1

I have a base class A, which does some preliminary stuff. There are 2 subclasses B and C, whose behaviours are slightly different from each other. There is a function in A say foo, which is almost the same for both B and C, except one little step, which involves a function call to bar. bar is virtual in A and has definitions in B and C. The problem is bar has an extra input in C. How do i handle this in the most acceptable and clean way ?

class A {
public:
       A( int a, int b );
       ~A();
       void foo( int a, int b );
       virtual void bar( int a, int b );
};

class B : public A {
public:
      B( int a, int b );
      ~B();
      void bar( int a, int b );
};

class C: public A {
public:
      C( int a, int b, int c );
      ~C();
      void bar( int a, int b, int c );
}

void A::foo( int a, int b )
{
    // Some code
    bar( a, b );
    // Some code
}

A::A( int a, int b )
{
    // Some code
    foo( a, b );
    // Some code 
}

The constructor and only the constructor calls foo which inturn is the only function that calls bar. I understand functions with a different signature than the base class doesnt override the virtual function in the base class. One way of doing it, is to have c as an argument to A::foo and A::bar also, but i want to avoid doing it, since c wont make much sense in case of B. Is there a better way of passing c cleanly to bar ?

Edit:

To give some context, class A is a FileReader class which reads from a file, and stores it in a vector<unordered_map<int,int>>, where every index in the vector corresponds to a record.

For class C, instead of having just a single vector<unordered_map<int,int>>, it was decided that it would be better if we had a vector<unordered_map<int,int>> and a vector<size_t>, because multiple records in the input, now belong to the same entity. Here every index in the first vector correspond to the entity and not the record. And the second vector maps the record to its corresponding entity. To find which records belong to which entity, there is an external input in the form of a big structure c, which maps one field of the record to the entity.

Class B was originally just class A itself. But now since there are 2 different behaviors of the similar thing, I decided to create a separate derived class for that, and make A a template.

16
  • Why do you want to inherit B and C the virtual bar method from A? Its not because B and C have a common interface and a user can use the classes polymorphically. What else is it ? Nov 30, 2022 at 9:52
  • 2
    When you override a function in a child-class, I recommend you use the override special identifier to mark such functions. Like for example in the B class declare bar as void bar(int a, int b) override. Then the compiler will be able to give you errors when the override declaration doesn't match the parent class virtual function declaration. If you did that on C::bar you would get such an error, because it doesn't override A::bar. Instead it's an overload. As such it's a totally different function. Nov 30, 2022 at 9:56
  • @463035818_is_not_a_number bar method is a small part of the foo method which happens to differ between B and C. Everything else that foo does, is the same. B and C are pretty much the same thing except for a single internal data structure, which the function bar handles. Nov 30, 2022 at 9:56
  • 1
    @HarishGanesan that doesnt make sense. If foo is the same and implemented in the base, then it either calls bar(a,b); or it calls bar(a,b,c);. The base class doesnt know about the child classes. There is a deeper problem with your design. I suggest you to read about the template method pattern (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template_method_pattern), and for the question it would help if you explain the motivation as this seems to be a xy problem meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem Nov 30, 2022 at 9:59
  • 1
    @Someprogrammerdude It doesnt have to be passed through an argument. Since the extra input always comes through the constructor, i can even have it inside the class as a data member also. But since c isnt directly owned by the class C, I was reluctant to do it that way. Nov 30, 2022 at 10:00

4 Answers 4

3

Calling virtual function from the constructor may not do what you expect. In a constructor, the virtual call mechanism is disabled because the derived class gets created last. The objects are constructed from the base up. You can find more details here: https://isocpp.org/wiki/faq/strange-inheritance#calling-virtuals-from-ctors

In this particular case class A implementation of bar() would get called instead of class C implementation of bar().

1
  • Thank you. This is very helpful and saved me from hours of head banging. But in any case, even if this wasn't in a constructor, do you think there is any solution to this ? Nov 30, 2022 at 10:26
1

As already explained, that's not directly possible directly with your design. Firstly, as Rama said, a virtual function call from a constructor of a base class will call the base class function, not the derived class function.

Secondly, you are writing

void A::foo( int a, int b )
{
    // Some code
    bar( a, b );
    // Some code
}

this call already lacks c, where you are going to take it from?


What you should do depends on your particular situation. Following your explanation about reading from file, I would first think about a simple visitor-like pattern. As I understand, both your classes read the same data (a sequence of records), but then store it in a different way. So let the base class read raw records, and pass each record to derived classes, and let derived classes do the processing they need. Something along the lines:

void A::readAll() {
    int a, b;
    while (file >> a >> b) {
        // a, b is the raw record as stored on disk
        processRecord(a, b);
   }
}

void B::processRecord(int a, int b) {
    data_[a] = b;
}

void C::processRecord(int a, int b) {
    size_t entityId = vector_.size();
    vector_.push_back(b);
    // now vector[enityId] == b
    data_[a] = entityId;
}

In this case, you probably don't even need inheritance. Have a separate class (A) for reading file, have separate classes (B and C) for processing data, and either store a processor pointer in A (in this case you will probably need a base Processor class that is inherited by B abd C), or store A pointer in B and C (this will require reworking A's interface).

At the same time, if, for example, you file stores a, b and entityId, then you should read all three values and pass them both to subclasses, and just ignore entityId in B.

3
  • The solution you propose might work. I assume vector_ is the map from record to entity ID, i was talking about. In that case, my question is how i would get vector_ without passing it as an attribute ? If the answer is that I could store it as a class attribute of C, I have already mentioned thats a possible solution in another comment, but I was worried that the object doesn't own the map, so storing it as an attribute wont be right, technically. Nov 30, 2022 at 13:10
  • I should be stored in C, of course. If C does not own it (but why?..), then pass it to C as a pointer or as a reference.
    – Petr
    Nov 30, 2022 at 13:15
  • For now, that's the solution I have gone with, I have stored it in C as a pointer. It is not owned by it, because it is built by another class, and these classes just use it to rearrange the records properly. Nov 30, 2022 at 14:53
1

So some kinds of FileReader need additional data, and others don't. Now the question is, where is this additional data available?

  1. Where the specific FileReader is created. Then you pass the additional data to the constructor, and keep it in the object. If ownership is a problem, make it a copy, make it shared, or make sure that the owner of the additional data outlives FileReader.
  2. Where FileReader::readFile is called. Then you pass the additional data to FileReader::readFile and make the base class and all derived classes aware of it. Implementations that don't need it may simply ignore it.
  3. But (2) immediately follows (1), they are in the same function! Then you are not really using inheritance based polymorphism as intended. Everything is static and known at compile time, nothing needs to be virtual. You can ignore it and still go with (1). Alternatively, move to static polymorphism (templates, CRTP, whatever).
0

I don’t really understand why you pass things through parameters of bar. You have already passed them through the constructors. You can change the bar signature to void bar(); and use a,b,c like class attributes.

2
  • Yeah, that is one option. But then, the object doesn't own any of a,b and c. So it felt wrong to have it inside as class attributes. Nov 30, 2022 at 11:20
  • well, another option: void bar(BaseParams *param); or maybe you should refactor you code using design pattern like visitor or strategy
    – ugitho
    Nov 30, 2022 at 13:23

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