12

I'm using the .NET 3.0 class System.Security.Cryptography.MACTripleDES class to generate a MAC value. Unfortunately, I am working with a hardware device that uses "1111111111111111" (as hex) as a single-length DES key. The System.Security.Cryptography library does some sanity checking on the key and returns a Exception if you try to use a cryptographically weak key.

For example:

byte[] key = new byte[24];
for (int i = 0; i < key.Length; i++)
  key[i] = 0x11;

byte[] data = new byte[] { 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00 };
byte[] computedMac = null;
using (MACTripleDES mac = new MACTripleDES(key))
{
  computedMac = mac.ComputeHash(data);
}

throws an exception

System.Security.Cryptography.CryptographicException : Specified key is a known weak key for 'TripleDES' and cannot be used.

I know this is not a secure key. In production, the device will be flashed with a new, secure key. In the mean time, is there any way to inhibit this Exception from being thrown? Perhaps an app.config or registry setting?

Edit: The key would actually be 101010... due to the algorithm forcing odd parity. I'm not sure if this is universal to the DES algorithm or just a requirement in the payment processing work I do.

Edit 2: Daniel's answer below has some very good information about hacking .NET. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to solve my problem using this technique, but there is still some interesting reading there.

  • (Re: your edit) DES and 3DES only uses the top 7 bits of each byte in the key. The least significant bit is usually used as a parity bit. – Rasmus Faber Apr 14 '09 at 19:16
  • I would home so. It seems odd that something like this would be enforced at the library level. People using encryption should know to use hard to guess keys, and the library shouldn't be enforcing these things. – Kibbee Apr 15 '09 at 12:32
  • 1
    @Kibbee, A weak key in this context does not mean "hard to guess". It means a key for which the specified algorithm exhibits some degenerate behaviour that weakens it. – caf Jul 30 '09 at 0:59
  • About the parity: The last bit of each byte is not actually used by the algorithm, so it doesn't really matter. It is common to use it as a parity bit, but that could every implementation do as it wants. – Paŭlo Ebermann Nov 29 '11 at 21:38
1

Instead of using MACTripleDES with the DES key repeated to fake a single DES CBC-MAC, you could just implement CBC-MAC yourself on top of DESCryptoServiceProvider.

<1111111111111111> is not a weak DES key.

This will calculate a DES CBC-MAC:

public static byte[] CalcDesMac(byte[] key, byte[] data){
        DESCryptoServiceProvider des = new DESCryptoServiceProvider();
        des.Key = key;
        des.IV = new byte[8];
        des.Padding = PaddingMode.Zeros;
        MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
        using(CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, des.CreateEncryptor(), CryptoStreamMode.Write)){
          cs.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
        }
        byte[] encryption = ms.ToArray();
        byte[] mac = new byte[8];
        Array.Copy(encryption, encryption.Length-8, mac, 0, 8);
        PrintByteArray(encryption);
        return mac;
    }
  • This works just fine. I think I was just focused on the MACTripleDES class, which if I'd thought it through, is really used for Triple DES only and not single DES. I wish it hadn't taken me a year for me to read your response! I'd ended up implementing CBC-MAC by hand. – David Chappelle Mar 25 '10 at 22:20
6

I wouldn't really recommend it, but you should be able to modify the IL-code that checks for weak keys using Reflector and the Add-in ReflexIL

edit:

Sorry, it took a while for me to load all of it up in my Virtual Machine (running Ubuntu) and didn't want to mess with Mono.

  • Install the ReflexIL Add-in: View -> Add-ins -> Add
  • Open ReflexIL: Tools -> ReflexIL v0.9
  • Find the IsWeakKey() function. (You can use Search: F3)
  • Two functions will come up, doubleclick the one found in System.Security.Cryptography.TripleDES
  • ReflexIL should have come up too. In the Instructions tab, scroll all the way down to line 29 (offset 63).
  • Change ldc.i4.1 to ldc.i4.0, this means the function will always return false.

In your assemblies pane (left one), you can now scroll up and click on "Common Language Runtime Library", the ReflexIL pane will give you an option to save it.

Important notes:

  • BACK UP your original assembly first! (mscorlib.dll)
  • mscorlib.dll is a signed assembly and you will need the .NET SDK (sn.exe tool) for ReflexIL to make it skip verification. I just checked this myself, you should already have this with Visual C# installed. Just click "Register it for verification skipping (on this computer)" when asked to.
  • I don't think I have to tell you to only use this on your development machine :)

Good luck! If you need additional instructions, please feel free to use the commentbox.

edit2:

I'm confused!

http://i44.tinypic.com/2r6fwbo_th.png

I completely removed the IsWeakKey check from the set_Key function in the mscorlib assembly. I am absolutely certain that I modified the correct function, and that I did it correctly. Reflector's disassembler does no longer show the check. The funny thing is however, that Visual C# still throws the same exception.

This leads me to believe that mscorlib must somehow still be cached somewhere. However, renaming mscorlib.dll to mscorlib.dll_ leads MSVC# to crash, so it must still be dependent on the original dll.

This is quite interesting stuff, but I think I've reached the point where I have no clue what is going on, it just doesn't make any sense! See attached image. :(

edit3:

I notice in Olly, that unlike assemblies such as mscoree, mscorsec and mscorwks; mscorlib.dll isn't actually located in: c:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\

But instead, in what appears to be a non-existent location: C:\WINDOWS\assembly\NativeImages_v2.0.50727_32\mscorlib\6d667f19d687361886990f3ca0f49816\mscorlib.ni.dll

I think I am missing something here :) Will investigate this some more.

edit4:

Even after having patched out EVERYTHING in IsWeakKey, and played around with both removing and generating new native images (x.ni.dll) of mscorlib.dll using "ngen.exe", I am getting the same exception. I must be noted that even after uninstalling the native mscorlib images, it is still using mscorlib.ni.dll... Meh.

I give up. I hope someone will be able to answer what the hell is going on because I sure don't know. :)

  • Pretty interesting solution! I patched my mscorlib.dll, but there's no change in the behavior of the function. Is this dll cached somewhere? All I am changing is ....\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50737\mscorlib.dll. – David Chappelle Apr 13 '09 at 18:59
  • I just tested the code, you're right. I will investigate and report back :) – Daniel Sloof Apr 13 '09 at 19:04
  • This is weird to say the least. I have now modified the actual IsWeakKey check on set_Key(), and it is doing the same thing. It must be cached somewhere. I shall investigate some more :) – Daniel Sloof Apr 13 '09 at 19:24
  • I am not familiar with this portion of .NET internals. I thought C:\WINDOWS\assembly was where assemblies in the GAC lived. Using Process Explorer, I see that my app has an open handle to mscorlib.ni.dll. There is an old blog entry at blogs.msdn.com/junfeng/archive/2004/11/11/256122.aspx.. – David Chappelle Apr 13 '09 at 20:37
  • Yeah. It is using a native image of mscorlib.dll which can be generated using the ngen.exe tool (ngen.exe install mscorlib.dll). First time you run it it'll tell you the native image is already up-to-date. (which it isn't). Even when you remove the native image it will load mscorlib.ni.dll. – Daniel Sloof Apr 13 '09 at 20:44
4

I found out what you need to do. Fortunately there is a method that available that creates the ICryptoTranforms that doesn't check for weak keys. You also need to watch out for the base class as it also does sanity checks. Via reflection simply call out the _NewEncryptor method (you need to do a little more reflection, but that's the idea).

Luckily the MACTripleDES has a field of type TripleDES, so derive from MACTripleDES and replace it via reflection in the constructors. I have done all the work for you.

I can't verify that the correct MAC is generated, but no exceptions are thrown. Furthermore, you might want to doc comment the code and do exception handling (reflection failures - e.g. if the fields/methods are not there) - but this is SO; so I didn't bother.

using System;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Security.Cryptography;
using System.IO;

namespace DesHack
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            byte[] key = new byte[24];
            for (int i = 0; i < key.Length; i++)
                key[i] = 0x11;

            byte[] data = new byte[] { 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00 };
            byte[] computedMac = null;
            using (MACTripleDES mac = new MACTripleDESHack(key))
            {
                computedMac = mac.ComputeHash(data);
            }
        }
    }

    class MACTripleDESHack : MACTripleDES
    {
        TripleDES _desHack = new DesHack();

        static FieldInfo _cspField = typeof(MACTripleDES).GetField("des", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);

        public MACTripleDESHack()
            : base()
        {
            RewireDes();
        }

        public MACTripleDESHack(byte[] rgbKey)
            : base(rgbKey)
        {
            RewireDes();
        }

        private void RewireDes()
        {
            _cspField.SetValue(this, _desHack);
        }

    }

    class DesHack : TripleDES
    {
        TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider _backing = new TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider();

        static MethodInfo _newEncryptor;
        static object _encrypt;
        static object _decrypt;

        public override int BlockSize
        {
            get
            {
                return _backing.BlockSize;
            }
            set
            {
                _backing.BlockSize = value;
            }
        }

        public override int FeedbackSize
        {
            get
            {
                return _backing.FeedbackSize;
            }
            set
            {
                _backing.FeedbackSize = value;
            }
        }

        // For these two we ALSO need to avoid
        // the base class - it also checks
        // for weak keys.
        private byte[] _iv;
        public override byte[] IV
        {
            get
            {
                return _iv;
            }
            set
            {
                _iv = value;
            }
        }

        private byte[] _key;
        public override byte[] Key
        {
            get
            {
                return _key;
            }
            set
            {
                _key = value;
            }
        }

        public override int KeySize
        {
            get
            {
                return _backing.KeySize;
            }
            set
            {
                _backing.KeySize = value;
            }
        }

        public override KeySizes[] LegalBlockSizes
        {
            get
            {
                return _backing.LegalBlockSizes;
            }
        }

        public override KeySizes[] LegalKeySizes
        {
            get
            {
                return _backing.LegalKeySizes;
            }
        }

        public override CipherMode Mode
        {
            get
            {
                return _backing.Mode;
            }
            set
            {
                _backing.Mode = value;
            }
        }

        public override PaddingMode Padding
        {
            get
            {
                return _backing.Padding;
            }
            set
            {
                _backing.Padding = value;
            }
        }


        static DesHack()
        {
            _encrypt = typeof(object).Assembly.GetType("System.Security.Cryptography.CryptoAPITransformMode").GetField("Encrypt").GetValue(null);
            _decrypt = typeof(object).Assembly.GetType("System.Security.Cryptography.CryptoAPITransformMode").GetField("Decrypt").GetValue(null);
            _newEncryptor = typeof(TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider).GetMethod("_NewEncryptor", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
        }

        public DesHack()
        {            
        }

        public override ICryptoTransform CreateDecryptor()
        {
            return CreateDecryptor(_key, _iv);
        }

        public override ICryptoTransform CreateEncryptor()
        {
            return CreateEncryptor(_key, _iv);
        }

        public override ICryptoTransform CreateDecryptor(byte[] rgbKey, byte[] rgbIV)
        {
            // return this._NewEncryptor(rgbKey, base.ModeValue, rgbIV, base.FeedbackSizeValue, CryptoAPITransformMode.Decrypt);
            return (ICryptoTransform) _newEncryptor.Invoke(_backing,
                new object[] { rgbKey, ModeValue, rgbIV, FeedbackSizeValue, _decrypt });
        }

        public override ICryptoTransform CreateEncryptor(byte[] rgbKey, byte[] rgbIV)
        {
            // return this._NewEncryptor(rgbKey, base.ModeValue, rgbIV, base.FeedbackSizeValue, CryptoAPITransformMode.Encrypt);
            return (ICryptoTransform) _newEncryptor.Invoke(_backing,
                new object[] { rgbKey, ModeValue, rgbIV, FeedbackSizeValue, _encrypt });
        }

        public override void GenerateIV()
        {
            _backing.GenerateIV();
        }

        public override void GenerateKey()
        {
            _backing.GenerateKey();
        }

        protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (disposing)
                ((IDisposable) _backing).Dispose();
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }
    }
}
1

Unfortunately, the behaviour can't be overridden.

1

There is a great suggestion using reflection in the MSDN forums

0

I'm not a security expert but wouldn't XORing your key with another value be enough to satisfy the sanity check? You could do this for your debug version (with proper IFDEF) so you can do proper checking and remove it for your release or production version where the key would be strong enough.

  • That would indeed satisfy the sanity check, but the hardware device he is working with would still be using the original key. – Daniel Sloof Apr 13 '09 at 18:51
  • Yeah. I just thought of that. I was only thinking about it from the code point of view and didn't even consider the hardware. My Bad :) – Robert Kozak Apr 13 '09 at 18:57
-1

The reflection based solutions get you around the problem, but they are dirty and evil. Nobody has yet mentioned a very useful method: TripleDES.IsWeakKey

I have had this problem and solved it with a very simple utility that I use immediately before I set the Key on my CryptoServiceProvider:

private void MakeSecureKey(byte[] key)
{
    while(TripleDES.IsWeakKey(key))
    {
        var sha = SHA256Managed.Create().ComputeHash(key);
        Array.Copy(sha,key,key.Length);
    }
}

If you call it anytime you make an encryptor or decryptor, it should prevent the crash and always give you a secure key.

  • This does not really help if one has to interoperate with a device which requires a specific key. – Paŭlo Ebermann Nov 29 '11 at 21:40
  • Fair enough. Just thought I'd add it here since its the number one google hit for that error, and it might be useful to somebody in a slightly different situation. – captncraig Nov 29 '11 at 21:59
-1

Quite simple (After looking at the code from GitHub)

static bool TripleDES.IsWeakKey(Byte[] rgbKey)

Since it is static - it is easy to test your key against it

  1. Size must be either 16 or 24 bytes (???) Why can't they put it in the documentation
  2. The code check for few simple repetitions Just create random enuogh values

See code at: https://github.com/mono/mono/blob/master/mcs/class/corlib/System.Security.Cryptography/TripleDES.cs

Dekel

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