15

I'm looking for the most terse way to document sections of my page, e.g. div sections.

Anything wrong with using the title attribute, e.g.

<div title="Payment Area" class="form">
   ...
</div>

?

P.S. In case relevant, I'm using the IntelliJ IDE, but new to its various capabilities, e.g. automatic formatting control and other ways to be able to easily understand sections of my pages.

3
  • 9
    If an element has a title attribute, most browsers show a tooltip with the attribute’s value when you hover over it. In this case, they’ll show a “Payment Area” tooltip when you hover anywhere over that div. So, it might not be appropriate.
    – s4y
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:53
  • Cool, thanks Sidnicious. I forgot that. You're right, wouldn't be appropriate.
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 2:04
  • Years late here, but if it's a comment, use a comment. Also, any worthwhile web framework allows for composing views from partials, so make a high level skeleton and name your partials well and more than half of the problem you're having here will solve itself.
    – mlibby
    Commented Jul 25, 2019 at 14:09

5 Answers 5

18

If an element has a title attribute, most browsers show a tooltip with the attribute’s value when you hover over it. In this case, they’ll show a “Payment Area” tooltip when you hover anywhere over that div.

HTML attributes, in general, have a purpose. HTML has comments for documentation! Try them:

<div class="form"> <!-- Payment Area -->
    ...
</div>

You mentioned that you didn't want the overhead of comments. If you count up the characters (including the required space before the attribute, they're actually the same length:

 title="Payment Area"
<!-- Payment Area -->

(But, I agree, they do look bigger!)

5
  • :-) Yah, I wanted to avoid the extra line and find something that describes the div (section) itself -- on same line.
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 2:32
  • I think I'm going to go with using the id, giving it a special naming convention if this element has no special style or javascript associated with it, e.g. id="c__Payment_Area". Then, if it has javascript or css associated with it, I'll change it to id="paymentArea". ... perhaps I should do id="c__paymentArea"
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 2:33
  • 2
    @Ray I agree that comments do feel a little bigger than attributes, but they work just as well on the same line (see edit). If you would rather use an attribute, why not give each element a normal id (like paymentArea), regardless of whether that id is used by CSS or JavaScript?
    – s4y
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 2:38
  • Thanks Sidnicious, I guess with the id they are a little smaller. I think one hold back I've had is using various editor formatters and having them move stuff around in ways I don't like. But outside that, I think Jason's answer and associated comments are good.
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 2:40
  • Alternate idea: Use PHP comments instead of HTML comments - if it has no bearing on how the web page will be affected, users don't need to see it in the source. Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 2:42
4

I would probably use ids, that way you can also use them as hooks for your CSS and JavaScript.

Otherwise, Gabe's Answer makes a good case for data attributes. John Resig explains why they are good here: http://ejohn.org/blog/html-5-data-attributes/

9
  • I don't think I want to imply I'm using this information for anything, other than documenting what a section is for. If I am applying a style or using javascript, then I would use a more condensed description, without spaces, etc. Some of my descriptions are longer.
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:41
  • Sure @Ray. But why not combine the two... save space and time? Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:42
  • Let's say I have 4 divs (sections) that use the same class styling, and other than that do nothing special. To me if I use the id attribute, with a more variable like name, I'm implying functionality / complexity. I don't want to do that. I'd use a comment to document, but this way seems more succinct to me.
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:45
  • Ok. But if you give them an id with a functional name, like id="payment_area", then 1. you have documented the div and 2. made your code future friendly in case you want to add functionality or specific styles. Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:49
  • 1
    I see what you're saying, but this then makes me wonder if there is a style for payment_area somewhere, or perhaps it's being used by javascript. I'm an css/html "newbie", but doesn't sectioning things like this also imply additional complexity? Perhaps I could use one or the other depending on whether there really is additional "id-specific" functionality for this div?
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:56
4

I would recommend using the HTML5 custom attributes standard:

<div data-title='Payment Area'></div>

Basically, precede the name with data- and the browser will ignore it.

4
  • Ok .. that's less terse though. Is there an advantage?
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:32
  • Well, if you don't want to use the id attribute, then it's just the standard I follow, since HTML5 is showing up more and more. Just trying to follow recommended practices.
    – Gabe
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:37
  • Gabe, if I used something like "data-c", c is for comment, how will older browsers treat this?
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:53
  • 2
    Pretty sure it would just ignore it.
    – Gabe
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:54
1

The title attribute isn't meant for divs - I haven't checked the official specs, but I don't think it's even a supported attribute. The better practice is to use the "id" attribute. This has the added benefit of providing hooks for your CSS.

You can also take it a step further and use html5, which provides you with more descriptive elements such as <nav>, <section>, <article> and <header>


Edit: as per comment by steveax, the title attribute isn't invalid. I think the gist of my answer remains valid, though.

5
  • I don't think I want to imply I'm using this information for anything, other than documenting what a section is for. Do you know how the aforementioned html5 elements degrade in browsers (or browser versions) not yet supporting html5?
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:38
  • I personally find the ID useful for my own organization - the css is an added benefit. As for html5, you can make IE handle them easily - in the <head> of your page, using conditional comments, simply use javascript to create the appropriate element - you don't even need to insert it into the DOM. Then you can style it as if it were a <div>, or anything. Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:40
  • Follow up on last comment: example: document.createElement('article'); Now IE won't freak out. Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:41
  • Title attribute is fine on a div, but it's for users not authors. Misusing @title for author documentation is a bad practice. Why not just use comments?
    – steveax
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:41
  • Thanks steveax. Yah, I don't want the user to see tooltips. I wanted something more succinct than comments -- e.g. not a separate line, not extra < >. It looks like perhaps my solution is to use something like <div data-c="Bla bla bla">, as long as older non-html5 browsers don't get bothered, which I don't know ??
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:51
-1

You can use the rel="" attribute, that works pretty well for me, I don't think title works on divs

<div rel="Payment Area"></div>
6
  • hmm, thanks. Any "collision" with other uses of this attribute? Wait a minute, isn't this attribute just for links?
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 1:58
  • 4
    No, please do not invent @rel types. That is not a valid use of @rel
    – steveax
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 2:01
  • @steveax - you probably didn't see this comment, semi-hidden in the previous answer: Yah, I don't want the user to see tooltips. I wanted something more succinct than comments -- e.g. not a separate line, not extra < >. It looks like perhaps my solution is to use something like <div data-c="Bla bla bla">, as long as older non-html5 browsers don't get bothered, which I don't know ??
    – Ray
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 2:03
  • Why don't you try it, I have used it before and it worked perfectly in my situation, I was able to refer to it using JQuery, don't listen to steveax :)
    – Reina
    Commented Sep 16, 2011 at 3:32
  • 3
    @Reina I think steveax is totally right, because you are using an attribute which are not supposed to be used like this, so the code becomes semantically incorrect. Be aware that if something works doesn't mean it's good. And you shouldn't get angry when someones criticizes your answer constructively.
    – Oriol
    Commented Sep 29, 2013 at 0:32

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