-1

I didn't know how to properly define this question, but here's the problem.

I have two lists like this:

x = ['Monday', 'Tuesday', 'Wednesday', 'Thursday']
z = ['Wednesday', 'Thursday', 'Friday', 'Saturday', 'Sunday']

I'd like to match up the two lists and remove any items that do not exist in both lists. That means that the output would in this case be:

y = ['Wednesday', 'Thursday']

I tried using the zip() function but couldn't get it to work. Do you have any ideas?

Thanks beforehand.

1
  • Okay. I assume I would do that but in reverse then. Dec 7, 2022 at 15:28

6 Answers 6

1

Do this:

x = ['Monday', 'Tuesday', 'Wednesday', 'Thursday']
z = ['Wednesday', 'Thursday', 'Friday', 'Saturday', 'Sunday']
res = list(set(x)&set(z))
print(res)

This would give you the desired result

0

It is called intersection:

If you want to find element which is present in both list you can use following snippet:

x = ['Monday', 'Tuesday', 'Wednesday', 'Thursday']
z = ['Wednesday', 'Thursday', 'Friday', 'Saturday', 'Sunday']

result = set(x).intersection(set(z)) 

print(result)

output

{'Thursday', 'Wednesday'}
0

one can easily do it with list comprension:

y = [i for i in z if i in x]
2
  • This will be very slow as you need to keep searching in a list i in x will perform a list search which is O(n) but for each item
    – Fawaz.D
    Dec 7, 2022 at 15:36
  • well, if the only use case is what he showed performance is irrelevant. This seams like a school exercise to me.
    – Indiano
    Dec 7, 2022 at 15:48
0

Code:-

def method1(lst1, lst2):
    lst3 = [value for value in lst1 if value in lst2] #List Comprehension
    return lst3

def method2(lst1, lst2):
    return list(set(lst1) & set(lst2)) #Using set and & operator

def method3(lst1, lst2):
    temp = set(lst2)       #Using hybrid list [temporary list] 
    lst3 = [value for value in lst1 if value in temp]
    return lst3

x = ['Monday', 'Tuesday', 'Wednesday', 'Thursday']
z = ['Wednesday', 'Thursday', 'Friday', 'Saturday', 'Sunday']
print(method1(x,z))
print(method2(x,z))
print(method3(x,z))

Output:-

['Wednesday', 'Thursday']
['Thursday', 'Wednesday']
['Wednesday', 'Thursday']
0

A one-liner way to do it (however not efficient if the lists are huge), is to turn the lists into sets to get the intersection, then you can use that to start removing items from your sets.

x = ['Monday', 'Tuesday', 'Wednesday', 'Thursday']
z = ['Wednesday', 'Thursday', 'Friday', 'Saturday', 'Sunday']
y = set(x).intersection(set(z))
-2
bar = [ 1,2,3,4,5 ]

foo = [ 1,2,3,6 ]

returnNotMatches( a,b )

would return:

[[ 4,5 ],[ 6 ]]
1
  • 1
    ...and what is returnNotMatches? That's not a built-in Python function. And it's returning a different format (a list of lists) while the expected output is a flat list. Did you perhaps forget to post the code for that function? Dec 7, 2022 at 23:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.