39

I may miss some sort of point here, if that's the case - please include that discussion as a part of my question :).

This is a shortened down and renamed sample of a working code. The GetTicks(…) is a single sample, which could be any sort of functionality (value of > 0 < 9 should return a specific Enum a.so).

public static class Something
{
    public enum TypeOf : short
    {
        Minute = 2, Hour = 3, Day = 4, …
    }

    public static long GetTicks(Something.TypeOf someEnum)
    {
        long ticks = 0;
        switch (someEnum)
        {
            case Something.TypeOf.Minute:
                ticks = TimeSpan.TicksPerMinute;
                break;
            case Something.TypeOf.Hour:
                ticks = TimeSpan.TicksPerHour;
                break;
         ....
        }
        return ticks;
    }
}

// This class is called from anywhere in the system.
public static void SomeMethod(string dodo, object o, Something.TypeOf period)
{
    // With the design above
    long ticks = Something.GetTicks(period);

    // Traditional, if there was a simple enum
    if (period == Something.Day)
        ticks = TimeSpan.FromDays(1).Ticks;
    else if (period == Something.Hour)
        ticks = TimeSpan.FromHours(1).Ticks;
}

The idea is to collect functionality that concerns an enum, near as possible to the enum itself. The enum is the reason function. Also, I find it easy and natural to look for such functionality near the enum. Also, it's easy to modify or extend.

The drawback I have is that I have to state the enum more explicit, like Something.TypeOf. The design may look non-standard? And would it apply, if the enum was for internal use in the class.

How would you do this more nicely? I tried abstract, base inheritance, partial. None of them seem to apply.

32

C# enums don't work well like this. However, you can implement your own "fixed set of values" fairly easily:

public sealed class Foo
{
    public static readonly Foo FirstValue = new Foo(...);
    public static readonly Foo SecondValue = new Foo(...);

    private Foo(...)
    {
    }

    // Add methods here
}

As it happens, one example I've got of this is remarkably similar to yours - DateTimeFieldType in Noda Time. Sometimes you might even want to make the class unsealed, but keep the private constructor - which allows you to create subclasses only as nested classes. Very handy for restricting inheritance.

The downside is that you can't use switch :(

  • Fully indeed, ramarkably alike! I like your approach and will dig into it later when I can aware time for optimize and understand it's benefits (if some) ;)). – Independent Sep 21 '11 at 16:44
  • Yeah, Java-like enums. Though I'd recommend using a structure, not a class. And a Value field for fast comparing and the switch statement. – IllidanS4 wants Monica back Nov 2 '14 at 18:42
  • 1
    @Andrei: True. I'd probably write a unit test to verify it with reflection :) – Jon Skeet Jun 19 '15 at 16:08
  • 1
    Why would one use this accepted answer's approach over providing extension methods to the Enum class? I am just wondering for my own knowledge. It seems to offer the exact same functionality. – Rich Episcopo Feb 14 '17 at 17:06
  • 1
    @RichieEpiscopo: With the enum, you'd still only have that single value. So implementing those extension methods may well be a pain; you can't use any of the normal OO techniques, or have any state etc. – Jon Skeet Feb 14 '17 at 18:12
73

If you don't mind a little more writing you can make extension methods to expand the interface of the enum.

e.g.

public enum TimeUnit
{
   Second,
   Minute,
   Hour,
   Day,
   Year,
   /* etc */
}
public static class TimeUnitExtensions
{
    public static long InTicks(this TimeUnit myUnit)
    {
         switch(myUnit)
         {
           case TimeUnit.Second:
               return TimeSpan.TicksPerSecond;
           case TimeUnit.Minute:
               return TimeSpan.TicksPerMinute;
            /* etc */
         }
    }
}

This can add "instance" methods to your enums. It's a bit more verbose than mostly liked, though.

Remember though that an enum should be treated mostly as a named value.

  • How do you tie TimeUnitExtensions to TimeUnit and the TimeSpan instance for which you want the ticks? I may be missing some context and no doubt my lack of C# knowledge isn't helping. – David Harkness Dec 16 '13 at 7:39
  • 2
    @DavidHarkness, it's because of the "this" in this line: public static long InTicks(this TimeUnit myUnit). The "this" associate TimeUnit to extension. – alansiqueira27 Feb 14 '14 at 16:12
  • I like Jon's answer, but this is a possibility as well. +1, I hadn't considered Extension methods for this! – Joel Mar 5 '14 at 16:41
  • This one combines the fastness of enums with the elegance of extension methods. Too bad there aren't extension properties. ☹ – IllidanS4 wants Monica back Nov 2 '14 at 18:44

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