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I'm trying to make a class in Delphi that handles files. I have a property that returns the size of the file and another one that returns the position of the file. I don't know if any error can happen with these calls. Should I raise an exception?

My code is:

function TFile.GetSize: Int64;
var
  FileSizeHi, FileSizeLo: Cardinal;
begin
  FileSizeLo := GetFileSize(FHandle, @FileSizeHi);
  if (FileSizeLo = INVALID_FILE_SIZE) and (GetLastError = NO_ERROR) then
    Result := $FFFFFFFF
  else
    Result := FileSizeLo or Int64(FileSizeHi) shl 32;
end;

function TFile.GetPosition: Int64;
var
  FilePosHi, FilePosLo: Cardinal;
begin
  FilePosHi := 0;
  FilePosLo := 0;
  FilePosLo := SetFilePointer(FHandle, FilePosLo, @FilePosHi, FILE_CURRENT);
  if (FilePosLo = INVALID_SET_FILE_POINTER) and (GetLastError = NO_ERROR) then
    Result := $FFFFFFFF
  else
    Result := FilePosLo or Int64(FilePosHi) shl 32;
end;

I don't know what error could happen when I call GetFileSize or SetFilePointer (without moving the file pointer).

1
  • You can also use Int64Rec to do right away Int64Rec(Result).Lo:= GetFileSize( FHandle, @Int64Rec(Result).Hi ); and/or if Int64Rec(Result).Lo= MAXDWORD without any intermediate variables.
    – AmigoJack
    Dec 4, 2022 at 12:39

1 Answer 1

2

Yes, errors can happen with those functions, so I would recommend raising an exception, otherwise the caller doesn't know if it has received an invalid value or not, as $FFFFFFFF is a valid size/position for 64bit values. Perhaps you meant to use -1 ($FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF) instead?

However, whether you raise an exception or not, your GetLastError() check is wrong. It needs to use <> instead of =. When the file function returns $FFFFFFFF for the low value, GetLastError() will return 0 when the low value really is $FFFFFFFF, otherwise GetLastError() will return non-zero when the low/high values are invalid.

Try this:

function TFile.GetSize: Int64;
var
  FileSizeHi, FileSizeLo: DWORD;
begin
  FileSizeLo := GetFileSize(FHandle, @FileSizeHi);
  if (FileSizeLo = INVALID_FILE_SIZE) and (GetLastError <> NO_ERROR) then
    RaiseLastOSError // or: Result := -1
  else
    Result := FileSizeLo or (Int64(FileSizeHi) shl 32);
end;

function TFile.GetPosition: Int64;
var
  FilePosHi, FilePosLo: DWORD;
begin
  FilePosHi := 0;
  FilePosLo := 0;
  FilePosLo := SetFilePointer(FHandle, FilePosLo, @FilePosHi, FILE_CURRENT);
  if (FilePosLo = INVALID_SET_FILE_POINTER) and (GetLastError <> NO_ERROR) then
    RaiseLastOSError // or: Result := -1
  else
    Result := FilePosLo or (Int64(FilePosHi) shl 32);
end;

On a side note, consider using GetFileSizeEx() and SetFilePointerEx() instead, as they operate on 64bit values without breaking them up into low/high parts.

3
  • No. The Win API documentation says that if the return value is INVALID_FILE_SIZE/INVALID_SET_FILE_POINTER then you have to check GetLastError. If it's NO_ERROR, it means that the file size/file position is 0xFFFFFFFF. Otherwise it's a real error so you have to raise an exception in that case. Anyway, thanks for the info! Dec 4, 2022 at 16:31
  • @WolfWestern No, it only means the lower 32 bits are $FFFF FFFF and you truncate it to that, ignoring what the upper 32 bits may hold. A filesize can also be $2 FFFF FFFF and thanks to your logic the function will only return $FFFF FFFF.
    – AmigoJack
    Dec 4, 2022 at 19:27
  • @WolfWestern what I said is not wrong. Look at your original logic. If low is returned as $FFFFFFFF and GetLastError() returns NO_ERROR (0), you were treating that as a failure instead of a success. The code in my answer treats it as a failure properly. Dec 5, 2022 at 18:41

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