5

I found an unexpected behavior when using Lua for generating a string from a tree-like structure using closures and recursion.

I simplified the code to this, and made a JS version. The JS version works as expected, but I don't understand why or how exactly.

The code is:

function union(children)
    local union = {}
    function union:method(p)
        print("union method", p, #children)

        -- rename p2 to p to make it work as expected
        function f(p2, children)
            print("union f", p, #children)
            local result = nil
            if #children == 1 then
                result = children[1]:method(p)
            elseif #children == 2 then
                result = children[1]:method(p) .. children[2]:method(p) 
            else
                local first_child = table.remove(children)
                result = first_child:method(p) .. f(p, children)
            end
            return result
        end
        return f(p, children)
    end        
    return union
 end

 function transform(children)
    local child = children[1]
    local transform = {}
    function transform:method(p)
        print("transform start")
        res = child:method(p .. "TRANSFORMED  ")
        print("transform end")
        return res
    end        
    return transform
 end

 function leaf()
    local leaf = {}
    function leaf:method(p)
        return p
    end
    return leaf
 end

root = union({leaf(), leaf(), transform({union({leaf()})}) })
print(root:method("p"))

The output is: "pTRANSFORMED pTRANSFORMED pTRANSFORMED"

But I expected: "pTRANSFORMED pp"

In summary, I don't understand why the "transformation" node is affecting the three leaves instead of just one.

The JS code is:

function union(children){
    const union = {}
    union.getField = (p) =>{
        function f(p2, children){
            console.log("union", p, p2, children.length)
            let result = null
            if (children.length == 1 ){
                result =  children[0].getField(p)
            }else if ( children.length == 2 ){
                result = children[0].getField(p) + children[1].getField(p) 
            }else {
                const first_child = children.pop()
                result = first_child.getField(p) + f(p, children) 
            }
            return result
        }
        return f(p, children)
    }      
    return union
}

 function transform(children){
    const child = children[0]
    const transform = {}
    transform.getField = (p)=>{
        return child.getField(p + "TRANSFORMED  ")
    }      
    return transform
 }

 function leaf(){
    const leaf = {}
    leaf.getField = (p) =>{
        return p
    }
    return leaf
 }

const root = union([leaf(), leaf(), transform([union([leaf()])]) ])
console.log(root.getField("p"))
2
  • Can you post the JavaScript version of your code too? Commented Nov 29, 2022 at 0:08
  • BTW, local first_child = table.remove(children) returns the last child instead of the first one. You need table.remove(children, 1) to return the first child.
    – ESkri
    Commented Nov 29, 2022 at 8:27

1 Answer 1

3

The function f is not lexically scoped to each union:method.

function foo()
end

is equivalent to

foo = function ()
end

Every a time a union:method is called, the function f is redefined in the lexical scope of the chunk.

This creates a closure around the upvalue p when last redefined.

A couple of print statements bring this to light:

function union(children)
    local union = {}

    function union:method(p)
        print("union method", p, #children)

        function f(p2, children)
            -- ...
            print('f<p>', p)
            -- ...
        end

        print('f redefined', f)

        return f(p, children)
    end

    return union
end
union method    p   3
f redefined function: 0x5652063c80c0
f<p>    p
union method    pTRANSFORMED    1
f redefined function: 0x5652063c8780
f<p>    pTRANSFORMED
f<p>    pTRANSFORMED
pTRANSFORMED  pTRANSFORMED  pTRANSFORMED

root:method("p") causes f to close around the value of p as "p", but the first child method called is the transformed union,

local first_child = table.remove(children)
result = first_child:method(p) .. f(p, children)

which causes the redefinition of f to close around its argument p .. "TRANSFORMED". The pseudo-recursive call is made right after, executing

result = children[1]:method(p) .. children[2]:method(p)

which the incorrect value of p.

Changing p2 to p brings the correct value back into scope via an argument, instead of being ignored for an incorrect upvalue. At this point the function does not close around anything, and could actually be placed completely outside the definition of union.

Alternatively, lexically scoping each function to each union:method causes it to create the correct closures,

local function f(_, __)

evidenced by needing no arguments.

union method    p   3
f redefined function: 0x55b789c4f0a0
f<p>    p
union method    pTRANSFORMED    1
f redefined function: 0x55b789c4f7a0
f<p>    pTRANSFORMED
f<p>    p
pTRANSFORMED  pp

In JavaScript, function declarations

function f(p2, children) {

}

are lexically scoped (and hoisted) within their enclosing block.

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