132

One of the commands I find incredibly useful in Git is git add -u to throw everything but untracked files into the index. Is there an inverse of that? In the last few months, I've often found myself in a position where I've interactively added some updates to the index and I want to add all of the untracked files to that index before I commit.

Is there a way to add only the untracked files to the index without identifying them individually? I don't see anything obvious in the help docs, but maybe I'm missing it?

Thanks.

  • 1
    Regarding "throw everything but untracked files into the index", .gitignore is specifically engineered for that purpose, not git add -u. – Pacerier Oct 20 '15 at 10:17
  • Also, are you asking to add the untracked files while removing all the currently tracked ones, or are you asking to add the untracked files on top of the currently tracked ones (making everything tracked)? – Pacerier Oct 20 '15 at 10:20
195

It's easy with git add -i. Type a (for "add untracked"), then * (for "all"), then q (to quit) and you're done.

To do it with a single command: echo -e "a\n*\nq\n"|git add -i

  • 3
    I was hoping there was something less, well, interactive, but it's certainly better than file by file. :-) – Rob Wilkerson Sep 16 '11 at 15:11
  • 32
    echo -e "a\n*\nq\n"|git add -i – Mat Sep 16 '11 at 15:14
  • 1
    @Mat I came for this complete automation like in above comment. Thank you. – Muthu Ganapathy Nathan Nov 30 '13 at 10:54
  • 1
    Must-see thread: stackoverflow.com/q/572549/632951 – Pacerier Oct 20 '15 at 10:25
  • @Mat thank you so is the complete command ----> git add -i a * q ?? – BKSpurgeon Jun 22 '16 at 6:00
29

git ls-files -o --exclude-standard gives untracked files, so you can do something like below ( or add an alias to it):

git add $(git ls-files -o --exclude-standard)
  • 1
    alias gau="git ls-files -o --exclude-standard | xargs -i git add '{}'" works for me – Stephan Apr 4 '12 at 13:14
  • git ls-files --help is quite a useful read: -o, --others Show other (i.e. untracked) files in the output – Joshua Kunzmann May 5 '12 at 5:17
10

You can add this to your ~/.gitconfig file:

[alias]
    add-untracked = !"git status --porcelain | awk '/\\?\\?/{ print $2 }' | xargs git add"

Then, from the commandline, just run:

git add-untracked
  • I like this approach, but it doesn't handle spaces in filenames. – Paul Coccoli Aug 16 '16 at 17:53
10

Not exactly what you're looking for, but I've found this quite helpful:

git add -AN

Will add all files to the index, but without their content. Files that were untracked now behave as if they were tracked. Their content will be displayed in git diff, and you can add then interactively with git add -p.

9

People have suggested piping the output of git ls-files to git add but this is going to fail in cases where there are filenames containing white space or glob characters such as *.

The safe way would be to use:

git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z | xargs -0 git add

where -z tells git to use \0 line terminators and -0 tells xargs the same. The only disadvantage of this approach is that the -0 option is non-standard, so only some versions of xargs support it.

4

git ls-files lists the files in the current directory. If you want to list untracked files from anywhere in the tree, this might work better:

git ls-files -o --exclude-standard $(git rev-parse --show-toplevel)

To add all untracked files in the tree:

git ls-files -o --exclude-standard $(git rev-parse --show-toplevel) | xargs git add
  • Dunno why this was the only thing to work, but it was, thanks – slackbot39243 Jun 7 '15 at 15:04
2

I tried this and it worked :

git stash && git add . && git stash pop

git stash will only put all modified tracked files into separate stack, then left over files are untracked files. Then by doing git add . will stage all files untracked files, as required. Eventually, to get set of all modified files from stack by git stash pop

0

If you have thousands of untracked files (ugh, don't ask) then git add -i will not work when adding *. You will get an error stating Argument list too long.

If you then also are on Windows (don't ask #2 :-) and need to use PowerShell for adding all untracked files, you can use this command:

git ls-files -o --exclude-standard | select | foreach { git add $_ }
  • A more condensed version: git ls-files -o --exclude-standard | % { git add $_ } – marckassay Dec 29 '18 at 15:56
-3

To add all untracked files git command is

git add -A

Also if you want to get more details about various available options , you can type command

git add -i

instead of first command , with this you will get more options including option to add all untracked files as shown below :

$ git add -i warning: LF will be replaced by CRLF in README.txt. The file will have its original line endings in your working directory. warning: LF will be replaced by CRLF in package.json.

* Commands * 1: status 2: update 3: revert 4: add untracked 5: patch 6: diff 7: quit 8: help What now> a

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