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I understand that a header HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR is set by proxy servers to identify the ip-address of the host that is making the HTTP request through the proxy. I've heard claims that the header HTTP_CLIENT_IP is set for similar purposes.

  1. What is the difference between HTTP_CLIENT_IP and HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR?
  2. Why would one have different values than the other?
  3. Where can I find resources on the exact definition of these headers.
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Neither of these headers are officially standardised. Therefore:

  1. What is the difference between HTTP_CLIENT_IP and HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR? - it is impossible to say. Different proxies may implement these, or may not. The implementations may vary from one proxy to the next, and they may not. A lack of a standard breeds question marks.
  2. Why would one have different values than the other? - See point 1. However, from a purely practical point of view, the only reason I can see for these having different values is if more than one proxy was involved - the X-Forwarded-For: header might then contain a complete track of the forwarding chain, whereas the Client-IP: header would contain the actual client IP. This is pure speculation, however.
  3. Where can I find resources on the exact definition of these headers. - You can't. See point 1.

There does seem to be some kind of de-facto standard regarding the X-Forwarded-For: header, but given that there is no RFC that defines it this cannot be relied upon see comment below.

As a side note, the Client-IP: header should by convention be X-Client-IP: since it is a 'user-defined' header.

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