0

I am trying to use SimpleInjector in a WPF Application (.NET Framework). We use it in exactly the same way in many of our Services but for some reason when I am attempting to implement the same logic in this WPF Application, the call to the HttpClient().GetAsync is hanging. We think it is because for some reason the Task is not executing.

I am registering the objects from the OnStartUp element of App.xaml.cs as below. Inside the SetupService Constructor we call a SetupService URL (set in the SetupConfiguration Section of the App.Config) to get the SetupResponse to use in the app.

It is ultimately hanging in the ServiceClient.GetAsync method, I have tried to show the flow below:

All classes appear to have been injected correctly, and the ServiceClient is populated in exactly the same way as the same point in one of our working services. We're at a loss as to what is happening, and how to fix this.

Finally, SetupService is being injected in other Classes - so I would rather get it working like this, rather than remove the call from the SimpleInjector mechanism.

Any help is very much appreciated.


public partial class App : Application
    {
        private static readonly Container _container = new Container();

        protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e)
        {
            base.OnStartup(e);
            RegisterDependencies();
            _container.Verify();

        }

        private void RegisterDependencies()
        {
            var serviceConfigSection = ServiceConfigurationSection.Get();
            
            _container.RegisterSingle<ILoggingProvider, LoggingProvider>();
            _container.RegisterSingle<IServiceClient>(() => new ServiceClient(_container.GetInstance<ILoggingProvider>()));
            _container.RegisterSingle<IConfigurationSection>(() => SetupConfigurationSection.Get());
            _container.RegisterSingle<ISetupService, SetupService>();

       }
}
   public class SetupService: ISetupService
    {
        private static readonly Dictionary<string, string> AcceptType = new Dictionary<string, string>
        {
            {"Accept", "application/xml"}
        };
        private const string AuthenticationType = "Basic";

        private readonly IServiceClient _serviceClient;
        private readonly ILoggingProvider _logger;
        private readonly IConfigurationSection _configuration;


        public SetupService(IConfigurationSection configuration, IServiceClient serviceClient, ILoggingProvider logger)
        {
            _serviceClient = serviceClient;
            _logger = logger;
            _configuration = kmsConfiguration;

            RefreshSetup();
        }

        public void RefreshSetup()
        {
            try
            {
                var token = BuildIdentityToken();

                var authHeaderClear = string.Format("IDENTITY_TOKEN:{0}", token);

                var authenticationHeaderValue =
                    new AuthenticationHeaderValue(AuthenticationType, Convert.ToBase64String(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(authHeaderClear)));

                _serviceClient.Url = _configuration.Url;
                var httpResponse = _serviceClient.GetAsync(string.Empty, authenticationHeaderValue, AcceptType).Result;

                var responseString = httpResponse.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result;

                _response = responseString.FromXML<SetupResponse>();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                throw
            }
        }
    public class ServiceClient : IServiceClient
    {
        private const string ContentType = "application/json";
        private string _userAgent;

        private ILoggingProvider _logger;

        public string Url { get; set; }
        public string ProxyAddress { get; set; }
        public int TimeoutForRequestAndResponseMs { get; set; }
        public int HttpCode { get; private set; }

        public ServiceClient(ILoggingProvider logger = null)
        {
            _logger = logger;
        }


        public async Task<HttpResponseMessage> GetAsync(string endpoint, AuthenticationHeaderValue authenticationHeaderValue = null, IDictionary<string, string> additionalData = null, IDictionary<string, string> additionalParams = null)
        {
            using (var client = new HttpClient())
            {
                client.BaseAddress = new Uri(Url);
                ServicePointManager.SecurityProtocol = SecurityProtocolType.Tls12;
                client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Add(new MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue(ContentType));
                if (authenticationHeaderValue != null)
                    client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Authorization = authenticationHeaderValue;
                ProcessHeader(client.DefaultRequestHeaders, additionalData);
                var paramsQueryString = ProcessParams(additionalParams);
                if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(paramsQueryString))
                    endpoint = $"{endpoint}?{paramsQueryString}";
                
                return await client.GetAsync(endpoint); **// HANGS ON THIS LINE!**

            }
        }
    }
}
2
  • 1
    Why do you think SimpleInjector has anything to do with it? Why do you think it's because the task is not starting? Most probably it's because you're blocking the UI thread with those .Result invocations. Commented Nov 23, 2022 at 19:27
  • Honestly, I don't, I had read there are issues with SimpleInjector and WPF, so I included it in the description. It's going to be tricky to remove those .Result commands - as it is in production code that is working ok in other environments. But at least I have a direction to go in, thanks for your comments :) Commented Nov 24, 2022 at 9:22

2 Answers 2

3

If you block on asynchronous code from a UI thread, then you can expect deadlocks. I explain this fully on my blog. In this case, the cause of the deadlock is Result. There's a couple of solutions.

The one I recommend is to rethink your user experience. Your UI shouldn't be blocking on an HTTP call to complete before it shows anything; instead, immediately (and synchronously) display a UI (i.e., some "loading..." screen), and then update that UI when the HTTP call completes.

The other is to block during startup. There's a few patterns for this. None of them work in all situations, but one that usually works is to wrap the asynchronous work in Task.Run and then block on that, e.g., var httpResponse = Task.Run(() => _serviceClient.GetAsync(string.Empty, authenticationHeaderValue, AcceptType)).GetAwaiter().GetResult(); and similar for other blocking calls.

Blocking before showing a UI is generally considered a bad UX. App stores generally disallow it. So that's why I recommend changing the UX. You may find an approach like this helpful.

0

Thanks for your Responses, I just wanted to sync the solution I've gone for. It was risky for me to change the code in SetupService to remove the .Result, even though this was probably the correct solution, as I did not want to affect the other working Services using the SetupService library already there.

I ended up moving the regsitrations off the UI Thread by embedding the SimpleInjector code in a Code library, Creating a Program.cs and Main() and setting that as my Entry point.

static class Program
    {
        public static readonly Container _container = new Container();
        /// <summary>
        /// The main entry point for the application.
        /// </summary>
        [STAThread]
        public static void Main(){

            var app = new MyApp.App();
            Register();
            app.Run(_container.GetInstance<MainWindow>());
        }

        static void Register()
        {
            _container.Register<MainWindow>();
            MySimpleInjector.Register(_container);
            _container.Verify();
        }
    }

and then, in a Separate .dll project, MyApp.Common

    public class MySimpleInjector
    {
        private readonly Container _container;

        public static void Register(Container container)
        {
            var injector = new MySimpleInjector(container);
        }

        private void RegisterDependencies()
        {
            var serviceConfigSection = ServiceConfigurationSection.Get();
            
            _container.RegisterSingle<ILoggingProvider, LoggingProvider>();
            _container.RegisterSingle<IServiceClient>(() => new ServiceClient(_container.GetInstance<ILoggingProvider>()));
            _container.RegisterSingle<IConfigurationSection>(() => SetupConfigurationSection.Get());
            _container.RegisterSingle<ISetupService, SetupService>();

       }
    }

I appreciate that this may not be the ideal solution - but it suits my purposes.

Again, thanks for your help and comments! Andrew.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.