I have this class template:

template<class... T>
class Test {
  std::vector<TestCase*> test_cases;
public:
  Test() {
    // Here, for each T an instance should be added to test_cases.
    test_cases.push_back((new T)...);
  }
};

This works fine for one template argument, but for multiple arguments I get this error:

error: too many arguments to function call, expected 1, have 2

How can I use variadic templates with new this way? What is the correct syntax?


EDIT: I think my question wasn't quite clear. What I want is this:

Test<TestCase1, TestCase2, TestCase3>;
// The constructor will then be:
test_cases.push_back(new TestCase1);
test_cases.push_back(new TestCase2);
test_cases.push_back(new TestCase3);

My compiler is clang 163.7.1 with this flag: -std=c++0x.

  • std::vector<T*> test_cases; looks odd since T is more than one type there. – Flexo Sep 18 '11 at 19:19
  • @awoodland you're right. Thanks for spotting this. In fact, every T is a subclass of TestCase (that's why I use pointers). I will change this. – user142019 Sep 18 '11 at 19:20
  • You could try test_cases.push_back(new T())...;. – Kerrek SB Sep 18 '11 at 19:42
  • @Kerrer SB: when I do that, I get this error: "expected ';' after expression", with a note: "expression contains unexpanded parameter pack 'T'". – user142019 Sep 18 '11 at 19:43
  • @WTP Your newly added example is actually quite bad because it wouldn’t work (or, only when using a vector<void*>): int, double and char don’t share a common base class. – Konrad Rudolph Sep 18 '11 at 19:56
up vote 3 down vote accepted

vector::push_back expects one parameter so you can't expand the variadic template in the function call. Also I added a template parameter for the base class (from which all other classes derive).

Here's something that compiles.

struct base{};
struct d0 : base{};
struct d1 : base{};
struct d2 : base{};

#include <vector>

// termination condition for helper function
template <class T>
void add(std::vector<T*>&) { 
}

// helper function
template <class T, class Head, class... Tail>
void add(std::vector<T*>& v) { 
       v.push_back(new Head()); 
       add<T, Tail...>(v);
}

template <class T, class ... U>
class test
{
    std::vector<T*> vec;
public:
    test() {
       add<T, U...>(vec);      
    }
};

int main() 
{
    test<base, d0,d1,d2> t;
}

You can accomplish this, but it’s a bit roundabout since you write the expression directly. You need to call push_back once for each argument in the variadic template argument list.

How do you achieve this? Well, by calling a recursive function once for each template argument:

template <typename Base, typename T1, typename T2, typename... T>
void fill(std::vector<Base*>& vec) {
    vec.push_back(new T1);
    fill<Base, T2, T...>(vec);
}

template <typename Base, typename T1>
void fill(std::vector<Base*>& vec) {
    vec.push_back(new T1);
}

Here we have two overloads of the fill function, one with a variadic template argument list and one without – this is the recursion base case. As long as there are still at least two template arguments, the first version gets called. If there is only a single argument left, the second argument is called instead.

Call it like this in the constructor:

fill<TestCase, T...>(test_cases);
  • On the plus side, you can expect this to be optimised by the compiler, can't you? – bitmask Sep 18 '11 at 20:08
  • @bitmask I’m not sure what you mean by “optimised”. Since templates are completely resolved at compile time, this will be completely resolved at compile time. If you refer to inlining then yes, the “recursive” fill calls will be completely inlined. – Konrad Rudolph Sep 18 '11 at 20:12
  • Yes, I meant inlining. – bitmask Sep 18 '11 at 20:22

Pack expansion can only happen in a select number of situations and doesn't work for arbitrary expressions or statements. However, since one of those situation is list-initialization and since the order of operations is defined for the brace initializers of list-initialization syntax, it's always possible to expand an arbitrary statement. To wit:

typedef std::initializer_list<int> expand;
expand { ( test_cases.push_back(new T), void(), 0 )... };

The void() trick is to suppress any invocation of an overloaded operator,. Completely irrelevant here but I have included it since it may be useful when refactoring the functionality in a macro:

#define EXPAND( exp ) \
    std::initializer_list<int> { ( (exp), void(), 0 )... }

// No use of '...', it's in the macro body
EXPAND(( test_cases.push_back(new T) ));
  • Funny. I wrote up an answer that was nearly identical to this without noticing until now that you already had it (I changed my answer to not repeat what you said anymore now :)). But you forgot parens around (exp), void(), 0 . As it is right now, it would error trying to expand a literal 0. – Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 18 '11 at 20:48
  • @Johannes Fixed! – Luc Danton Sep 18 '11 at 20:51

On a related note, in this particular case you can use vector's initializer_list support by writing the constructor as follows

Test()
:test_cases{ new T ... }
{ }

Or by using assignment if for any reason you can't use constructor initializers

Test() {
  test_cases = { new T ... };
}

Maybe you want a tuple inside your std::vector? Not sure if this is what you intended, but this compiles at least on my G++ 4.6.1 :D

#include <vector>
#include <utility>
#include <functional>
#include <string>

template<class... T>
class Test {
  std::vector<std::tuple<T*...>> test_cases;
public:
  Test() {
    // Here, for each T an instance should be added to test_cases.
    test_cases.push_back(std::tuple<T*...>((new T)...));
  }
};

int main()
{
   Test<int, float> foo;
   Test<std::string, double> bar;
}
  • 1
    Why to_pointer<T>::type and not just T*? – Dani Sep 18 '11 at 19:27
  • Yes, good point ... Fixed it. Was fiddling around with ways to get it to compile, and didn't think of the obvious :) – Maister Sep 18 '11 at 19:34

It strikes me you want a dynamic vector of any type (although not personally looking myself, I was told by a friend there was apparently something like this in the boost library), as opposed to a template vector.

A template vector is basically a vector that can assume any of one defined type (either all ints, or all doubles, or all floats but not ints and doubles and floats).

The reason there isn't a class like this conventionally is because each item takes up a different block size in memory (a char is a byte, an int could be 4 bytes etc etc), and it would take additional resources on look-up to know what to expect (normal storage is contiguous... which a vector is, given it is 'basically' an array).

If you're looking to build your own (I tried), you're looking at void * pointers, dynamic memory allocation and a whole host of headaches involving typecasting (I am unaware of any automated method to correctly typecast an item behind the scenes, but others might be able to chip in).

  • 1
    What OP wants is entirely possible. Notice that he is explicitly using a vector of pointers. This allows polymorphism to take place if all types have a common base class (TestCase, in his example). – Konrad Rudolph Sep 18 '11 at 19:55

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