0

I am exploring the use of Promise.all(), but I don't know why it doesn't give me expect result. I try to illustrate it step by step.

Let take a look of my code:

var p2 = 1337;
var p3 = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  setTimeout(resolve, 2000, 'foo');
});


var apiCall = async () =>{
    // to simulate a api call that will response after 5 sec 
     setTimeout(() => {return 1000}, 5000); 
    
}

Promise.all([p2,p3,apiCall()]).then(values => {
  console.log(values); // [3, 1337, undefine], but I expect  [3, 1337, 1000]
});

apiCall().then((response)=>{console.log(response)})

As my understanding, async function will immediately return a Promise, which is what Promise.all will wait for.

So I expect,

.then(values => {
  console.log(values); // [3, 1337, undefined]
});

will only execute after 5 sec.

But the output is like below in 2 sec already, and not [3, 1337, 1000]

undefined   
[ 1337, 'foo', undefined ]

I dont know where the problem lies, I expect

apiCall().then((response)=>{console.log(response)})

will give me "1000" instead of undefined


new edit

After gathering you guys answers, I tried this.

As my understanding, setTimeout is also a async, and it will automatically return a promise like any other promise.

So, based on this understanding, I write below code. but it doesnt work. I understand using Promise constructor will fix the problem. But I dont know what problem lies in this example

var apiCall = async () =>{
    // to simulate a api call that will response after 5 sec 
     const a = setTimeout(() => {return 1000}, 5000); 
    return a 
}
11
  • 1
    It's not Promise.all() - it's apiCall() which doesn't correctly return a value after some time.
    – VLAZ
    Nov 29, 2022 at 9:29
  • 2
    This has nothing to do with Promises. return is meaningless in a setTimeout callback. Nov 29, 2022 at 9:29
  • 1
    @AeLeung You’ll have to use a Promise constructor; see What is the JavaScript version of sleep()?. You can pass a value to resolve using the third argument of setTimeout: setTimeuot(resolve, 5000, 1000);. Nov 29, 2022 at 9:31
  • 1
    "apiCall().then((response)=>{console.log(response)}) will give me "1000" instead of undefined" I assure you, it doesn't. "how to fix it?" is in conflict with "let assume it is a api call situation" - if you have a real proper async function, then it must work. Fixing this faulty function will not solve your real issue.
    – VLAZ
    Nov 29, 2022 at 9:32
  • 1
    What it does is return a proper promise that resolves when the async operation finishes. Doesn't return immediately but also start a timer which fires in the future, yet is completely unconnected to the promise that was already returned and resolved.
    – VLAZ
    Nov 29, 2022 at 9:39

3 Answers 3

6

Your api call is not returning the value properly. Try by returning a promise which resolves after the timeout

var apiCall = async () =>{
  // to simulate a api call that will response after 5 sec 
  return new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(() => {resolve(1000)}, 5000); 
  });
}
4
  • Great example! Could you also upvote my question? no sure why I cant accpet your answer right now, I will come back and check again
    – Ae Leung
    Nov 29, 2022 at 10:25
  • As promised, I tried to accepted your answer today and seems stackover could only accept one answer in this post, even though I knew it could accept multiple answers in the past. I still upvoted your answer. Thanks for your help in this question. appreciated it. @Xiduzo
    – Ae Leung
    Nov 30, 2022 at 3:14
  • 1
    @AeLeung You were never able to accept more than one answer on Stack Overflow. Nov 30, 2022 at 3:25
  • @SebastianSimon , really ? I don't know why I have impression that I have seen multiple accepted answers from somewhere or I have accepted multiple accepted answers before.
    – Ae Leung
    Nov 30, 2022 at 3:55
4

In short, you haven't done anything that would make apiCall wait for the timeout before resolving the promise.

var apiCall = async () =>{
    // to simulate a api call that will response after 5 sec 
     setTimeout(() => {return 1000}, 5000);    
}
  1. This is an async function so it return a promise.
  2. The first thing it does is call setTimeout
  3. Then it gets to the end without hitting a return statement so resolves the promise as undefined
  4. 5 seconds later the timeout finishes and calls the function passed to setTimeout. This function returns 1000. setTimeout doesn't do anything with the return value from the callback.

To get a promise from a callback API (like setTimeout) you need to use new Promise (as you did for p3).

The async keyword is only useful in that it allows you to use the await keyword. The fact it makes a the function return a promise should be thought of as a side effect needed to make await work.

await is a tool for managing existing promises.

15
  • May I know where will that 1000 return to and where to access it? say it is a api call will reutrn a result after certain secs , and I have to access it
    – Ae Leung
    Nov 29, 2022 at 9:32
  • The callback returns to the internals of setTimeout. You cannot access it because setTimeout doesn't do anything with it. I don't know what "it" you are reading but it is either wrong or you are misinterpreting it.
    – Quentin
    Nov 29, 2022 at 9:33
  • 2
    @AeLeung You’re referring to the explicit Promise construction anti-pattern. This only applies when you explicitly use a constructor invocation like new Promise in cases where a Promise is already, naturally provided in some way. For example, async (x) => new Promise((resolve) => resolve(x)). Many modern APIs utilize Promises under the hood, so constructing one is rarely needed. setTimeout does not belong to these modern APIs. Related: How do I convert an existing callback API to promises?. Nov 29, 2022 at 9:50
  • 2
    The return value of setTimeout is a number for use with clearTimeout. As previously mentioned: You need to use new Promise if you want to convert setTimeout into a promise
    – Quentin
    Nov 29, 2022 at 10:04
  • 1
    @AeLeung Almost: async (x) => x, sans return. Other than that: yes, correct. Nov 29, 2022 at 10:24
1

You are not returning anything in the apiCall. When using setTimeout you specify a callback function which will be executed after the given time. What you return in the callback basically doesn't matter.

You should make the apiCall function to return a new Promise which resolves inside the setTimeout callback.

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