the Window.

  • Still a bad idea. It removes the whole title bar, making this a shotgun approach, and makes the box look ugly and means there's no title/description for it. There are much better alternatives. – vapcguy Mar 21 '17 at 18:15
  • @vapcguy It removes the whole title bar. It is a shotgun approach. Makes the box look ugly? Your opinion. Much better alternatives? For you, perhaps. Not for everybody. :-) – Holf Aug 2 '17 at 10:40

Use WindowStyle="SingleBorderWindow" , this will hide max and min button from WPF Window.

  • 1
    does not solve the problem hiding the close button – memory of a dream May 7 '14 at 13:07

If the need is only to prohibit the user from closing the window, this is a simple solution.

XAML code: IsCloseButtonEnabled="False"

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