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I want to create 2 new longitude and 2 new latitudes based on a coordinate and a distance in meters, I want to create a nice bounding box around a certain point. It is for a part of a city and max ±1500 meters. I therefore don't think the curvature of earth has to be taken into account.

So I have 50.0452345 (x) and 4.3242234 (y) and I want to know x + 500 meters, x - 500 meters, y - 500 meters, y + 500 meters

I found many algorithms but almost all seem to deal with the distance between points.

107

The number of kilometers per degree of longitude is approximately

(2*pi/360) * r_earth * cos(theta)

where theta is the latitude in degrees and r_earth is approximately 6378 km.

The number of kilometers per degree of latitude is approximately the same at all locations, approx

(2*pi/360) * r_earth = 111 km / degree 

So you can do:

new_latitude  = latitude  + (dy / r_earth) * (180 / pi);
new_longitude = longitude + (dx / r_earth) * (180 / pi) / cos(latitude * pi/180);

As long as dx and dy are small compared to the radius of the earth and you don't get too close to the poles.

  • 2
    to convert from degree to radians you multiply with py and divide by 180. But you write cos(latitude*180/pi) – josch Apr 10 '14 at 10:26
  • 7
    @josch: Good catch. Try to correct the answer the answer next time instead of simply proposing a correction. Many people simply copy and paste code from StackOverflow thinking it is correct and ready to use. – Alex Essilfie Jul 4 '14 at 22:18
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    ok, what will be the direction? I mean if I want to add 50 meters, where it will be added? Right, left, up or down? – Tushar Monirul Feb 21 '17 at 15:55
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    The earth is not perfectly spherical, so using a single value for "radius" is an approximation. Wikipedia says "distances from points on the surface to the center range from 6,353 km to 6,384 km". It also says "Several different ways of modeling the Earth as a sphere each yield a mean radius of 6,371 km" which indicates your value. Really, if this correction is significant in your application, you should be using a better algorithm anyway. – nibot Mar 10 '17 at 17:06
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    For anyone who isn't sure the r_earth variable should be in meters and should be equal to approximately 6371000.0 – Gopgop Dec 8 '17 at 12:40
23

The accepted answer is perfectly right and works. I made some tweaks and turned into this:

double meters = 50;

// number of km per degree = ~111km (111.32 in google maps, but range varies
   between 110.567km at the equator and 111.699km at the poles)
// 1km in degree = 1 / 111.32km = 0.0089
// 1m in degree = 0.0089 / 1000 = 0.0000089
double coef = meters * 0.0000089;

double new_lat = my_lat + coef;

// pi / 180 = 0.018
double new_long = my_long + coef / Math.cos(my_lat * 0.018);

Hope this helps too.

  • 24
    0.0000089? Try to avoid magic numbers, nobody will understand this. – scai Nov 22 '16 at 20:26
  • 2
    It is a short version of earth diameter and pi numbers in the code. not magic. – Numan Karaaslan Nov 24 '16 at 7:52
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    It is still magic if nobody knows how to reproduce this number. Why don't you put the full calculation into your code? – scai Nov 24 '16 at 7:55
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    1 degree in google map is equal to 111.32 Kilometer. 1Degree = 111.32KM. 1KM in Degree = 1 / 111.32 = 0.008983. 1M in Degree = 0.000008983. – Muhammad Azeem May 11 '17 at 14:01
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    You should have made a comment in your answer, putting it in the comments is not helpful. – chutsu Jul 13 '17 at 16:54
13

For latitude do:

var earth = 6378.137,  //radius of the earth in kilometer
    pi = Math.PI,
    m = (1 / ((2 * pi / 360) * earth)) / 1000;  //1 meter in degree

var new_latitude = latitude + (your_meters * m);

For longitude do:

var earth = 6378.137,  //radius of the earth in kilometer
    pi = Math.PI,
    cos = Math.cos,
    m = (1 / ((2 * pi / 360) * earth)) / 1000;  //1 meter in degree

var new_longitude = longitude + (your_meters * m) / cos(latitude * (pi / 180));

The variable your_meters can contain a positive or a negative value.

7

Have you checked out: How do I find the lat/long that is x km north of a given lat/long ?

These calculations are annoying at best, I've done many of them. The haversine formula will be your friend.

Some reference: http://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html

  • if you work for a quite small area, is it really bad to just do latitude-0.09 and longtitude-0.0148 to get approximately a square km area? – Benjamin Udink ten Cate Sep 19 '11 at 22:28
  • I'd say it's not really bad. The square km at that level will not be distorted by the curvature of the Earth - as long as the Lat/Lng's you're dealing with is decimal. – Ryan Ternier Sep 19 '11 at 23:03
  • @BenjaminUdinktenCate That will work in Amsterdam, but will be inaccurate in other parts of the world. Doing "longitude-0.0148" will only get you about 0.16 km at the equator. – nibot Sep 20 '11 at 0:18

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