16

Is there a built in function that would allow me to calculate the modular inverse of a(mod n)? e.g. 19^-1 = 11 (mod 30), in this case the 19^-1 == -11==19;

1
  • Note that you can reverse arbitrary multiplications. For example 2 has multiplicative inverse modulo 30 since GCD(2,30)!=1 Commented Sep 20, 2011 at 10:39

5 Answers 5

22

Since .Net 4.0+ implements BigInteger with a special modular arithmetics function ModPow (which produces “X power Y modulo Z”), you don't need a third-party library to emulate ModInverse. If n is a prime, all you need to do is to compute:

a_inverse = BigInteger.ModPow(a, n - 2, n)

For more details, look in Wikipedia: Modular multiplicative inverse, section Using Euler's theorem, the special case “when m is a prime”. By the way, there is a more recent SO topic on this: 1/BigInteger in c#, with the same approach suggested by CodesInChaos.

1
  • 6
    Please note that it's the special case, when m is a prime.
    – mja
    Commented Mar 6, 2017 at 15:19
11
int modInverse(int a, int n) 
{
    int i = n, v = 0, d = 1;
    while (a>0) {
        int t = i/a, x = a;
        a = i % x;
        i = x;
        x = d;
        d = v - t*x;
        v = x;
    }
    v %= n;
    if (v<0) v = (v+n)%n;
    return v;
}
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  • Seems to work, but it would be nice if it could signal (e.g. by throwing an exception) if the inverse is impossible (a is not invertible modulo n) which happens when a and n shares a non-trivial factor (their GCD exceeds one). Commented Jul 3, 2017 at 15:19
3

The BouncyCastle Crypto library has a BigInteger implementation that has most of the modular arithmetic functions. It's in the Org.BouncyCastle.Math namespace.

3

Here is a slightly more polished version of Samuel Allan's algorithm. The TryModInverse method returns a bool value, that indicates whether a modular multiplicative inverse exists for this number and modulo.

public static bool TryModInverse(int number, int modulo, out int result)
{
    if (number < 1) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(nameof(number));
    if (modulo < 2) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(nameof(modulo));
    int n = number;
    int m = modulo, v = 0, d = 1;
    while (n > 0)
    {
        int t = m / n, x = n;
        n = m % x;
        m = x;
        x = d;
        d = checked(v - t * x); // Just in case
        v = x;
    }
    result = v % modulo;
    if (result < 0) result += modulo;
    if ((long)number * result % modulo == 1L) return true;
    result = default;
    return false;
}
0

There is no library for getting inverse mod, but the following code can be used to get it.

// Given a and b->ax+by=d
long[] u = { a, 1, 0 };
long[] v = { b, 0, 1 };
long[] w = { 0, 0, 0 };
long temp = 0;
while (v[0] > 0)
{
    double t = (u[0] / v[0]);
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        w[i] = u[i] - ((int)(Math.Floor(t)) * v[i]);
        u[i] = v[i];
        v[i] = w[i];
    }
}
// u[0] is gcd while u[1] gives x and u[2] gives y. 
// if u[1] gives the inverse mod value and if it is negative then the following gives the first positive value
if (u[1] < 0)
{
        while (u[1] < 0)
        {
            temp = u[1] + b;
            u[1] = temp;
        }
}

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