I've seen so many complicated questions in SO whether or not some complicated structure is considered to be valid JSON.

But what about something on the other end of the spectrum?

"12345"

Is the above valid JSON?

  • You may find this page usefull: jsonlint.com – Martin York Sep 20 '11 at 15:59
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    @Christian, Were any of the answers below helpful to you? If so, you should consider marking one as the answer. – James Hill Nov 9 '11 at 14:17
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    possible duplicate of What is the minimum valid JSON? – Rimas Sep 28 '15 at 19:43
  • @JamesHill I'm finally getting around to marking one as the answer. Thanks for the reminder from such a long time ago – Christian Jun 9 '16 at 12:21
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    As per RFC4627 (july 2006) A JSON text is a serialized object or array. but that definition has changed as per RFC7159 (march 2014) A JSON text is a serialized value. which means now all valid JSON value i.e. "abcd", 1234, null, true, false, {}, and [] are all valid JSON text as well. – sactiw Jun 17 '16 at 11:32
up vote 45 down vote accepted

It is valid JSON syntax representing a JSON value. Whether or not is a valid JSON text (the formal term used to refer to the complete output of a JSON generator) depends on the context.

In Douglas Crockford's RFC 4627 published in 2006 (which defines the application/json internet media type):

A JSON text is a serialized object or array.

Therefore it would not be legal to use that simple string as the complete body of an HTTP response with the internet media type application/json.

However, JSON specification has been updated in RFC 7159 published in 2014, as well as in the edition 5.1 of ECMA-262 and in ECMA-404. The new specifications do not have the above limitation, and so would consider that simple string to be a valid JSON text. In RFC 7159:

A JSON text is a serialized value. Note that certain previous specifications of JSON constrained a JSON text to be an object or an array. Implementations that generate only objects or arrays where a JSON text is called for will be interoperable in the sense that all implementations will accept these as conforming JSON texts.


A JSON value, from json.org:

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    RFC-4627 has been superseded by tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7159. The spec now reads: > A JSON text is a serialized value. Note that certain previous specifications of JSON constrained a JSON text to be an object or an array. – Kriil Feb 14 '17 at 20:37

As of 2014, RFC 7159 obsoletes the older JSON RFCs, and declares that any JSON value is valid JSON text and valid application/json content - including strings. However, it also points out the incompatibility issue with older JSON implementations:

Note that certain previous specifications of JSON constrained a JSON text to be an object or an array. Implementations that generate only objects or arrays where a JSON text is called for will be interoperable in the sense that all implementations will accept these as conforming JSON texts.

It is a valid JSON string, but isn't a valid JSON text (i.e. JSON file).

See the JSON specification which says:

A JSON text is a serialized object or array.

So you can use that inside some JSON, but isn't a complete JSON file by itself.

(It is also worth noting that the specification defines a JSON parser:

A JSON parser transforms a JSON text into another representation.

my <em>)

For a second opinion, see JSON Lint:

Parse error on line 1:
"12345"
^
Expecting '{', '['
  • <em> is usually rendered as italics, not bold. :) – Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 20 '11 at 16:26
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    is this answer still valid? Jsonlint showing it as 'valid json'. – Ayan May 19 '17 at 3:34

No, this is not valid JSON. JSON is an acronym for JavaScript Object Notation. While the example you gave would be valid inside an object defined using JSON, it's not valid by itself. Take a look at this online JSON validator: http://jsonlint.com/

Parse error on line 1: 12345 ^ Expecting '{', '['

You can read more about JSON at http://json.org.

  • jsonlint.com meanwhile emits that "12345" is valid JSON. Same with null. – TheOperator Jan 19 '16 at 7:48
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    This answer seems to be very old and outdated. While it was probably correct when posted, it is now incorrect. – Andreas Aug 18 '16 at 12:31
  • @Andreas, I would still disagree with you, and with your downvote on a 5 year old answer. Lots of JSON validators would disagree with you also - Expecting object or array, not string. – James Hill Aug 18 '16 at 15:44
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    @JamesHill So you mean that if you go to jsonlint.com, write "12345" and press Validate JSON (as it says in the answer), you would not get the result Valid JSON ? I apologize for the downvote but at the very least the example in this answer is wrong. – Andreas Aug 19 '16 at 8:32
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    Well, what some parsers say is irrelevant. What RFCs says is, and the newer ones say it's ok. If I provide an API, and someones points a problem with this, I refer them to the RFCs and they just have to update their parser. – ymajoros Jul 4 at 14:29

Its a valid JSON string, but its not a JSON object.

See http://www.json.org/

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