15

This question arise while trying to write test cases. Foo is a class within the framework library which I dont have source access to.

public class Foo{
  public final Object getX(){
  ...
  }
}

my applications will

public class Bar extends Foo{
  public int process(){
    Object value = getX();
    ...
  }
}

The unit test case is unable to initalize as I can't create a Foo object due to other dependencies. The BarTest throws a null pointer as value is null.

public class BarTest extends TestCase{
  public testProcess(){
    Bar bar = new Bar();        
    int result = bar.process();
    ...
  }
}

Is there a way i can use reflection api to set the getX() to non-final? or how should I go about testing?

6 Answers 6

23

As this was one of the top results for "override final method java" in google. I thought I would leave my solution. This class shows a simple solution using the example "Bagel" class and a free to use javassist library:

/**
 * This class shows how you can override a final method of a super class using the Javassist's bytecode toolkit
 * The library can be found here: http://jboss-javassist.github.io/javassist/
 * 
 * The basic idea is that you get the super class and reset the modifiers so the modifiers of the method don't include final.
 * Then you add in a new method to the sub class which overrides the now non final method of the super class.
 * 
 * The only "catch" is you have to do the class manipulation before any calls to the class happen in your code. So put the
 * manipulation as early in your code as you can otherwise you will get exceptions.
 */

package packagename;

import javassist.ClassPool;
import javassist.CtClass;
import javassist.CtMethod;
import javassist.CtNewMethod;
import javassist.Modifier;

/** 
 * A simple class to show how to use the library
 */
public class TestCt {

    /** 
     * The starting point for the application
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        // in order for us to override the final method we must manipulate the class using the Javassist library.
        // we need to do this FIRST because once we initialize the class it will no longer be editable.
        try
        {
            // get the super class
            CtClass bagel = ClassPool.getDefault().get("packagename.TestCt$Bagel");

            // get the method you want to override
            CtMethod originalMethod = bagel.getDeclaredMethod("getDescription");

            // set the modifier. This will remove the 'final' modifier from the method.
            // If for whatever reason you needed more than one modifier just add them together
            originalMethod.setModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC);

            // save the changes to the super class
            bagel.toClass();

            // get the subclass
            CtClass bagelsolver = ClassPool.getDefault().get("packagename.TestCt$BagelWithOptions");

            // create the method that will override the super class's method and include the options in the output
            CtMethod overrideMethod = CtNewMethod.make("public String getDescription() { return super.getDescription() + \" with \" + getOptions(); }", bagelsolver);

            // add the new method to the sub class
            bagelsolver.addMethod(overrideMethod);

            // save the changes to the sub class
            bagelsolver.toClass();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        // now that we have edited the classes with the new methods, we can create an instance and see if it worked

        // create a new instance of BagelWithOptions
        BagelWithOptions myBagel = new BagelWithOptions();

        // give it some options
        myBagel.setOptions("cheese, bacon and eggs");

        // print the description of the bagel to the console.
        // This should now use our new code when calling getDescription() which will include the options in the output.
        System.out.println("My bagel is: " + myBagel.getDescription());

        // The output should be:
        // **My bagel is: a plain bagel with cheese, bacon and eggs**
    }

    /**
     * A plain bagel class which has a final method which we want to override
     */
    public static class Bagel {

        /**
         * return a description for this bagel
         */
        public final String getDescription() {
            return "a plain bagel";
        }
    }

    /**
     * A sub class of bagel which adds some extra options for the bagel.
     */
    public static class BagelWithOptions extends Bagel {

        /**
         * A string that will contain any extra options for the bagel
         */
        String  options;

        /**
         * Initiate the bagel with no extra options
         */
        public BagelWithOptions() {
            options = "nothing else";
        }

        /**
         * Set the options for the bagel
         * @param options - a string with the new options for this bagel
         */
        public void setOptions(String options) {
            this.options = options;
        }

        /**
         * return the current options for this bagel
         */
        public String getOptions() {
            return options;
        }
    }
}
7
  • How are you getting this to work? Those classes are already defined, and loaded in the ClassLoader. Every time I try to simply toClass() on a clas that already exists, I get an error like the following: Caused by: java.lang.LinkageError: loader (instance of sun/misc/Launcher$AppClassLoader): attempted duplicate class definition for name:"com/package/ClassName" Commented May 25, 2018 at 20:06
  • @XaeroDegreaz I made a JDoodle. It only works if you change the JDK to 1.8.
    – Curtis
    Commented May 29, 2018 at 15:02
  • note: using the latest version of javassist might work on JDK 9 or 10. I didnt really try to get it to work in those environments.
    – Curtis
    Commented May 30, 2018 at 19:52
  • Add new Bagel(); to the beginning of main and this approach blows up. Overall a good try though +1 Commented Feb 4, 2019 at 17:53
  • @AmirAfghani I explained why this happens in the top comment of the class: The only "catch" is you have to do the class manipulation before any calls to the class happen in your code. So put the manipulation as early in your code as you can otherwise you will get exceptions. So yes if you instantiate the class before you do the class manipulation it will blow up because the JVM will have already loaded the class. If you want it to work you must do the class manipulation first.
    – Curtis
    Commented Feb 4, 2019 at 18:24
5

you could create another method which you could override in your test:

public class Bar extends Foo {
  protected Object doGetX() {
    return getX();
  }
  public int process(){
    Object value = doGetX();
    ...
  }
}

then, you could override doGetX in BarTest.

2

Seb is correct, and just to ensure that you get an answer to your question, short of doing something in native code (and I am pretty sure that would not work) or modifying the bytecode of the class at runtime, and creating the class that overrides the method at runtime, I cannot see a way to alter the "finalness" of a method. Reflection will not help you here.

2
  • are you referring to Aspect-oriented aka AOP? any idea if AOP can change the access to non-final?
    – zeroin23
    Commented Apr 15, 2009 at 11:08
  • 1
    I wasn't really meaning AOP, not sure if it can do it, I was thinking more along the lines of jakarta.apache.org/bcel. However, if somehting is hard to do there is probably a reason for it... and generally hard things should not be done :-)
    – TofuBeer
    Commented Apr 15, 2009 at 14:27
0

If your unit test case can't create Foo due to other dependencies, that might be a sign that you're not making your unit test right in the first place.

Unit tests are meant to test under the same circumstances a production code would run, so I'd suggest recreating the same production environment inside your tests. Otherwise, your tests wouldn't be complete.

5
  • 7
    That is not what unit tests are for. Unit tests are for extremely granular units of code. What you're describing sounds more like integration tests or possibly functional tests.
    – Hank Gay
    Commented Apr 14, 2009 at 16:40
  • Not necessarily; I don't know the specific circumstances in which he's working (i.e. other classes, DB, etc.), but there are certain tests you can do with many classes at once - for example, if you're using an external library, it's ok to assume it's working ok and use all its clases in your tests.
    – Seb
    Commented Apr 14, 2009 at 16:47
  • 4
    Yeah, there are "certain tests you can do with many classes at once". Those aren't unit tests. Still useful, and important to do, but they aren't unit tests. Commented Apr 14, 2009 at 17:05
  • 1
    "Unit", "smoke", "integration", "black box", "white box", etc. are all distractions from the original question. The dev wants to figure out whether or not they can substitute an alternative method for the framework's final. I think this exposes a flawed dependency that requires some refactoring.
    – gregturn
    Commented Apr 14, 2009 at 17:45
  • 1
    gregturn> actually the dependency was expressed intentionally as the framework dev did not want anyone to override it. Yes, you have summarised nicely my intend. thx 8)
    – zeroin23
    Commented Apr 15, 2009 at 11:20
0

If the variable returned by getX() is not final you can use the technique explained in What’s the best way of unit testing private methods? for changing the value of the private variable through Reflection.

0
0
public class Bar extends Foo{
  public int process(){
    Object value = getX();
    return process2(value);
  }
  public int process2(Object value){
  ...
  }
}

public class BarTest extends TestCase{
  public testProcess(){
    Bar bar = new Bar();   
    Mockobj mo = new Mockobj();     
    int result = bar.process2(mo);
    ...
  }
}

what i did eventually was the above. it is a bit ugly... James solution is definitely much better than this...

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