3

With the given type signature below, is there a way to do something similar to below?

func Transform[T, U any](item T) U {
    return item
}

The code above gives the following error:

cannot use item (variable of type T constrained by any) as U value in return 
statement

I am unable to use the type signature above, as I am essentially trying to make an optional transform method that sometimes will need to convert from T to U, but sometimes just return itself. A more detailed example of the use case is shown below.

type SomeStruct[T, U any] struct {
    Transform func(T) U
}

func (s SomeStruct[T, U]) Transform(elem T) (U) {
    if s.Transform != nil {
        return s.Transform(elem)
    }
    return elem
}

Is there a way to create a Transform function that sometimes conditionally just returns itself?

2
  • 2
    No, you cannot create a function that has varying return types (or argument types, for that matter). You can have it return an interface type, but that's about it.
    – Peter
    Nov 11, 2022 at 0:10
  • I'm trying to write code that accepts a transform function, but the transform function is optional. In the case that it's not provided, I want to be able to use the original value T, but was running into issues where the compiler requires me to convert it into a U
    – nimda
    Nov 12, 2022 at 6:28

2 Answers 2

3

You can make your code snippet work:

func Transform[T, U any](item T) U {
    return any(item).(U)
}

But the code will fail with a panic if U is not assertion-compatible with the actual type of item:

This will panic:

fmt.Println(Transform[string, int]("foo"))

// Output: panic: interface conversion: interface {} is string, not int

This succeeds without panic, because bytes.Buffer is implements both the io.Reader and io.Writer interface:

b := &bytes.Buffer{}
_ = Transform[io.Writer, io.Reader](b)

So, it's possible to do what you want. But I'm not sure how useful it is, as fails at runtime of the actual argument isn't compatible with U.

1
  • This combined with some reflection solved my use case. The reflection is used to catch the panic case and return an error instead.
    – nimda
    Nov 16, 2022 at 23:12
1

You can't return T if your function is defined to return U. Even if you assert T to U, the function is still returning U.

If you really want to return exactly either T or U, you need to declare the return type as any:

func (s SomeStruct[T, U]) Transform(elem T) any { /* ... */ }

...which gives up static typing; or you could use a helper "either" type:

type Either[T, U any] struct {
    value any
}

// Either methods

func (s SomeStruct[T, U]) Transform(elem T) Either[T, U] {
    if s.transform == nil {
        return Either[T, U]{elem}
    }
    return Either[T, U]{s.transform(elem)}
}

See how to use it in this playground.


Alternatives will deviate from your stated goal. One is to actually assert T to U, though you must be aware that this returns U, not T, even if T's value is assignable to U:

func (s SomeStruct[T, U]) Transform(elem T) U {
    if s.transform == nil {
        if u, ok := any(elem).(U); ok {
            return u
        }
        return *new(U) // U's zero value if elem assertion fails
    }
    return s.transform(elem)
}

You must use an assertion because both type parameters T and U are constrained by any, so there's (rightfully) no other way to express convertibility between the two. The comma-ok idiom helps avoid run-time panics.

Or you can return (U, error) instead, which is, generally, the reasonable thing to do:

func (s SomeStruct[T, U]) Transform(elem T) (u U, err error) {
    if s.transform == nil {
        err = errors.New("transform function not set")
        return 
    }
    u = s.transform(elem)
    return
}

Playground: https://go.dev/play/p/GKLRmKKWxlP

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.