119

Is there any command in PHP to stop executing the current or parent if statement, same as break or break(1) for switch/loop. For example

$arr=array('a','b');
foreach($arr as $val)
{
  break;
  echo "test";
}

echo "finish";

in the above code PHP will not do echo "test"; and will go to echo "finish";

I need this for if

$a="test";
if("test"==$a)
{
  break;
  echo "yes"; // I don't want this line or lines after to be executed, without using another if
}
echo "finish";

I want to break the if statement above and stop executing echo "yes"; or such codes which are no longer necessary to be executed, there may be or may not be an additional condition, is there way to do this?

  • 14
    Neither of your examples makes any sense logically. – Tim Pietzcker Sep 19 '11 at 9:31
  • 1
    @Usman: If there's not a condition, then the echo (in your example) will never be executed. So you might as well delete it. – Oliver Charlesworth Sep 19 '11 at 9:58
  • 2
    Isn't try catch an option? – giannis christofakis Jul 1 '14 at 11:07

21 Answers 21

206

Don't worry about other users comments, I can understand you, SOMETIMES when developing this "fancy" things are required. If we can break an if, a lot of nested ifs won't be necessary, making the code much more clean and aesthetic.

This sample code illustrate that CERTAINS SITUATIONS where breaked if can be much more suitable than a lot of ugly nested ifs... if you haven't faced that certain situation does not mean it doesn't exists.

Ugly code

if(process_x()) {

    /* do a lot of other things */

    if(process_y()) {

         /* do a lot of other things */

         if(process_z()) {

              /* do a lot of other things */
              /* SUCCESS */

         }
         else {

              clean_all_processes();

         }

    }
    else {

         clean_all_processes();

    }

}
else {

    clean_all_processes();

}

Good looking code

do {

  if( !process_x() )
    { clean_all_processes();  break; }

  /* do a lot of other things */

  if( !process_y() )
    { clean_all_processes();  break; }

  /* do a lot of other things */

  if( !process_z() )
    { clean_all_processes();  break; }

  /* do a lot of other things */
  /* SUCCESS */

} while (0);

As @NiematojakTomasz says, the use of goto is an alternative, the bad thing about this is you always need to define the label (point target).

  • 27
    Great! Sometimes questions are misunderstood due to their deep sense. You got it perfectly, I need clean code to avoid tracking end of if – Muhammad Usman Nov 15 '11 at 10:17
  • 4
    I needed to execute the same code after each successful test (about 3 or 4 tests), and put an elseif on each failed test. This is exactly what I was searching for, now my code is KISS and DRY compliant :) Thanks! – s3v3n Jul 24 '12 at 15:26
  • 3
    Man this feels dirty! But it gets my upvote.. I'm working on a dirty system ;) – LeonardChallis Apr 24 '13 at 10:54
  • 8
    @rdlowrey, talk is free, so PLEASE show us an example of "Well-written OOP" to solve OP question :3 – AgelessEssence Jun 14 '13 at 7:47
  • 7
    Don't confuse sample's request to personal attacks... in fact, you are missing something important, not all coding should be OOP, is an insane thing writing simple tasks with the magic* of OOP. – AgelessEssence Jun 14 '13 at 21:52
93

Encapsulate your code in a function. You can stop executing a function with return at any time.

  • 2
    I though you wanted an if, not a function ? ;) – Arnaud Le Blanc Sep 19 '11 at 12:55
  • 3
    @arnaud576875 if the code is in a function, than you can use return in the if statement, to break the execution. – Maxim Krizhanovsky Nov 15 '11 at 8:28
  • A function should have "1 way in" and "1 way out". Multiple RETURNS is sloppy and error prone. – Old Man Walter May 31 '18 at 6:17
  • @OldManWalter That is only true for returning actual data. However error handling is a common exception to this rule. A throw exception or return false in multiple location are perfectly acceptable without hitting the common pitfalls the "1 way in, 1 way out" mentality is trying to protect against. – danielson317 Aug 21 '18 at 20:49
38

proper way to do this :

try{
    if( !process_x() ){
        throw new Exception('process_x failed');
    }

    /* do a lot of other things */

    if( !process_y() ){
        throw new Exception('process_y failed');
    }

    /* do a lot of other things */

    if( !process_z() ){
        throw new Exception('process_z failed');
    }

    /* do a lot of other things */
    /* SUCCESS */
}catch(Exception $ex){
    clean_all_processes();
}

After reading some of the comments, I realized that exception handling doesn't always makes sense for normal flow control. For normal control flow it is better to use "If else":

try{
  if( process_x() && process_y() && process_z() ) {
    // all processes successful
    // do something
  } else {
    //one of the processes failed
    clean_all_processes();
  }
}catch(Exception ex){
  // one of the processes raised an exception
  clean_all_processes();
}

You can also save the process return values in variables and then check in the failure/exception blocks which process has failed.

  • 1
    Exceptions can be usefull in this cases but it seems that you misuse them. Exceptions are exceptional, not for normal program flow. If the fail is exceptional then the process_x-z should throw the exception by itself; clean_all_processes() would be better in a finally-block since it is clean up which must be done anyway. – Jimmy T. Jul 7 '14 at 18:23
  • I have improved the solution. – Rahul Ranjan Jul 11 '14 at 5:33
  • Reason I did not use finally is, it's not supported till php5.5 – Rahul Ranjan Jul 11 '14 at 5:37
17

Because you can break out of a do/while loop, let us "do" one round. With a while(false) at the end, the condition is never true and will not repeat, again.

do
{
    $subjectText = trim(filter_input(INPUT_POST, 'subject'));
    if(!$subjectText)
    {
        $smallInfo = 'Please give a subject.';
        break;
    }

    $messageText = trim(filter_input(INPUT_POST, 'message'));
    if(!$messageText)
    {
        $smallInfo = 'Please supply a message.';
        break;
    }
} while(false);
  • No one says you must use that. It is just an example to "break" out. – Markus Zeller Jun 30 '16 at 17:40
  • 1
    Tidy approach - does the job. – benjaminhull Jul 18 at 14:46
15

goto:

The goto operator can be used to jump to another section in the program. The target point is specified by a label followed by a colon, and the instruction is given as goto followed by the desired target label. This is not a full unrestricted goto. The target label must be within the same file and context, meaning that you cannot jump out of a function or method, nor can you jump into one. You also cannot jump into any sort of loop or switch structure. You may jump out of these, and a common use is to use a goto in place of a multi-level break...

  • 80
    Every time you use goto, the Baby Jesus eats a kitten. Also, xkcd.com/292 – user554546 Sep 19 '11 at 9:32
  • 11
    Sorry for being consistent. I have referenced php manual page explaining exact usage of mentioned keyword. And even if it's dirty solution it's still correct solution. – NiematojakTomasz Sep 19 '11 at 9:39
  • 3
    I don't exactly understand how it's not good practice to do so ? It's much more simple than all other solutions ? – 538ROMEO Apr 1 '16 at 12:00
  • 1
    Agreed with Sébastien. In some cases, the goto operator is very useful, and simple. – Jerry Dec 28 '16 at 13:02
  • 5
    Don't worry, programmers will always make you feel you are not coding properly and want we to code like them. This is even more true in php community because we are a bunch of hipster coders and PHP gives us these freedom keywords and the freedom to be so judgmental about how everyone does things. I've used (not extensively) the goto keyword in production codes and I've never had troubles. – vdegenne Sep 19 '17 at 21:24
6

use GOTO command.

if(smth) {
   .....
   .....
   .....
   .....
   .....
   goto Area1;
   .....
   .....


}



Area1:
....your code here....

However, remember goto is not a recommended practice, because it makes the code to be formatted unusually.

  • I have tested this script , the code below goto Area1; will not be executed. – Leon Armstrong Apr 22 at 11:14
5

No, there is no way to "break" an if block like you would inside loops.:(
So turn your test into a switch !

I wonder why nobody encouraged you to use switch statement since (even if you haven't to many test cases)
Do you think it's too verbose?

I would definitely go for it here

  switch($a){
    case 'test':
        # do stuff here ...
        if(/* Reason why you may break */){
           break; # this will prevent executing "echo 'yes';" statement
        }
        echo 'yes';  # ...           
        break; # As one may already know, we might always have to break at the end of case to prevent executing following cases instructions.
    # default:
        # something else here  ..
        # break;
  }

To me Exceptions are meant to raise errors and not really to control execution flaw.
If the break behaviour you are trying to set is not about unexpected error(s), Exception handling is not the right solution here :/.

  • Interesting idea but I wouldn't use it for "real" code. – Jimmy T. Jul 7 '14 at 18:24
  • 1
    "real", what do you mean ? :/ – Stphane Jul 16 '14 at 17:08
  • 1
    @Stphane A late comment, but using a switch in this situation goes against the principle of least astonishment. A switch statement is expected to control selection of data, not to control program flow. – FWDekker Sep 30 '15 at 20:53
  • «switch compares an expression against differents values and execute a specific block of code depending on which value the expression equals to.» Then each block may evaluate subsidiary expressions that in turn may instruct the execution flow to return or skip some instructions … I don't think the switch would go against the least astonishment principle in this very narrowed usecase but, this said, the original context and requirements may indeed require some refactoring. – Stphane Apr 19 at 13:07
5

You could use a do-while(false):

    <?php
    do if ($foo)
    {
      // Do something first...

      // Shall we continue with this block, or exit now?
      if ($abort_if_block) break;

      // Continue doing something...

    } while (false);
    ?>

as described in http://php.net/manual/en/control-structures.if.php#90073

4
$a = 1;

switch($a) {

  case "1":

    if  ($condition1){
      break;
    }

    if  ($condition2){
      break;
    }

    if  ($condition3){
      break;
    }
}

In this way I got what I want. I use a switch only has a definite case and then use break in case to choose if condition. The reason why I use the break : condition1 and condition2 may both satisfy, in that situation only condition1 is applied .IF is selective according the order.

  • 8
    You don't need variable for this. Just use switch(true) { case true: – Maxim Krizhanovsky Aug 1 '14 at 6:37
1

No.

But how about:

$a="test";
if("test"==$a)
{
  if ($someOtherCondition)
  {
    echo "yes";
  }
}
echo "finish";
  • 3
    Thanks, but, I am looking for a simpler version to this to avoid too many if statements – Muhammad Usman Sep 19 '11 at 9:32
  • 2
    @Usman: If you have multiple conditions, then you need to check them. Checking a condition traditionally involves an if statement. I'm not sure how you expect to avoid this. – Oliver Charlesworth Sep 19 '11 at 9:42
1

Just move the code that is not supposed to be executed to else/elseif branch. I don't really see why would you want to do what you're trying to do.

1

The simple answer is that no, there isn't a way to break from an if statement without completely stopping the execution (via exit). Other solutions won't work for me because I can't change the structure of the if statement, since I'm injecting code into a plugin, like so:

if ( condition ) {
  // Code and variables I want to use

  // Code I have control over

  // Code I don't want to run
}
// More code I want to use
0

Answering to your question whether that is achievable or not, then yes that is achievable using "goto" operator of php.

But ethically, its not a good practice to use "goto" and of there is any need to use goto then this means that code need to be reconstructed such that requirement of goto can be removed.

According to the sample code you posted above, it can be clearly seen that the code can be reconstructed and the code that is no more required can be either deleted or commented (if possibility is there for use in future).

0
$arr=array('test','go for it');
$a='test';
foreach($arr as $val){
  $output = 'test';
  if($val === $a) $output = "";
  echo $output;
}
echo "finish";

combining your statements, i think this would give you your wished result. clean and simple, without having too much statements.

for the ugly and good looking code, my recomandation would be:

function myfunction(){
  if( !process_x() || !process_y() || !process_z()) {
    clean_all_processes();  
    return; 
  }
/*do all the stuff you need to do*/
}

somewhere in your normal code

myfunction();
-1

i have a simple solution without lot of changes. the initial statement is

I want to break the if statement above and stop executing echo "yes"; or such codes which are no longer necessary to be executed, there may be or may not be an additional condition, is there way to do this?

so, it seem simple. try code like this.

$a="test";
if("test"==$a)
{
  if (1==0){
      echo "yes"; // this line while never be executed. 
      // and can be reexecuted simply by changing if (1==0) to if (1==1) 
  }
}
echo "finish";

if you want to try without this code, it's simple. and you can back when you want. another solution is comment blocks. or simply thinking and try in another separated code and copy paste only the result in your final code. and if a code is no longer nescessary, in your case, the result can be

$a="test";
echo "finish";

with this code, the original statement is completely respected.. :) and more readable!

-1

you can use the statement 'die' e.g

<?php
if (condition)
{
statements;
die;
}
?>

in this case what you want to do does not make sense logically.

-2

The simple solution is to comment it out.

$a="test";
if("test"==$a)
{

  //echo "yes"; //no longer needed - 7/7/2014 - updateded bla bla to do foo
}

The added benefit is your not changing your original code and you can date it, initial it and put a reason why.

Why the down vote, according to the OP request I think this is a perfectly valid solution.

"I want to [break the if statement above and] stop executing echo "yes"; or such codes which are no longer necessary to be executed, there may be or may not be an additional condition, is there way to do this?"

In fact someone could look at some of the other solutions, a year latter and wonder what is going on there. As per my suggestion, one could leave good documentation for future reference, which is always good practice.

  • 2
    This does not solve the problem. The break could also be in an if. – Jimmy T. Jul 7 '14 at 18:27
  • You cant comment in an if statement? Or comment out one? Do you mean use an if to exclude execution? If so what's the point of the break then, isn't that what if statements are for? Just comment that out too. Sorry, but don't see your point. – ArtisticPhoenix Jul 7 '14 at 21:14
  • Something like this: a:if("test" == $a) { ... if(...) break a; ... } – Jimmy T. Jul 8 '14 at 17:27
-3

To completely stop the rest of the script from running you can just do

exit; //In place of break. The rest of the code will not execute

-3

I'm late to the party but I wanted to contribute. I'm surprised that nobody suggested exit(). It's good for testing. I use it all the time and works like charm.

$a ='';
$b ='';
if($a == $b){
echo 'Clark Kent is Superman';
exit();
echo 'Clark Kent was never Superman';
}

The code will stop at exit() and everything after will not run.

Result

Clark Kent is Superman

It works with foreach() and while() as well. It works anywhere you place it really.

foreach($arr as $val)
{
  exit();
  echo "test";
}

echo "finish";

Result

nothing gets printed here.

Use it with a forloop()

for ($x = 2; $x < 12; $x++) {
    echo "Gru has $x minions <br>";
    if($x == 4){
    exit();
    }
}

Result

Gru has 2 minions
Gru has 3 minions
Gru has 4 minions

In a normal case scenario

$a ='Make hot chocolate great again!';
echo $a;
exit();
$b = 'I eat chocolate and make Charlie at the Factory pay for it.';

Result

Make hot chocolate great again!
  • He clearly meant a way to break and not exit – deepakgates Feb 6 '18 at 8:35
-4

What about using ternary operator?

<?php
 // Example usage for: Ternary Operator
 $action = (empty($_POST['action'])) ? 'default' : $_POST['action'];
?>

Which is identical to this if/else statement:

<?php
 if (empty($_POST['action'])) {
   $action = 'default';
 } else {
   $action = $_POST['action'];
 }
?>
  • In PHP7: $a = $_POST['action'] ?? 'default'; – Tobias Mühl Apr 20 at 10:33
-7
$a="test";
if("test"!=$a)
{
echo "yes";                   
}
 else
 {
  echo "finish";
}

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